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I think I might have dyspraxia. What should I do? Watch

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    I've had handwriting problems all my life. By handwriting problems, I mean really really bad problems. I don't have an example with me but I can't help but make my writing stray from a straight line. It just simply goes off the line and I can NEVER make the words the same size. Even when I focus, I just misjudge the size. If I try writing my words in a straight line, I often just stray from it even when I'm focusing. My hands also ache a lot after I write more than a page. I've been told over and over that the handwriting I use in exams, examiners definitely won't be able to read it as my teachers weren't even able to read most of it after spending so long trying to figure it out.

    My letters are also never uniform. They're always odd and sometimes rotated weirdly, sometimes all just messy and sometimes barely made out to be a letter.

    I also can't draw to save my life. It's always been terrible, my drawings are literally something that looks like a primary schooler drew. I can also never draw something in correct measurement. If I draw an eye, the other eye will just be so deformed compared to the first eye, even when I'm trying my hardest to copy it.

    I've also been terrible at ball sports. I've always been looked down upon as I never have any sense of depth or perception and can never catch a ball, control a ball or kick. I've always been on the sidelines in sports as no one ever really wanted me. I can't catch to save my life. If someone just simply threw a pen at me from 5 metres away lightly, I struggle a lot to catch it.

    I have no sense of balance and I'm always falling. I've been categorised by all my friends and everyone who knows me as 'dopey', 'clumsy', 'klutz'. I can't walk in a straight line as my pace is always swaying or just moving clumsily. My friends always complain that when I walk side by side with them, I don't walk straight and sort of push them to the side with every step. I fall a lot, and I mean A LOT. I've also knocked over and caused lots of accidents with this. People look down on me a lot due to these factors.

    I have no talent with things such as drawing--as stated before--but also cooking, textiles, graphics and all the other subjects similar to these. When I did food technology, I remember I couldn't even cut the things into slices correctly, it'd all be oddly shaped. I could never place the right ingredients or make a right shape of food.

    I'm just really useless at a lot of things throughout my life, like sports, a simple task of riding a bike and all that. I never really put much thought into it before now. I just thought I was that clumsy guy with all his talent not in things such as art and those but more in academic subjects. But I think it's more than that. I didn't really think much until my teacher mentioned to me that I could have dyspraxia. This was a while back, actually. I never really took it into consideration as I never thought I'd have something like that but now that I look at the symptoms, a lot of the things fit me to a dot.

    What should I do? Who do I consult about this? I'm starting to think I might actually have this but I'm not too sure. I can play badminton fine, my one sport that I can actually play, somehow. But I can't play anything else.
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    If you're at college, ask your Advice & Guidance people if you can sort out an assessment through the faculty. If not, go to your GP.

    If you're at university, there should be a disability support department kicking around somewhere. I suggest asking one of your tutors - it's how I got my assessment.

    Either way, they should let you take your exams on laptop after your assessment.

    Also, don't sweat not being able to do certain things. I'm dyspraxic, and I know what it's like growing up as the kid who gets picked last for every sport going because I can't throw, can't catch, can't even make a decent goalpost because I fall over if I stand still for too long.

    But you know what? Screw it. My internal tremor's so bad that I'm a human vibrator, and my girlfriend wouldn't have it any other way .
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    Sounds like me (apart from the falling over thing). (I don't have dyspraxia)
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    (Original post by Watcher7)
    If you're at college, ask your Advice & Guidance people if you can sort out an assessment through the faculty. If not, go to your GP.

    If you're at university, there should be a disability support department kicking around somewhere. I suggest asking one of your tutors - it's how I got my assessment.

    Either way, they should let you take your exams on laptop after your assessment.

    Also, don't sweat not being able to do certain things. I'm dyspraxic, and I know what it's like growing up as the kid who gets picked last for every sport going because I can't throw, can't catch, can't even make a decent goalpost because I fall over if I stand still for too long.

    But you know what? Screw it. My internal tremor's so bad that I'm a human vibrator, and my girlfriend wouldn't have it any other way .
    LOL at the last line XD

    I'm actually in secondary school atm. But couldja go more in-depth to your symptoms? I've mentioned some of these thoughts to people (not professional) and they've always said that it's not dyspraxia and it's just something a lot of people act like. So I don't honestly know what to believe.
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    (Original post by Watcher7)
    If you're at college, ask your Advice & Guidance people if you can sort out an assessment through the faculty. If not, go to your GP.

