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    (Original post by haj1989)
    Ah, thanks for letting me know, that's a small relief at least. So even if the AS I did in chemistry was 3 years ago, I should (after refreshing my knowledge on the subject over the course of the summer), be able to sit it next year? My back up plan is to do an MA in Medical Anthropology which my department here are keen for me to do, so that gives me a year of doing something productive. In that year I'll also do some quality work experience and sort out my chemistry A-level before applying. When you say 'cash in', do you also mean that, say if I got 270/300 at AS, that individual mark will still count towards my overall /600 total, or not?

    THanks for all the help!

    EDIT: If that is the case, then presumably one could either do Edexcel or OCR chemistry based on which offered all coursework and exams, but no practicals (as obviously if I had to do a practical exam it would be hard to arrange for such). I would say OCR will have more material that I will remember though.

    http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications...e/chemistry_a/
    If you click in specification and scroll down, it discusses the three A2 modules, one of which is 'practical skills in chemistry 2'. IS this possible to do without needing lab equipment? It does say coursework, and so I am presuming this is not a timed practical, however this could create issues, and so perhaps I should look at AQA and Edexcel also to see if they offer A2 exams but without the practical exam?
    you take whatever UMS you got in total for your AS and it is put towards your A2 in the same way as it would if you were just working through the whole A-level. i'm not certain if this is a general rule but my college allow it so it's definitely possible!
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    (Original post by schizopear)
    you take whatever UMS you got in total for your AS and it is put towards your A2 in the same way as it would if you were just working through the whole A-level. i'm not certain if this is a general rule but my college allow it so it's definitely possible!
    So as a graduate did you have to do the practical exams back at your college again? Would the OCR board arrange an examination and practical venue for me if I paid? I'm also wondering how far in advance I have to book to take the exams as I feel I could work for it over the summer and take the exams in January, then if something went wrong I would have June also!
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    (Original post by haj1989)
    So as a graduate did you have to do the practical exams back at your college again? Would the OCR board arrange an examination and practical venue for me if I paid? I'm also wondering how far in advance I have to book to take the exams as I feel I could work for it over the summer and take the exams in January, then if something went wrong I would have June also!
    i can't really help you i'm afraid as i went back to college full-time to do my A-levels. i considered sitting them as a private candidate but it seemed just as expensive and more hassle than going back to college, plus i didn't fancy self-teaching chemistry and physics when i'd not studied them for nearly a decade!

    if you contact OCR they might be able to give you a list of centres that might take you. good luck!
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    (Original post by schizopear)
    i can't really help you i'm afraid as i went back to college full-time to do my A-levels. i considered sitting them as a private candidate but it seemed just as expensive and more hassle than going back to college, plus i didn't fancy self-teaching chemistry and physics when i'd not studied them for nearly a decade!

    if you contact OCR they might be able to give you a list of centres that might take you. good luck!
    Thanks again! I think I may have found somewhere offering the Edexcel A2 Chemistry course with practical assessment. There's no issue with mixing syllabus between AS and A2, is there? I presume I can still 'cash-in' having done OCR AS?
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    (Original post by haj1989)
    Thanks again! I think I may have found somewhere offering the Edexcel A2 Chemistry course with practical assessment. There's no issue with mixing syllabus between AS and A2, is there? I presume I can still 'cash-in' having done OCR AS?
    yes, you can have done the AS with any exam board i found this for edexcel about transferring.
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    (Original post by schizopear)
    yes, you can have done the AS with any exam board i found this for edexcel about transferring.
    But to confirm, did you say you did both AS and A2 again, or just A2? There are people on another chemistry thread telling me they doubt I could cash in the AS result from 2008 (i think that was the year),with the A2 from next year which I will hopefully get - but that I should be able to take the A2 having done an AS already and that both will remain separate so I have done AS and A2 but it is still not an A-level per se?

    I really don't want to have to do AS and A2 together, but I presume vet med schools would understand such a situation and view the AS and A2 done separately in a similar light to an A-level done in the regular two year period? Or would this not be the case?

    It seems I may have to do the A2 practical work in a pricey course offered by one of the London colleges, but as I said I do have the full financial support of my parents for which I feel very fortunate. OR, my college may offer me some alternative and allow me to the practical work there. Any further advice from people who have been through what I am about to over the next year, would be greatly appreciated!

