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    Hello!

    I'm finding this question really hard, could someone please show me how to do it please, I have really good knowledge balancing redox but I just don't understand this one because Cl and Na are present in two of the products :O.

    Cl2+NaOH--------> NaClO3 + NaCl + H2O

    Thank you SO much!
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    3Cl2 + 6NaOH -> NaClO3 + 5NaCl + 3H2O

    It helps to work out the water first.
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    I believe it would just be simply

    3Cl2 + 6NaOH ----> NaClO3 + 5NaCl +3H2O

    I could be wrong but i don't think i am in this case.
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    (Original post by FXL5)
    3Cl2 + 6NaOH -> NaClO3 + 5NaCl + 3H2O

    It helps to work out the water first.
    SNAP lmao posted pretty much the exact same time
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    Omg THANK YOU! So there's no need for the working out two half eqations etc? How do I know when I need to do half equations and when I just need to balance atoms?
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    If you can do the maths in your head, there's almost never a need to do the half equations. It just makes the maths simpler, especially on larger ones or where there are a lot of different charges, especially if something disproportionates and you need to make sure you got it right.

    That said, it's often specified that you have to show the half equations, if it's being tested, so you ought to know how.
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    Hold on, in the question it says "use oxidation states to balance the following equations."
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    Right, that would be an example of my last sentence.

    Frankly, just label all the charges/OS and show that the electrons match up. You have the question AND the answer, the working should just fall into place.
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    where does the 3 oxygens in the NaCLO3 come from?

    surely you couldn't have a neutral charge on that compound because NA is 1+, Cl 1- and 3 Oxygens -6 so it would be a compound with a -6 charge which would make redox not work because chlorine would have to have an oxidation state of +5 if you see what I mean? Like if i was working out a half equation for the Cl2 to CL- sorta? :|

    In any case, could someone please tell me what happens to OH- ions in redox? Like, what to do with it in a half equation, where you have OH- on one side and then on the other it's turned into water or something? I think i'm good with every other part of redox.

    Thanks
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    That is correct, chlorine forms oxidation states 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, and -1. -1, 5, and 7 are the most stable, -1 is the most common. 6 and 2 are almost unknown - I can't think of any examples.
 
 
 
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