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    hey ..
    say u had a list of reactions, and there E
    how would you work out which reaction is better at say giving a higher concentration of Fe2+ ions...
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    (Original post by ben10)
    hey ..
    say u had a list of reactions, and there E
    how would you work out which reaction is better at say giving a higher concentration of Fe2+ ions...
    Hey ben

    I cant really understand your question. By E do you mean energy of cell potential, or something else?

    And by giving a concentration of Fe 2+ ions i really dont know what your getting at :s. Try rephrasing and perhaps giving an example and i'll probably be able to help
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    (Original post by Blocker)
    Hey ben

    I cant really understand your question. By E do you mean energy of cell potential, or something else?

    And by giving a concentration of Fe 2+ ions i really dont know what your getting at :s. Try rephrasing and perhaps giving an example and i'll probably be able to help
    u know in chemistry ure given a table of E values. electrode potential things..
    and the question gave u a series of chemical reactions
    and u had to use the E values and say which reaction would produce a higher concentration of a particular product..

    would i have to work out the emf??
    or just look at which reacttion has a more positive E value ??
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    Righty, im with you.

    You've more or less answered your own question. The emf of the reaction is the same as the sum of those E values for the two half reactions in your system [E total = E reduction - E oxidation]. The more positive this overall potential is, the more favourable your reaction and the more product you'll get.
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    (Original post by Blocker)
    Righty, im with you.

    You've more or less answered your own question. The emf of the reaction is the same as the sum of those E values for the two half reactions in your system [E total = E reduction - E oxidation]. The more positive this overall potential is, the more favourable your reaction and the more product you'll get.
    yeah but im confused because im i supposed to work out the cel EMF

    or just go with the E values they give me , look for the more positive and then just say more positive hence more product
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    Can you perhaps show me some of the E values they give and the associated reaction, and the question theyre asking?
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    i dont have anything like that .. i just came across that question.. so i thought id post it on the forum
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    (Original post by Blocker)
    Can you perhaps show me some of the E values they give and the associated reaction, and the question theyre asking?
    i dont have anything like that .. i just came across that question.. so i thought id post it on the forum
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    (Original post by ben10)
    i dont have anything like that .. i just came across that question.. so i thought id post it on the forum
    also could yu help me on this question
    how to differentiate between chlropropane and ethanoyl chloride using silver nitrate ?
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    I cant really do much without details, as its all a bit too vague. Google "cell potential chemguide" for a handy reference on such things though, that site in general is brilliant for a level stuff.

    As for the second question, i can help with that.

    Imagine adding aqueous silver nitrate to the compounds in question. Silver nitrate does a distinctive reaction when it comes into contact with chloride ions in solution, you should be familiar with this. Of the two compounds, look at the structure and try and work out which is more likely to release chloride ions when it comes into contact with water.
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    (Original post by Blocker)
    Imagine adding aqueous silver nitrate to the compounds in question. Silver nitrate does a distinctive reaction when it comes into contact with chloride ions in solution, you should be familiar with this. Of the two compounds, look at the structure and try and work out which is more likely to release chloride ions when it comes into contact with water.
    So, what's the exact answer to the question?
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    (Original post by ben10)
    u know in chemistry ure given a table of E values. electrode potential things..
    and the question gave u a series of chemical reactions
    and u had to use the E values and say which reaction would produce a higher concentration of a particular product..

    would i have to work out the emf??
    or just look at which reacttion has a more positive E value ??

    (Original post by Blocker)
    Righty, im with you.

    You've more or less answered your own question. The emf of the reaction is the same as the sum of those E values for the two half reactions in your system [E total = E reduction - E oxidation]. The more positive this overall potential is, the more favourable your reaction and the more product you'll get.
    I got this question today as well in one of my teachers power points.. Do we know the answer to it, I didn't quiet get it. But I get how the values of emf effect concentration
 
 
 
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