    P.s. rather than doing an MA in anthropology up here in Durham, my parents are able to arrange for me to get work experience on and off over the next year before I apply for Vet med with one of the leading Equine vets in the country. I would imagine this can only be a highly positive thing for my application next year as this would combine both a farm and clinical setting.
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    Thanks for all the help! I seem to have managed to sort it out with my old college, thank goodness! Now for my next question: The BMAT! Have you lot found it forms an important role in RVS and other vet med schools or not so much? I'm going to start looking over material for the BMAT now as I have nothing else to do until graduation (go my 2:1 result today, so pleased with that).

    H
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    (Original post by haj1989)
    Thanks for all the help! I seem to have managed to sort it out with my old college, thank goodness! Now for my next question: The BMAT! Have you lot found it forms an important role in RVS and other vet med schools or not so much? I'm going to start looking over material for the BMAT now as I have nothing else to do until graduation (go my 2:1 result today, so pleased with that).

    H
    Just thought I'd offer some advice on the BMAT. :-)

    Don't underestimate the importance of the BMAT for RVC. They do have a cut off for it. They will only interview x number of people with the top scores. The actual scores will vary year to year as the paper varies. So if next years paper is harder than this years was, then chances are everybody will score lower, so by picking the top however many 100 to interview their scores will also be lower. As far as I know Cambridge are the only other vet school who use it atm (I heard Bristol might be looking at it...but I don't know for def). I don't know how much Cambridge use it either.

    Having said that....it is a hard exam - it is aimed at people applying for vet med/med, people who are good academically, so will feel a lot harder than an alevel which is aimed at everyone with grades from A-E. So don't be too worried if it feels really hard/like you don't know a lot of it!

    For the science section - it is def worth getting hold of some GCSE revision guides (libraries often have them), as that is the level of it. Most people with degrees though have specialised down now to the point where they are forgotten GCSE physics/maths etc! Your score in the science section can be improved just be recapping this stuff. Then play to your strengths in the exam - don't speed ages trying to solve a maths question if that is your weak point etc. I went through an answered all the bio and chem ones first (as I knew I should be able to get a lot of them right), then worked out the maths and finally guessed the physics ones (which I am clueless about!) Since you will probably be pushed for time in it, at least that way you are saving your rushed work/guessing for the ones you were less likely to get right anyway!

    The next section...can't remember what it's called...is the logic/reasoning type section. Do past papers/buy some books off amazon and work through these type of questions, many have a similar kind of style, so once you get the hang of the style it makes it much easier.

    For the essay section, I found the hardest thing was fitting everything I wanted to say into the space allowed! Go back to GCSE English type idea - balanced argument. Whatever the question is give for's/against's and your own opinion. Best thing for this is to practice fitting your ideas into the space in the time...just write lots of mini essays! Again, past papers/books are good for example questions.
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    I completely agree with everything you've said here, I definitely underestimated the BMAT. I looked over some old A-level revision books, but assumed because I was on a 1st at Uni, I'd be fine... how wrong I was. Shamefully, the science section was my worst bit!


    (Original post by kookabura)
    As far as I know Cambridge are the only other vet school who use it atm I don't know how much Cambridge use it either.
    Judging by my abysmal attempt at the BMAT, Cambridge don't use it as a cut off point Although I did above average in the aptitude and logic section, so maybe they favour other sections as oppose to RVC who regard the science section particularly highly. Cambridge interview as many candidates with the correct A-level (or degree) grades as they can, so from my experience, it's more important to 'wow' them at interview than do exceedingly well in the BMAT... it's probably more of a marker to distinguish between two very similar candidates.

    That said - DO WELL IN THE BMAT! It will make life much less stressful
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    (Original post by Erin01)
    I completely agree with everything you've said here, I definitely underestimated the BMAT. I looked over some old A-level revision books, but assumed because I was on a 1st at Uni, I'd be fine... how wrong I was. Shamefully, the science section was my worst bit!




