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    (Original post by Harrifer)
    As far as I am aware running longer distances burns more calories than running shorter distances at a higher speed, so I would say focus on distance.
    I don't know but that's not what I've heard. I'm told HIIT (High intensity interval training) burns fat very fast and it's basically short bursts of heavy excercise (say 100m sprints) repeated.
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    (Original post by Harrifer)
    I think it's all been cleared up quite well here.

    Avoiding fatty and sugary foods whilst keeping running regularly should do the trick for weight loss. As far as I am aware running longer distances burns more calories than running shorter distances at a higher speed, so I would say focus on distance.
    I think though I am going to sub running for rowing. Whilst maintaining a healthy diet etc.
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    (Original post by zxh800)
    I don't know but that's not what I've heard. I'm told HIIT (High intensity interval training) burns fat very fast and it's basically short bursts of heavy excercise (say 100m sprints) repeated.
    With the inbetween periods being of low exercise (like a rest).
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    Swimming is mucho bien for you and so is fruit.
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    (Original post by F_shakeey)
    Swimming is mucho bien for you and so is fruit.
    Yeah but with swimming people will see, and I am a bit too embarrased for that.
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    (Original post by NeonSkies)
    Sounds good. Yeah if you blend them in together your heart will become stronger so your stamina improves as well as your muscle tone. Win-win

    (Original post by SPMS)
    Samatkins suggested rowing surely this is like the perfect exercise? Resistance and works the chest area whilst blending with cardio?
    Yes rowing is very good cardio-vascularly but it really doesn't work the chest muscles at all. Are you thin but with moobs or are you just fat in general? If it's the first then it's called gynecomastia and it's a medical condition, if you're just fat then simply losing weight will reduce the size of your moobs.
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    (Original post by AMorgan26)
    Yes rowing is very good cardio-vascularly but it really doesn't work the chest muscles at all. Are you thin but with moobs or are you just fat in general? If it's the first then it's called gynecomastia and it's a medical condition, if you're just fat then simply losing weight will reduce the size of your moobs.
    Yeah, I was looking into that but looking at the rest of me also, I came to the conclusion I am just fat lol.
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    (Original post by NeonSkies)
    I'm pretty sure a negative calorie intake whilst building up muscle is very bad for your health:confused: What would you live off!

    Why the neg it was a genuine question... wouldn't you be fainting all the time?
    (I didn't neg you)

    A negative calorie intake is only "bad for your health" if you take it too far (i.e. starving yourself) or if you are seriously underweight (which is a danger in itself, anyway).

    Building up serious muscle is hard to do if you are on a negative calorie intake, but in this case the OP is not a bodybuilder and is simply looking to tone up his chest. It is not dangerous in this respect. The only completely constant rule in dieting is calorie deficit = weight loss (although this may include muscle as well as fat if you don't stimulate your muscles and get enough protein in your diet). Some people may only have to hover below their calorie maintenance level to see results, others will have more trouble. But like I said, it is only unhealthy if you take it too far and deprive your body of essential energy and nutrients
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    Yeah but with swimming people will see, and I am a bit too embarrased for that.
    Invest in a private pool mate and watch how those moobs turn into muscle
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    (Original post by AmericanPsycho)
    (I didn't neg you)

    A negative calorie intake is only "bad for your health" if you take it too far (i.e. starving yourself) or if you are seriously underweight (which is a danger in itself, anyway).

    Building up serious muscle is hard to do if you are on a negative calorie intake, but in this case the OP is not a bodybuilder and is simply looking to tone up his chest. It is not dangerous in this respect. The only completely constant rule in dieting is calorie deficit = weight loss (although this may include muscle as well as fat if you don't stimulate your muscles and get enough protein in your diet). Some people may only have to hover below their calorie maintenance level to see results, others will have more trouble. But like I said, it is only unhealthy if you take it too far and deprive your body of essential energy and nutrients
    Ahhh fair enough. The way I read it made me think you meant starving yourself, then exercising!

    I didn't think it was you negging but I was just wondering why someone would, nevermind lol.
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    Yeah, I was looking into that but looking at the rest of me also, I came to the conclusion I am just fat lol.
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-t...losing-weight/

    (Original post by F_shakeey)
    Invest in a private pool mate and watch how those moobs turn into muscle
    Swimming doesn't build muscle.
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    Thanks you have actually inspired even more so.
    Just one thing .. should I start the exercise straight away along with the crunch in the diet?
    You're welcome brah.

    This is up to you. Personally, I would start with only the diet first (remember you need a calorie deficit, but don't starve yourself, since this is actually counterproductive since your body will retain the fat), as building muscle is hard on a calorie deficit.

    Once a bit of fat has gone, then I would start exercising, and couple this with eating more protein to give your muscles the nutrients they need to grow, firming your chest up while losing fat (you will still need to be on a calorie deficit when you start working out). Some people would argue that it would be best to diet until all the excess fat on your chest has gone, then hit the weights and start packing muscle on, but this takes more time. If you can build muscle very easily, then I would suggest hitting the weights straight away, but few people have the right genetics for this.