    If you're at university, there should be a disability support department kicking around somewhere. I suggest asking one of your tutors - it's how I got my assessment.

    Either way, they should let you take your exams on laptop after your assessment.

    Also, don't sweat not being able to do certain things. I'm dyspraxic, and I know what it's like growing up as the kid who gets picked last for every sport going because I can't throw, can't catch, can't even make a decent goalpost because I fall over if I stand still for too long.

    But you know what? Screw it. My internal tremor's so bad that I'm a human vibrator, and my girlfriend wouldn't have it any other way .
    Reading through you post, I NEVER expected it to end like that! You have my respect good sir.
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    *Bows* Thank you. I aim to please.

    My symptoms are as follows:

    Complete lack of fine motor control. This means, among other things, that my handwriting is so bad that my folks used to be convinced that I'd end up being a doctor, I can't hold a pen like normal people, I can't tie my shoes like normal people, I can't do anything remotely fiddly, and I can often be found stood at my front door at any time of day swearing at my inability to insert a key into a lock. Only part of all that that really matters is that I get intense pain incredibly quickly when I'm made to hand-write anything for an extended period of time, hence the laptop in exams.

    Lack of balance. Already explained this one. When I was a kid my mum used to make me stand in spot. Eventually I go over. Went to an old-fashioned grammar school too, complete with church services. Standing up in the pews for hymns turned into a giant game of dominoes when I eventually lost my balance.

    Internal tremor. Hold your hand out flat. Does it shake? Do you occasionally stutter? Do alcoholic homeless people ever see your hands trembling and decide you're some kind of blood brother? Not all dyspraxic people have the tremor, but it's a sign.

    Coordination. Are you clumsy as hell? I already know the answer to that one. You're a clumsy moron, and you probably hate yourself for it. Luckily, you're one assessment away from being able to sue the next games teacher who insults you! But seriously, don't worry too much about the coordination thing. When all my friends in school were playing football, I was learning how to talk to girls.

    Memory. Do you constantly lose things? Do people ever accuse you of not listening because you lose track of what they're saying, while they're saying it? Do you have an awful perception of time? Dyspraxic people tend to have processing trouble with their short-term memories. I definitely do. I couldn't honestly tell you what this post says before this paragraph without scrolling up. Weird, huh?

    That's about all for now. If the people you've been talking to aren't professionals, don't listen to them. Go talk to your GP. You might have to get a second opinion, because sometimes GPs are arrogant ********s who don't believe in developmental disorders. Mine certainly was. But keep fighting till you get an appointment with a neuropsychologist. Then when you get to uni, they'll give you free stuff.

    And everyone likes free stuff, right?
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    I had something like dyspraxia but overcame it. It took a few years of physiotherapy though.

    Another thing was that I got really into art when I was young and would just draw and draw all weekend, for years. I think that helped a lot with my fine motor skills. You can overcome it OP but it does take sustained effort.

    I'd get a proper diagnosis - see a specialist.
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    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by Watcher7)
    *Bows* Thank you. I aim to please.

    My symptoms are as follows:

    Complete lack of fine motor control. This means, among other things, that my handwriting is so bad that my folks used to be convinced that I'd end up being a doctor, I can't hold a pen like normal people, I can't tie my shoes like normal people, I can't do anything remotely fiddly, and I can often be found stood at my front door at any time of day swearing at my inability to insert a key into a lock. Only part of all that that really matters is that I get intense pain incredibly quickly when I'm made to hand-write anything for an extended period of time, hence the laptop in exams.

    Lack of balance. Already explained this one. When I was a kid my mum used to make me stand in spot. Eventually I go over. Went to an old-fashioned grammar school too, complete with church services. Standing up in the pews for hymns turned into a giant game of dominoes when I eventually lost my balance.

    Internal tremor. Hold your hand out flat. Does it shake? Do you occasionally stutter? Do alcoholic homeless people ever see your hands trembling and decide you're some kind of blood brother? Not all dyspraxic people have the tremor, but it's a sign.