    Judging by my abysmal attempt at the BMAT, Cambridge don't use it as a cut off point Although I did above average in the aptitude and logic section, so maybe they favour other sections as oppose to RVC who regard the science section particularly highly. Cambridge interview as many candidates with the correct A-level (or degree) grades as they can, so from my experience, it's more important to 'wow' them at interview than do exceedingly well in the BMAT... it's probably more of a marker to distinguish between two very similar candidates.

    That said - DO WELL IN THE BMAT! It will make life much less stressful

    Thanks again for the advice. I understand if I was to apply to Cambridge and RVS that the BMAT would play some sort of a role, however for Edinburgh/Glasgow and Nottingham (four universities is the most I can apply to, right?), I suppose as they don't go on the BMAT other factors will become more important? That said, i'll get cracking with working on the BMAT alongside the chemistry and work experience.

    EDIT: Yikes! I think me and the BMAT really won't mix! I reckon it may be better for me to be safe than sorry and simply leave Cambridge and RVS out of my application and focus on Bristol, Nottingham, Edinburgh and Glasgow/Liverpool instead and focus on my A2 Chemistry and getting a heap of work experience over the coming year. Am I right in thinking it is a maximum of four universities one is allowed to apply to for veterinary medicine?
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    (Original post by haj1989)
    Thanks again for the advice. I understand if I was to apply to Cambridge and RVS that the BMAT would play some sort of a role, however for Edinburgh/Glasgow and Nottingham (four universities is the most I can apply to, right?), I suppose as they don't go on the BMAT other factors will become more important? That said, i'll get cracking with working on the BMAT alongside the chemistry and work experience.

    EDIT: Yikes! I think me and the BMAT really won't mix! I reckon it may be better for me to be safe than sorry and simply leave Cambridge and RVS out of my application and focus on Bristol, Nottingham, Edinburgh and Glasgow/Liverpool instead and focus on my A2 Chemistry and getting a heap of work experience over the coming year. Am I right in thinking it is a maximum of four universities one is allowed to apply to for veterinary medicine?
    btw...just to be picky...it's RVC (Royal Veterinary College) not RVS!

    Yep...four uni's for vet med.
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    Hi my names Amy I'm hopefully applying to do veterinary at RVC and nottingham at the end of my animal science course at nottingham, any body have any advice regarding fees or anything?!
    Also what are everyones A-levels and how much do they affect applications? Ive got BCC in biology chemistry and maths. Im retaking some modules in chemistry and biology atm to try and get my grades up to ABC alongside doing first year undergraduate exams!
    thankss
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    (Original post by 8551amy)
    Hi my names Amy I'm hopefully applying to do veterinary at RVC and nottingham at the end of my animal science course at nottingham, any body have any advice regarding fees or anything?!
    Also what are everyones A-levels and how much do they affect applications? Ive got BCC in biology chemistry and maths. Im retaking some modules in chemistry and biology atm to try and get my grades up to ABC alongside doing first year undergraduate exams!
    thankss
    Hi,

    I did Animal Science at Nottingham (graduated a few years ago now though.....) and am now at RVC. I'm on the four year grad course here, as the Animal Science course is deemed relevant enough that you don't have to do the 5 year course (doesn't mean that it will be easy though!!!)

    Urm...about fees...can't really say much other than what you probably already know judging from your choice of uni's to apply to. Nottingham seem to take very, very, few graduates each year (even out of the Nottingham lot that apply) so RVC seems to end up being most grad's one to pin their hopes on! Which unfortunately means it then ends up pretty competitive! Obviously know the fees are £9000 it is making it harder and harder for people to work out how to feasibly fund them.

    For a second degree you can only get a maintenance loan (which will barely, cover accommodation costs), so you will have to work out how to fund your fees yourself. Bank loans are pretty much a no go as a student, career development loans are harder to get now - most banks have stopped doing them. Sponsorship/funding is hard to get anything worthwhile - one of my housemates is hugely proactive with applying for things like this and has managed to get a grant for £800 this year and had a couple of hundred last year, from applying for loads. So in reality you won't get enough to fund a year, let alone four. Don't rely on working through your course - I've fitted in bits and pieces of work, but pretty much just enough to help fund a bit of a social life and help pay for petrol to placements. And it has been hard even doing that - I scraped through last year and this year, and it has definitely been a balance of I can't afford to be here if I don't work, but if I work too much I'll fail, so won't be here!! I know this probably sounds negative, and you are already heading down the second degree route, but there is no point hoping in things that won't work out. I know some people in my year at Nottm has rose tinted ideas of getting sponsorship and grants to cover it...even with the lower fees that was never going to happen.

