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Getting a law degree should be just as competitive as getting a medical degree watch

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    Seriously, how many studying actually become lawyers?

    The increase in tutition fees got me thinking, shouldn't law be just as competitive has medicine? Here's why:

    Due to the large stretch in fees students will want a degree that almost guarantees them a good job, degrees like medicine and law can provide that for them. Both careers (to a certain extent) command wealth, respect and power, so why should law degrees be easy to obtain?

    A lot of ex-polys/low ranked universities/universities in general are handing out Law degrees and when competing against a Law graduate from Oxbridge for example, wouldn't that Law applicant from an ex-poly be greatly disadvantaged? Wouldn't competition for Law jobs raise the roof? Wouldn't the chances of getting a job in a chamber/law firm prove impossible?

    Medicine however is very hard to get into, but the career prospects are secure. You're pretty much guaranteed to become a doctor if you complete medical school.

    I think, like medicine there should be a limited amount of law schools and the grade requirements should be just as high as medicine.


    I don't know if I'm making sense but do you see where I'm coming from?

    I have no intention of studying law or medicine at university so I'm sorry if I'm coming across as an ignorant ****.
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    Medicine has a set number of places because of how expensive it is to train medics.
    Law isn't like that so more places can offer the course.
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    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    Medicine has a set number of places because of how expensive it is to train medics.
    Law isn't like that so more places can offer the course.
    But would that competition increase drastically. Would you suggest that going to a top/high ranked Law school is 'preferred'?
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    (Original post by Miss Understood)
    But would that competition increase drastically. Would you suggest that going to a top/high ranked Law school is 'preferred'?
    As with any other course it would be preferred that you attend a higher ranked university.
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    (Original post by Miss Understood)
    Seriously, how many studying actually become lawyers?

    The increase in tutition fees got me thinking, shouldn't law be just as competitive has medicine? Here's why:

    Due to the large stretch in fees students will want a degree that almost guarantees them a good job, degrees like medicine and law can provide that for them. Both careers (to a certain extent) command wealth, respect and power, so why should law degrees be easy to obtain?

    A lot of ex-polys/low ranked universities/universities in general are handing out Law degrees and when competing against a Law graduate from Oxbridge for example, wouldn't that Law applicant from an ex-poly be greatly disadvantaged? Wouldn't competition for Law jobs raise the roof? Wouldn't the chances of getting a job in a chamber/law firm prove impossible?

    Medicine however is very hard to get into, but the career prospects are secure. You're pretty much guaranteed to become a doctor if you complete medical school.

    I think, like medicine there should be a limited amount of law schools and the grade requirements should be just as high as medicine.


    I don't know if I'm making sense but do you see where I'm coming from?

    I have no intention of studying law or medicine at university so I'm sorry if I'm coming across as an ignorant ****.
    Part of the reason medicine is more competitive in relation to law with regard to the number of places is because the NHS regulate the number of places available, as they do not want individuals who have completed the degree to be without a job, I guess because a student studying medicine does in fact cost the government a fair whack as the course fees do not cover the actual cost to study. I couldn't speak for law but I would guess that there are more places for law because there is not a public funded body which regulates the places available, I may be wrong however and someone may chip in and say it is infact otherwise, up until then I can only speculate this is one of the reasons why.

    I do see where you are coming from though, but in argument to that if that were to become the case, should the government not regulate all course requirements and places offered so that there aren't masses of graduates without jobs?
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    Compare how much it costs to train a law student and a medical student. Tuition fees do NOT cover the cost of training a medical student, even with the increase to a maximum of £9000 it still isn't going to be enough in most cases. The cost of teaching a Law student is pretty much on the same level as a history or English student, so more places are available. If we have that places available, why shouldn't we let people take law? Not all law students go on to become rich lawyers, a lot go on to help charities, do pro-bono work or conversion courses. Medicine is a more one way street really.
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    Yes... defending a half-wit for a petty crime in court and keeping track of legal documents should definitely require the same selective processing as choosing those who will in the future be handling the lives of others.
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    I see where your coming from. Especially today when so many law graduates from "lower" ranked universities can't get a job. But to be as competitive as medicine is too far, maybe something in between.
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    Capitalism and market forces disagree with you.
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    (Original post by IlexBlue)
    Yes... defending a half-wit for a petty crime in court and keeping track of legal documents should definitely require the same selective processing as choosing those who will in the future be handling the lives of others.
    That is quite funny, but at the same time you could have innocent people going to jail for no reason. But then, I guess evidence and DNA is what matters most in convicting the correct perpetrator.
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    (Original post by Miss Understood)
    Due to the large stretch in fees students will want a degree that almost guarantees them a good job
    Perhaps, but they'll probably be dissapointed.