    Remember, you have to be very strict with your diet from now on. It will be tough, and the first few weeks you will feel like giving up, but you have to push on. Remember not to skip meals or starve yourself under any circumstances (bear in mind, starving does not mean "being hungry more often than usual"), since your body will go into survival mode and hold onto its fat reserves for dear life. Get into your diet slowly, starting with small steps (cutting out junk food, and trying your best not to drink too much alcohol), to bigger steps (eating good carbs and fats, getting more protein from healthier sources, etc.).

    Bear in mind that working your chest out will not "target" the fat on your chest; to decrease the amount of fat on a certain body part, you must lower your overall body fat.

    A lot of people on here will tell you to do cardio. While I agree that it is excellent for cardiovascular health and losing weight, it isn't essential, since it is just burning calories (which you won't have to do if you start to eat very sensibly from now on).

    This might all sound like a lot to take in at once, so let me condense it into these simple rules:
    1. Eat better; no junk food, bad sugars/carbs or salt. Fizzy drinks, cakes and sweets are your worst enemies
    2. Drink plenty of water (with the possible exception of skimmed milk, it is the only beverage you will ever need!)
    3. Eat smaller portions, don't skip breakfast, eat plenty of protein, and make sure you are creating a calorie deficit (do not overdo this "deficit", but try to aim for 500 less calories than you would normally eat per day)
    4. Work out with weights, focusing on your chest and legs (you may want to work your arms, back and abs out too)
    5. Never, ever give up.

    Good luck
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    (Original post by NeonSkies)
    Ahhh fair enough. The way I read it made me think you meant starving yourself, then exercising!

    I didn't think it was you negging but I was just wondering why someone would, nevermind lol.
    Haha no way. Calorie deficit =/= starvation, it simply means eating less calories than your body burns each day (so your body will dig into its fat reserves for energy). If you starve yourself, your body will burn muscle and hold onto its precious energy-rich fat supplies, which would be counterproductive in the OP's case.
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    (Original post by AmericanPsycho)
    You're welcome brah.

    This is up to you. Personally, I would start with only the diet first (remember you need a calorie deficit, but don't starve yourself, since this is actually counterproductive since your body will retain the fat), as building muscle is hard on a calorie deficit.

    Once a bit of fat has gone, then I would start exercising, and couple this with eating more protein to give your muscles the nutrients they need to grow, firming your chest up while losing fat (you will still need to be on a calorie deficit when you start working out). Some people would argue that it would be best to diet until all the excess fat on your chest has gone, then hit the weights and start packing muscle on, but this takes more time. If you can build muscle very easily, then I would suggest hitting the weights straight away, but few people have the right genetics for this.

    Remember, you have to be very strict with your diet from now on. It will be tough, and the first few weeks you will feel like giving up, but you have to push on. Remember not to skip meals or starve yourself under any circumstances (bear in mind, starving does not mean "being hungry more often than usual"), since your body will go into survival mode and hold onto its fat reserves for dear life. Get into your diet slowly, starting with small steps (cutting out junk food, and trying your best not to drink too much alcohol), to bigger steps (eating good carbs and fats, getting more protein from healthier sources, etc.).

    Bear in mind that working your chest out will not "target" the fat on your chest; to decrease the amount of fat on a certain body part, you must lower your overall body fat.

    A lot of people on here will tell you to do cardio. While I agree that it is excellent for cardiovascular health and losing weight, it isn't essential, since it is just burning calories (which you won't have to do if you start to eat very sensibly from now on).

    This might all sound like a lot to take in at once, so let me condense it into these simple rules:
    1. Eat better; no junk food, bad sugars/carbs or salt. Fizzy drinks, cakes and sweets are your worst enemies
    2. Drink plenty of water (with the possible exception of skimmed milk, it is the only beverage you will ever need!)
    3. Eat smaller portions, don't skip breakfast, eat plenty of protein, and make sure you are creating a calorie deficit (do not overdo this "deficit", but try to aim for 500 less calories than you would normally eat per day)
    4. Work out with weights, focusing on your chest and legs (you may want to work your arms, back and abs out too)
    5. Never, ever give up.

    Good luck
    This is really great thanks.
    How long did it take for you, when should I start seeing results?
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    (Original post by AmericanPsycho)
    You're welcome brah.

    This is up to you. Personally, I would start with only the diet first (remember you need a calorie deficit, but don't starve yourself, since this is actually counterproductive since your body will retain the fat), as building muscle is hard on a calorie deficit.

    Once a bit of fat has gone, then I would start exercising, and couple this with eating more protein to give your muscles the nutrients they need to grow, firming your chest up while losing fat (you will still need to be on a calorie deficit when you start working out). Some people would argue that it would be best to diet until all the excess fat on your chest has gone, then hit the weights and start packing muscle on, but this takes more time. If you can build muscle very easily, then I would suggest hitting the weights straight away, but few people have the right genetics for this.

    Remember, you have to be very strict with your diet from now on. It will be tough, and the first few weeks you will feel like giving up, but you have to push on. Remember not to skip meals or starve yourself under any circumstances (bear in mind, starving does not mean "being hungry more often than usual"), since your body will go into survival mode and hold onto its fat reserves for dear life. Get into your diet slowly, starting with small steps (cutting out junk food, and trying your best not to drink too much alcohol), to bigger steps (eating good carbs and fats, getting more protein from healthier sources, etc.).