    I got in with BBC in my alevels and didn't redo any. There are some people in my year who retook some/all of an alevel (or more than one) but equally plenty of people who didn't. More and more people seem to be doing that though, so I guess it can only be a positive and help keep you inline with what some other applicants will be doing. But...don't do it at risk to your degree, getting a 2:1 or 1st is much more important.

    You'll have to fit in doing some work experience as well (as anything you had pre nottingham uni will be a bit too old to count really). And unless the course has changed a lot since I was there, you won't really get enough hands on stuff to count as work experience from the course itself.

    When you finally get round to your year of applying, as I have said in posts about yours, don't underestimate the BMAT for RVC. It is important, and will test stuff you won't have looked at for a few years!!

    err...can't think of anything else useful to say now, let me know if you've got any more questions though!
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    (Original post by kookabura)
    Hi,

    I did Animal Science at Nottingham (graduated a few years ago now though.....) and am now at RVC. I'm on the four year grad course here, as the Animal Science course is deemed relevant enough that you don't have to do the 5 year course (doesn't mean that it will be easy though!!!)

    Urm...about fees...can't really say much other than what you probably already know judging from your choice of uni's to apply to. Nottingham seem to take very, very, few graduates each year (even out of the Nottingham lot that apply) so RVC seems to end up being most grad's one to pin their hopes on! Which unfortunately means it then ends up pretty competitive! Obviously know the fees are £9000 it is making it harder and harder for people to work out how to feasibly fund them.

    For a second degree you can only get a maintenance loan (which will barely, cover accommodation costs), so you will have to work out how to fund your fees yourself. Bank loans are pretty much a no go as a student, career development loans are harder to get now - most banks have stopped doing them. Sponsorship/funding is hard to get anything worthwhile - one of my housemates is hugely proactive with applying for things like this and has managed to get a grant for £800 this year and had a couple of hundred last year, from applying for loads. So in reality you won't get enough to fund a year, let alone four. Don't rely on working through your course - I've fitted in bits and pieces of work, but pretty much just enough to help fund a bit of a social life and help pay for petrol to placements. And it has been hard even doing that - I scraped through last year and this year, and it has definitely been a balance of I can't afford to be here if I don't work, but if I work too much I'll fail, so won't be here!! I know this probably sounds negative, and you are already heading down the second degree route, but there is no point hoping in things that won't work out. I know some people in my year at Nottm has rose tinted ideas of getting sponsorship and grants to cover it...even with the lower fees that was never going to happen.

    I got in with BBC in my alevels and didn't redo any. There are some people in my year who retook some/all of an alevel (or more than one) but equally plenty of people who didn't. More and more people seem to be doing that though, so I guess it can only be a positive and help keep you inline with what some other applicants will be doing. But...don't do it at risk to your degree, getting a 2:1 or 1st is much more important.

    You'll have to fit in doing some work experience as well (as anything you had pre nottingham uni will be a bit too old to count really). And unless the course has changed a lot since I was there, you won't really get enough hands on stuff to count as work experience from the course itself.

    When you finally get round to your year of applying, as I have said in posts about yours, don't underestimate the BMAT for RVC. It is important, and will test stuff you won't have looked at for a few years!!

    err...can't think of anything else useful to say now, let me know if you've got any more questions though!
    Thankyou for taking the time to respond to me, if you dont mind me asking what Alevels did you take and what grade did you get for your degree? Its quite reassuring to know that somebody has got a place with similar alevels to me! and are you commuting from home to uni or are you living there? I live in london anyway so if i was to go to RVC (which is my main aim to be honest) then im hoping that living at home will cut some of the costs! Also, on the rvc website it says that 4 weeks of work experience is required, did you do more than 4 weeks? And what unis did you apply to and what ones did you get offers/interviews for?
    Also regarding the BMAT, im quite worried about that I've heard its really hard have you got any advice for preperations?
    Sorry hundreds of questions!
    Thanks
    Amy
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    (Original post by haj1989)
    There's no issue on the financing side!
    Then I would suggest applying to Edinburgh. It's the most expensive grad course but there have been people on here who have been accepted without the standard A levels (i.e. chemistry) as far as I can remember

