Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Do anyone know in which hippocratic text that Hippocrates mentioned the healing properties of seawater when he observed that the wounded hands of fisherman healed particularly fast?

    and, a side question, seawater has healing properties right? how did this property of seawater to heal wounds come by?

    is it caused by salt's antimicrobial property to inhibit bacterial growth and therefore infection could be contained and this leads to faster wound healing process?

    answers are desperately needed. i've searched journals internet books but they all just mention what Hippocrates said and does not tell me where it was actually mentioned! same goes for the second question, all statement and no explanation so i hope to get some clarification from here.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mistleo)
    Do anyone know in which hippocratic text that Hippocrates mentioned the healing properties of seawater when he observed that the wounded hands of fisherman healed particularly fast?

    and, a side question, seawater has healing properties right? how did this property of seawater to heal wounds come by?

    is it caused by salt's antimicrobial property to inhibit bacterial growth and therefore infection could be contained and this leads to faster wound healing process?

    answers are desperately needed. i've searched journals internet books but they all just mention what Hippocrates said and does not tell me where it was actually mentioned! same goes for the second question, all statement and no explanation so i hope to get some clarification from here.
    I don't know what text you're referring to, but yes to the bold line, that would make sense.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    thanks anyway, but the main thing i want to know is if the reduced bacterial growth, meaning less infection would actually speed us the rate of wound healing. for example, is there a correlation between minimal infection and wound healing?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mistleo)
    thanks anyway, but the main thing i want to know is if the reduced bacterial growth, meaning less infection would actually speed us the rate of wound healing. for example, is there a correlation between minimal infection and wound healing?
    Yes.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Kills bugs by osmosis I imagine. Higher Na+ gradient in the water = influx of Na+ into the cell, followed by water, pop!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by digitalis)
    Kills bugs by osmosis I imagine. Higher Na+ gradient in the water = influx of Na+ into the cell, followed by water, pop!
    that's... pretty much the opposite of how osmosis works
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thisismycatch22)
    that's... pretty much the opposite of how osmosis works
    Is it?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by digitalis)
    Is it?
    I think the other guy thinks you're referring to water potential

    but they're virtually one and the same thing - a low water potential causes water to move in by osmosis, bursting the bacterium cell.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by digitalis)
    Is it?
    yes. you're saying that osmosis will result in water passing from a solution of higher osmolarity to one with lower osmolarity... because all the solutes will diffuse into the lower osmolarity environment down a concentration gradient and then pull water with them. that's backwards. water will flow across the membrane into the solution with the lower osmolarity, full stop. sodium ions won't diffuse into the bacterium because cell membranes, being hydrophobic, are not incredibly permeable to ions, being charged. you're a medical student, think about it: if cell membranes were that permeable to ions, your nervous system wouldn't work since there'd be no point opening (or even having) Na+ channels!

    i know this is true because my job actually involves balancing the concentrations of salt in various solutions so that this exact thing does not happen to the cells i study... if it did, i'd be able to see it all too easily and watch my work go down the drain!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thisismycatch22)
    yes. you're saying that osmosis will result in water passing from a solution of higher osmolarity to one with lower osmolarity... because all the solutes will diffuse into the lower osmolarity environment and then pull water with them. that's backwards. water will flow across the membrane into the solution with the lower osmolarity, full stop. sodium ions won't diffuse into the bacterium because cell membranes, being hydrophobic, are not incredibly permeable to ions, being charged. you're a medical student, think about it: if cell membranes were that permeable to ions, your nervous system wouldn't work since there'd be no point opening Na+ channels!
    Yeah, you are right, my bad.

    Water moving out of the cell to the higher sodium concentration in the salt water would cause the cell to shrink and lyse.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Just to make sure, water potential is the same as water activity right? or is there some difference? water will move into both low water potential and low water activity regions from areas with low osmolarity right?
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: April 6, 2011
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.