    Bear in mind that working your chest out will not "target" the fat on your chest; to decrease the amount of fat on a certain body part, you must lower your overall body fat.

    A lot of people on here will tell you to do cardio. While I agree that it is excellent for cardiovascular health and losing weight, it isn't essential, since it is just burning calories (which you won't have to do if you start to eat very sensibly from now on).

    This might all sound like a lot to take in at once, so let me condense it into these simple rules:
    1. Eat better; no junk food, bad sugars/carbs or salt. Fizzy drinks, cakes and sweets are your worst enemies
    2. Drink plenty of water (with the possible exception of skimmed milk, it is the only beverage you will ever need!)
    3. Eat smaller portions, don't skip breakfast, eat plenty of protein, and make sure you are creating a calorie deficit (do not overdo this "deficit", but try to aim for 500 less calories than you would normally eat per day)
    4. Work out with weights, focusing on your chest and legs (you may want to work your arms, back and abs out too)
    5. Never, ever give up.

    Good luck
    I need some clarification regarding the 4th point, when you start working with weights focusing chest or any other region , is it ok to work out everyday ? ( 7 days a week ) or do we need to rest that region regularly? like alternate days ?
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    (Original post by Zinio)
    I need some clarification regarding the 4th point, when you start working with weights focusing chest or any other region , is it ok to work out everyday ? ( 7 days a week ) or do we need to rest that region regularly? like alternate days ?
    It is highly recommended that you don't work out the same muscle group more than once every 48 hours. When you lift heavy weights, the fibres in your muscles tear. They will recover and grow back (stronger than before) provided that you give them rest. If you work out the same muscles every day, you will limit the amount of progress you can make, since your muscles aren't getting enough recovery time.

    Technically, it is ok to work out every day, so long as you do not work out the same muscle groups two days in a row. If you were wanted to really focus on your arms, you could work them out on monday (for example), then focus on your legs on tuesday, before working your arms again on wednesday.

    If you really want to see big gains, you have to work out as many different muscle groups as possible. Your body dislikes imbalances, and if it feels that your upper body is getting a lot of stimulation but your lower body is being neglected in workouts, you won't grow as much as you could if you were working both upper and lower body muscles.

    While it is ok to work out several days a week (providing each muscle group gets adequate rest), many bodybuilders recommend taking at least one days rest from the gym per week.
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    This is really great thanks.
    How long did it take for you, when should I start seeing results?
    I used to comfort eat a lot as a kid and didn't get much exercise, so I was on the larger side. I wasn't fat, but my physique wasn't what it is now. I first started working out when I was about 16, but I didn't know what I was really doing and I didn't go regularly. When I went to a new school which had a gym nearby, I was going 5 days a week since the school gave discounts on membership.

    I am pretty lucky to have good genetics and am naturally fairly muscular, so I got sucked into going to the gym quite a lot and found it easy to make quick progress. I was still a complete novice, since my workouts had no real structure, and I always used machines instead of free weights, but over about three months I packed on some serious muscle. I also quit having junk food, chocolate, fizzy drinks, etc. and was eating big nutritious school meals packed with protein every day, but I didn't realise the importance of diet until much later. I made the mistake of not having a "cutting" phase (dieting), so my I had plenty of muscle but some of it was lying behind fat, so technically I still had "moobs" for months due to lots of excess fat, but nobody could really tell. However, this was pretty irrelevant, since all the muscle gain sent my metabolism up, and the fat was slowly drained away since I just kept working out more and more, so I never really lost muscle.

    I am now 18 and flirting with the idea of "cutting". I still have some belly fat I want to cut down to get extra ripped in time for summer, but I keep going to the gym and eating plenty of protein to ensure I don't lose much muscle through my calorie deficit.

    Bear in mind this is a different context to most people, since not everyone has the leisure of going to the gym 5 times a week and being as reckless as I was with my workouts and dieting. To this day I still have some fat over my chest area, but there is also a lot of muscle there too. I recommend that you don't take a leaf out of my book,
    since I have my genetics to thank rather than the fairly clueless, disorientated plan I followed in the past.

    As for when you'll see results, it depends on how strict you are with your diet, what your genetics are like, and how much working out you choose to do. I would say at least a few months, but it could be less, and it could be more. One of the rules a lot of bodybuilders live by is "it's not how long it takes to get to the end, but rather how good the end result is".
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    Just wanted you lot to know I have signed up to the local gym and have been given a training schedule and a diet plan, thanks a lot for the input guys. Especially American Psycho.
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    Just wanted you lot to know I have signed up to the local gym and have been given a training schedule and a diet plan, thanks a lot for the input guys. Especially American Psycho.
    That's it mate go 4 it !
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    http://www.scoobysworkshop.com/Weigh...essStories.htm

    Check that guy's website out. It's geat, and he made several workout plans for weight loss / muscle gain, and has made hundreds of videos showing you what to do for every suggested exercise.
 
 
 
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