    No personal experience but that's what I've read on here

    Good luck
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    (Original post by clair0511)
    Then I would suggest applying to Edinburgh. It's the most expensive grad course but there have been people on here who have been accepted without the standard A levels (i.e. chemistry) as far as I can remember

    No personal experience but that's what I've read on here

    Good luck
    Fair enough, regardless I'll have to do A2 chemistry as I want to apply to more than one uni for vet med obviously! It does still seem to say on the website that they require Chemistry and Biology at A-level.
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    Eurgh, just received the following reply from someone at OCR: "Legacy and current specifications for A level cannot be mixed regardless that it was never cashed in. You will need to take the whole of the current A level in order to achieve the full grade".

    Does that mean I would have to take both AS and A2, or do you think I would be OK just taking A2 and treating them as separate specifications? What do you lot make of this? Has anyone mixed AS and A2 levels which were years apart? I think my AS was back in 2008.

    EDIT: Guess it wouldn't hurt to do both AS and A2 again anyway! Do you reckon I could do the majority of the exams in January?
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    Spoken to my teacher and looks like I will have to do both AS and A2! Oh well!
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    (Original post by 8551amy)
    Thankyou for taking the time to respond to me, if you dont mind me asking what Alevels did you take and what grade did you get for your degree? Its quite reassuring to know that somebody has got a place with similar alevels to me! and are you commuting from home to uni or are you living there? I live in london anyway so if i was to go to RVC (which is my main aim to be honest) then im hoping that living at home will cut some of the costs! Also, on the rvc website it says that 4 weeks of work experience is required, did you do more than 4 weeks? And what unis did you apply to and what ones did you get offers/interviews for?
    Also regarding the BMAT, im quite worried about that I've heard its really hard have you got any advice for preperations?
    Sorry hundreds of questions!
    Thanks
    Amy
    I got BBC in my alevels (Bio, Chem, Maths), and a 2:1 in my degree. Home for me is Nottingham, so when I was at SB I lived in halls for the first year, but them moved back home in my 2nd and 3rd year, to try and save some money for vet med. I applied to Nottingham, RVC, Edinburgh and Liverpool. In reality I could only afford RVC or Nottm, but I was 99% sure I would get an offer from Edinburgh pretty early on - so that was mainly for the psychological boost knowing I had one offer would be. I hoped I would get an interview at Liverpool first as interview practice, but that actually was my last interview, so kind of pointless! I got an interview, but no offer from Nottm (I really have no clue what they want from their grad applicants!) and then an interview and offer from RVC. Even though London is pretty expensive to live in, it worked out (alot) cheaper for me than Liverpool or Edinburgh where I just simply wouldn't be able to pay the fees!

    I lived in halls at RVC in my first year here - but people live all over. Particularly people on the grad/4 year course as people are that bit older, so a lot of people don't want to do the whole halls thing again, there are also people with partners/children/pets, so live elsewhere, but in general it means that you won't be the only one not living in halls! Most people then move out to Potters Bar (or surrounding areas) in the last three years of the course. Depending where you live in London that may be commutable, but I would def say by the time you are on rotations (so last year and a half) you could do with living closer by. On some rotations you have to be within a certain time limit - so some people just spend that time crashing at friends houses/making friends with someone who lives on campus! But it would def be easier for all of them to be closer by, I know I wouldn't want to trek halfway across London after finishing a night shift! But its up to you...and you could obviously decide to just move to Potters Bar for the last bit of your course if you wanted (btw..the rent is a bit cheaper than 'normal' london prices in Potters Bar, which makes it a bit better!)

    I had more than 4 weeks experience - but partly because I didn't apply straight from my other degree - for various reasons I ended up with a couple of years out in between, so figured I should make it look like I had been productive with my time! You do need to get at least the four weeks, places do realise that it isn't easy getting experience whilst you are at uni - so wont expect months! Long term things often look good - as it shows long term commitment - so a saturday morning at a vets for a year, or one evening a week at a stables/kennels etc...shouldn't eat into your degree/work time too much, but would help build up a bit more experience. Also, you can pre count up to 6 weeks animal husbandry experience at RVC from your 1st year requirements (if you are on the 4 year course), so it isnt a total 'waste', if you have done 2 weeks at a stable for example - you could count that and not have to do it again when at RVC - if that makes sense?

