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    (Original post by Kash:))
    Does this make sense? I need to write about the glucose in relation to digestion. Fairly brief is fine.


    In the mouth salivary amylase breaks down starch into glucose.

    It does this by breaking it's glycosidic bonds by hydrolosis reaction.

    Starch is continued to be digested in the stomach.

    When it reaches the small intestines, glucose is absorbed into the blood by active transport.


    Where does assimilation fit into this? If it does fit in anywhere.

    And how would I fit in monosaccharides and polysaccharides in?

    Thanks TSR...
    Glucose is a monosaccharide whereas starch and glycogen are polysaccrahrides with a difference of glycosidic bond formation. One has hydroxyl bonded above whereas other has it on the bottom. One way to remember it is ABBA - Alpha Above, Beta Below.


    I can't recall much about assimilation but glucose is used as a source for ATP in aerobic respiration OR converted into glycogen in the liver.
    In short glucose level rises in the blood,the same blood flows through the pancreatic cells called Islet of Langerhans's which in a series of steps drop down glucose level.
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    (Original post by Kash:))

    Where does assimilation fit into this? If it does fit in anywhere.

    And how would I fit in monosaccharides and polysaccharides in?

    Thanks TSR...
    Assimilation occurs after it's been actively transported into the blood. It's either used by cells in repsiration to produce ATP, or if glucose levels are too high for respiration alone the beta-cells of the islets of langerhans in the pancreas increase insulin production. Which stimulates the liver to convert excess glucose into glycogen via glycogenesis
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    Sorry to be of no help but oh how I miss human biology.... :emo:
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    Sounds good for a brief description, taking into account the help you've received. What about a little more info on the structure of starch/ glucose? That way you could fit saccharides in etc. Also, enzymes involved in digestion later in the gut? What about other saccharides such as maltose etc?

    Also, don't know if it was a typing error but: HydrolYsis
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    (Original post by Kash:))
    When it reaches the small intestines, glucose is absorbed into the blood by active transport.
    ...isn't it co-transport (or secondary active transport) with sodium ions?
 
 
 
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