Getting a GOOD job in the computer/IT etc industry? Watch

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hattori
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Hello

I have this friend (yeah I really do mean a friend), and she finished a degree in computer science (Bsc).

After a lot of looking she got a job works in technical support answering phones. Not really what she had in mind after spending 4yrs at uni. She was looking for a job that was more a challenge. At uni she tending to lean towards units that had more to do with analysing systems than programming or networking.

Now the future seems pretty bleak for her, doesn't want to stay in that job and promotions are unlikely. So she is thinking of taking a few more courses to make sure she lands that job when it comes round.

I've suggested that she stays put and gains that experience (? not sure its great advice) and in the meanwhile looks at all the jobs that she wants and makes a list of the qualifications that they demand. Then she'll find which ones are worth taking and add some value to her CV.

I was wondering if anyone here can recommend us some computer qualifications which are/ or soon will be in big demand? (bearing in mind that she's looking for a job thats doesn't require great programming.)

thanks
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AT82
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Personaly once you have got the degree in computing I think experience matters more. She should stick with the job for a couple of years and maybe do a part time masters course. Then in two years time she can get a good job. I am doing a computing degree course too and I will be grad of any job when I graduate. She will get a good job eventualy it just takes time. Gone are the days when you can walk straight into a good job after graduation.
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Petrozzi
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What University did she go to?
What was her degree result?
Why did it take 4 years to get a 3 year degree?
Does she have more than 280 UCAS points?
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EI_123
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(Original post by hattori)
Hello

I have this friend (yeah I really do mean a friend), and she finished a degree in computer science (Bsc).

After a lot of looking she got a job works in technical support answering phones. Not really what she had in mind after spending 4yrs at uni. She was looking for a job that was more a challenge. At uni she tending to lean towards units that had more to do with analysing systems than programming or networking.

Now the future seems pretty bleak for her, doesn't want to stay in that job and promotions are unlikely. So she is thinking of taking a few more courses to make sure she lands that job when it comes round.

I've suggested that she stays put and gains that experience (? not sure its great advice) and in the meanwhile looks at all the jobs that she wants and makes a list of the qualifications that they demand. Then she'll find which ones are worth taking and add some value to her CV.

I was wondering if anyone here can recommend us some computer qualifications which are/ or soon will be in big demand? (bearing in mind that she's looking for a job thats doesn't require great programming.)

thanks
From my personal experience you don't even need a Degree to get a job if you really, really, really know how to do the work.
Experience, like developing your own software can satisfy employers.
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EI_123
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The industry standard for programming is C++, you can also learn Java wich is a very spread language.
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AT82
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(Original post by Eternal Idol)
The industry standard for programming is C++, you can also learn Java wich is a very spread language.
You would hope that any degree course worth the paper its written on would cover these programming modules. Having said that I've heared that Chester teach their students Liberty Basic! (oh dear).

Of course I am refering to computing degrees here! I would not expect C++ to be taught on a law degree.
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EI_123
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
You would hope that any degree course worth the paper its written on would cover these programming modules. Having said that I've heared that Chester teach their students Liberty Basic! (oh dear).

Of course I am refering to computing degrees here! I would not expect C++ to be taught on a law degree.
If she already know C++ and have a degree ... she can work anywhere.

I only have a High School diploma and now I'm a Senior C\C++ Programmer.
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AT82
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(Original post by Eternal Idol)
If she already know C++ and have a degree ... she can work anywhere.

I only have a High School diploma and now I'm a Senior C\C++ Programmer.
Its probably a lot more competivite in the UK though. Virtualy all UK jobs in the computing industry now require degrees in software engineering etc. By the time I graduate I will be able to Windows API C++ programming (have only done very basic windows programming in c++ so far) do you think I will be able to get a job easily then if I get a 2:1 or above?

My main expertise is web development though such as ASP and PHP.
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EI_123
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
Its probably a lot more competivite in the UK though. Virtualy all UK jobs in the computing industry now require degrees in software engineering etc. By the time I graduate I will be able to Windows API C++ programming (have only done very basic windows programming in c++ so far) do you think I will be able to get a job easily then if I get a 2:1 or above?

My main expertise is web development though such as ASP and PHP.
There a lot of great programmers (especially in game development) that just made High School and of course that if you have a Degree it would be ten times easier to find a job but if you really know the deal you can get a job too.

Man, even with ASP and PHP you can get a job but it will not be a programmer one it will be a webpage developer or something.
If you complete your degree and know pretty well how to program ofcourse you can get a good job.

My advice is to make applications, stupid ones at first but to make something. To start projects, to fail and to finally learn the real development process.