    BMAT wise, I can't really add much more to my response in a post a few up from this one (in reply to haj1989). It is hard, but it is meant to be, everyone finds it hard. With some preparation for it you shouldn't find it impossible though. You just need to be organised, as it is in the Nov (I think!) of the year you apply, so Nov of third year, when you also need to be working at your degree and getting a 2:1/1st...so do some preparation for it over the summer or something. Dont expect to be ok on the science because you are doing a science degree...its on GCSE stuff, so you will need to remember things you haven't looked at for several years!!

    errr, think thats answered all your q's. let me know if you have anymore! good luck!
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    (Original post by kookabura)
    I got BBC in my alevels (Bio, Chem, Maths), and a 2:1 in my degree. Home for me is Nottingham, so when I was at SB I lived in halls for the first year, but them moved back home in my 2nd and 3rd year, to try and save some money for vet med. I applied to Nottingham, RVC, Edinburgh and Liverpool. In reality I could only afford RVC or Nottm, but I was 99% sure I would get an offer from Edinburgh pretty early on - so that was mainly for the psychological boost knowing I had one offer would be. I hoped I would get an interview at Liverpool first as interview practice, but that actually was my last interview, so kind of pointless! I got an interview, but no offer from Nottm (I really have no clue what they want from their grad applicants!) and then an interview and offer from RVC. Even though London is pretty expensive to live in, it worked out (alot) cheaper for me than Liverpool or Edinburgh where I just simply wouldn't be able to pay the fees!

    I lived in halls at RVC in my first year here - but people live all over. Particularly people on the grad/4 year course as people are that bit older, so a lot of people don't want to do the whole halls thing again, there are also people with partners/children/pets, so live elsewhere, but in general it means that you won't be the only one not living in halls! Most people then move out to Potters Bar (or surrounding areas) in the last three years of the course. Depending where you live in London that may be commutable, but I would def say by the time you are on rotations (so last year and a half) you could do with living closer by. On some rotations you have to be within a certain time limit - so some people just spend that time crashing at friends houses/making friends with someone who lives on campus! But it would def be easier for all of them to be closer by, I know I wouldn't want to trek halfway across London after finishing a night shift! But its up to you...and you could obviously decide to just move to Potters Bar for the last bit of your course if you wanted (btw..the rent is a bit cheaper than 'normal' london prices in Potters Bar, which makes it a bit better!)

    I had more than 4 weeks experience - but partly because I didn't apply straight from my other degree - for various reasons I ended up with a couple of years out in between, so figured I should make it look like I had been productive with my time! You do need to get at least the four weeks, places do realise that it isn't easy getting experience whilst you are at uni - so wont expect months! Long term things often look good - as it shows long term commitment - so a saturday morning at a vets for a year, or one evening a week at a stables/kennels etc...shouldn't eat into your degree/work time too much, but would help build up a bit more experience. Also, you can pre count up to 6 weeks animal husbandry experience at RVC from your 1st year requirements (if you are on the 4 year course), so it isnt a total 'waste', if you have done 2 weeks at a stable for example - you could count that and not have to do it again when at RVC - if that makes sense?

    BMAT wise, I can't really add much more to my response in a post a few up from this one (in reply to haj1989). It is hard, but it is meant to be, everyone finds it hard. With some preparation for it you shouldn't find it impossible though. You just need to be organised, as it is in the Nov (I think!) of the year you apply, so Nov of third year, when you also need to be working at your degree and getting a 2:1/1st...so do some preparation for it over the summer or something. Dont expect to be ok on the science because you are doing a science degree...its on GCSE stuff, so you will need to remember things you haven't looked at for several years!!

    errr, think thats answered all your q's. let me know if you have anymore! good luck!
    I think that you covered pretty much all of my questions, thankyou very much for your help, its really useful speaking to somebody who has already been there, I will definately take on board your advice!
 
 
 
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