    A lot of ex-polys/low ranked universities/universities in general are handing out Law degrees and when competing against a Law graduate from Oxbridge for example, wouldn't that Law applicant from an ex-poly be greatly disadvantaged? Wouldn't competition for Law jobs raise the roof? Wouldn't the chances of getting a job in a chamber/law firm prove impossible?
    Really depends on whether the employer discriinates I suppose. If we are talking top chambers here then, yes, it will certainly be more difficult. But it's also unlikely that someone graduating from a former polytechnic will apply for the same position as an Oxbrdige graduate (given the very small number of Oxbridge graduates and differences in aspirations). But for those who do come from former polytechnics, for there are some fairly strong "ex-poly" law schools, then it's certainly not out of the realms of possibility that they can rival with an Oxbridge grad. It happens.

    There's a very large number and variety of law firms up and down the country. From small rural practices, to medium high street firms, to large regional and national firms in major cities right up to City and internatioanl firms.

    You also miss an important point, not everyone studying law wants to become a solicitor or barrister. A law degree gives more options than that.

    What makes you think that by cutting the number of people able to study law, you are going to have this effect? Will you also like to restrict the numbers of those able to study the Graduate Dipoloma in Law (for non-law graduates) - a route significant number of lawyers pursue?

    In short what you are proposing is illiberal and unworkable. You fail to realise that almost all people studying medicine become doctors whereas a signifiant number of law grduates never become lawyers and go into other professions (not not always because they can't, often because they do not want to)

    The reason why there are a limited number of medical schools is because of the cost required in subsidising and training a medical student. The government doesn't want more medical graduates than there are positions. This isn't relevant in law where the cost of subsidising a student is no different to any other degree. It's just another degree subject. People graduate from law and go into a wide range of professions. Even if we are just referring to getting onto the LPC or BVC then, depsite the number of law graduates, few struggle to get a place (providing they are able to fund it). The problem comes with finding a training contract.
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    I think law students are quite aware of how competitive it is to get a training contract or pupillage and know that these days you cannot assume a law degree automatically leads to a successful legal career. I think it would be a good idea to limit places at the LPC/BVC stage, as those courses are designed for practice and are not much use if you don't get a job.

    An LLB on the other hand is a decent humanities degree which will serve graduates well for other careers if they don't achieve or want a career in legal practice. Many law graduates will go into other areas where legal understanding is valuable e.g. public policy roles, compliance, academic careers in law. Law is just as good as History, English etc. for soft skills, analytical skills, clear written communication, research etc and would be fine for the majority of grad schemes, so I don't see a reason to single out law if other general humanties degrees are not limited.

    If law undergrad courses were cut, you would probably just end up with more people on the GDL anyway!
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    Medicine is competitive mainly because SO many people want to do it, not because there's an AAA requirement. If you increased the number of schools, it'd still be hell to get into.
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    I find the comparison with medicine and law a bit strange.

    A lot of people I know studying law don't want to be lawyers. Law as a degree can lead to any number of jobs, and if you're studying it at a bad uni, were the degree course to be removed, you'd probably just be studying another humanity subject at a similar uni. Nobody's prospects are harmed by having so many opportunities to study law, so if they're willing to pay, why not? There is a big difference between law (a normal 3 year degree course, after which you can get a normal job or go on to do a one-year course qualifying you as a solicitor or barrister) and medicine (which takes 7 years of study and training to qualify as an actual doctor). I really don't see how the two are that comparable, as probably almost anybody studying medicine wants to be a doctor and therefore places are set by need, whereas a bunch of people who study law can easily find either related or entirely unrelated jobs if they don't want to be or are not good enough to become a top professional within law. The time, money and effort medicine take far exceed law. Yes, some very good law students don't get the jobs they want at the end of the day, but they have not been comparatively disadvanted to any other graduate student by studying law rather than history/english etc and therefore should not expect higher rewards.
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    medicine is a vocational degree, generally. law is not necessarily - you do the vocational part once you graduate. there is a current debate as to whether this part of the road to qualification should be made more difficult to get a place, particularly on the Bar courses, where for the most part people are self-funded, and then are competing for a tiny number of pupilages, but that's another issue.

    I studied law, but didn't become a lawyer. however, i wouldn't be doing what i'm doing now (socio-legal research) if I hadn't done law in the first place...
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    (Original post by IlexBlue)
    Yes... defending a half-wit for a petty crime in court and keeping track of legal documents should definitely require the same selective processing as choosing those who will in the future be handling the lives of others.
    Because being falsely imprisoned for murder doesn't destroy a life.
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    But not as competitive as an Economics degree.
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    (Original post by IlexBlue)
    Yes... defending a half-wit for a petty crime in court and keeping track of legal documents should definitely require the same selective processing as choosing those who will in the future be handling the lives of others.
    That's just a stupid comment. Not ALL lawyers deals with petty crime, just as ALL doctors do not deal with life threatening situations. Both lawyers and doctors are vital in maintaining a healthy society. You cannot class one as better merely because SOME doctors appear more important than SOME lawyers.
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    Many law graduates go to work for Federal agencies as well e.g MI5, FBI etc....
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    I believe that gaining a law degree is just as competitive as a medical degree. Getting onto the course, is by no means easy. Superior knowledge should be required.
 
 
 
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