That's what I did, I learnt to program by myself and after almost 5 years (13-18) I really knew how to DO a program, not just program, the whole development process. And know I can write any application that you want in Assembly.
I've setup a page with a couple of examples of my job, sent a couple of mails to IT companies and two of that replied me. I signed with the one that I like the most.

It's not that hard if you really know who to program and have the corage to send a couple of mails and have a couple of interviews.
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Barny
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I was going to do a computer science degree, until in year 10 the place I did work experience was full of graduates earning 20k, and they said they were lucky to even get that job, the computer industry doesnt pay well, and its hardly a great job(sitting infront of a pc all the time)
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AT82
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(Original post by imasillynarb)
I was going to do a computer science degree, until in year 10 the place I did work experience was full of graduates earning 20k, and they said they were lucky to even get that job, the computer industry doesnt pay well, and its hardly a great job(sitting infront of a pc all the time)
The software industry pays very well I know people earning £40-£50k in it, what was the industry you were in? anyway £20k is not that bad, its what a basic teacher gets.
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EI_123
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(Original post by imasillynarb)
I was going to do a computer science degree, until in year 10 the place I did work experience was full of graduates earning 20k, and they said they were lucky to even get that job, the computer industry doesnt pay well, and its hardly a great job(sitting infront of a pc all the time)
There are a lot of different jobs in the IT industry. If you don't like to be sitting in front of a computer too much ofcourse this isn't the work for you.
We work until 19:00, at 19:00 I'm gone, I have partners that stay at work till 23:00....
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EI_123
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
The software industry pays very well I know people earning £40-£50k in it, what was the industry you were in? anyway £20k is not that bad, its what a basic teacher gets.
As you said, there are a lot of different jobs and wages in the IT industry.
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hattori
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what about mcse and the like?
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Alaric
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(Original post by hattori)
what about mcse and the like?
ick...

Cisco qualifications are probably among the most sought after, especially the trickier ones that depend on earlier ones.

Alaric.
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Rich
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
The software industry pays very well I know people earning £40-£50k in it, what was the industry you were in? anyway £20k is not that bad, its what a basic teacher gets.
It's IT sales that pays well (I mean at an executive level, not selling PCs in PCWorld). However, to get a good job in this area you need experience and a very good track record and that's about all that matters. Being technically-minded is also generally a hinderance rather than a help so I very much doubt it's what I'll be doing.
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Rich
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(Original post by Alaric)
ick...

Cisco qualifications are probably among the most sought after, especially the trickier ones that depend on earlier ones.

Alaric.
Yeah, I think the number of people who have the top Cisco qualification is only a few thousand and I think these are the only people authorised to make changes to the most critical routers, which literally hold the internet together.
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AT82
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(Original post by rahaydenuk)
It's IT sales that pays well (I mean at an executive level, not selling PCs in PCWorld). However, to get a good job in this area you need experience and a very good track record and that's about all that matters. Being technically-minded is also generally a hinderance rather than a help so I very much doubt it's what I'll be doing.
Yeah I could never do sales. I once turned up to an PC WORLD interview and basicaly told them straight that if an old women comes in asking for a word processor I will not take them to the Pentium III's I will take them to the Cyrix P300's. This was a few years back now.

Sales is one job I can't do as I'm too honest. I'm hoping to go either into networking or multimedia development. Teaching is also another option, I.T FE lectureres get at least £25,000, my course tutor at university is on £40k (according to the university salary grades) so it dosn't pay as bad as people make out.
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Rich
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
Yeah I could never do sales. I once turned up to an PC WORLD interview and basicaly told them straight that if an old women comes in asking for a word processor I will not take them to the Pentium III's I will take them to the Cyrix P300's. This was a few years back now.

Sales is one job I can't do as I'm too honest. I'm hoping to go either into networking or multimedia development. Teaching is also another option, I.T FE lectureres get at least £25,000, my course tutor at university is on £40k (according to the university salary grades) so it dosn't pay as bad as people make out.
OK, at the level of PC World, maybe dishonesty is rife, but if you want to get anywhere in corporate IT sales (i.e. multi-million dollar deals etc.), honesty and integrity is very important. Just remember what happened to WorldCom. Dishonest companies/employees can often prosper in the short term but it will usually catch up with you and there is nothing that says a good sales manager/directory has to be dishonest (again I'm not commenting about the type of IT sales at PC World, I mean at a corporate level).

My dad works in sales and he's very honest!
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EI_123
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Hi rahaydenuk,

what kind of job do you want to get?
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