    Coordination. Are you clumsy as hell? I already know the answer to that one. You're a clumsy moron, and you probably hate yourself for it. Luckily, you're one assessment away from being able to sue the next games teacher who insults you! But seriously, don't worry too much about the coordination thing. When all my friends in school were playing football, I was learning how to talk to girls.

    Memory. Do you constantly lose things? Do people ever accuse you of not listening because you lose track of what they're saying, while they're saying it? Do you have an awful perception of time? Dyspraxic people tend to have processing trouble with their short-term memories. I definitely do. I couldn't honestly tell you what this post says before this paragraph without scrolling up. Weird, huh?

    That's about all for now. If the people you've been talking to aren't professionals, don't listen to them. Go talk to your GP. You might have to get a second opinion, because sometimes GPs are arrogant ********s who don't believe in developmental disorders. Mine certainly was. But keep fighting till you get an appointment with a neuropsychologist. Then when you get to uni, they'll give you free stuff.

    And everyone likes free stuff, right?
    it doesn't have to be a neuropsychologist and if you go through the gp it's more likely to be an educationalpsychologist. some teachers have done some course that allows them to submit your assessment to exam boards giving some help and to refer you. whichever route you go with you might get passed from pillar to post (with the gp at least it can depend on the area you live in). if you go to uni you've got it all to look forwards to again for your post 16 check
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    http://www.dore.co.uk/dyspraxia/quicktest.aspx

    Thats a link to a free symptom checker, I remember taking it and being amazed. I'd been told that I was dyspraxic but never really understood how much it effected me.
    I found that most of my 'weird' or 'annoying' habits were actually dyspraxic symptoms, so I definitely reccomend doing the test above to see if its the same for you
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    Would also like to add a disclaimer, the link I posted is not a definitive diagnosis, but merely a useful indicator. Only a trained professional can give you an accurate diagnosis
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    (Original post by Watcher7)
    *Bows* Thank you. I aim to please.

    My symptoms are as follows:

    Complete lack of fine motor control. This means, among other things, that my handwriting is so bad that my folks used to be convinced that I'd end up being a doctor, I can't hold a pen like normal people, I can't tie my shoes like normal people, I can't do anything remotely fiddly, and I can often be found stood at my front door at any time of day swearing at my inability to insert a key into a lock. Only part of all that that really matters is that I get intense pain incredibly quickly when I'm made to hand-write anything for an extended period of time, hence the laptop in exams.

    Lack of balance. Already explained this one. When I was a kid my mum used to make me stand in spot. Eventually I go over. Went to an old-fashioned grammar school too, complete with church services. Standing up in the pews for hymns turned into a giant game of dominoes when I eventually lost my balance.

    Internal tremor. Hold your hand out flat. Does it shake? Do you occasionally stutter? Do alcoholic homeless people ever see your hands trembling and decide you're some kind of blood brother? Not all dyspraxic people have the tremor, but it's a sign.

    Coordination. Are you clumsy as hell? I already know the answer to that one. You're a clumsy moron, and you probably hate yourself for it. Luckily, you're one assessment away from being able to sue the next games teacher who insults you! But seriously, don't worry too much about the coordination thing. When all my friends in school were playing football, I was learning how to talk to girls.

    Memory. Do you constantly lose things? Do people ever accuse you of not listening because you lose track of what they're saying, while they're saying it? Do you have an awful perception of time? Dyspraxic people tend to have processing trouble with their short-term memories. I definitely do. I couldn't honestly tell you what this post says before this paragraph without scrolling up. Weird, huh?

    That's about all for now. If the people you've been talking to aren't professionals, don't listen to them. Go talk to your GP. You might have to get a second opinion, because sometimes GPs are arrogant ********s who don't believe in developmental disorders. Mine certainly was. But keep fighting till you get an appointment with a neuropsychologist. Then when you get to uni, they'll give you free stuff.

    And everyone likes free stuff, right?
    Wow! I'm really similar, especially in terms of memory. :/

    I can't actually tie my shoelaces, I get my mum to do it for me. I can't tie knots and I can't tie balloons either. It was really awkward 'cause I was at a close family party and I saw people try to tie balloons but when I tried, I just couldn't.

    I definitely have that lack of balance. I've been wobbly and knocking things over since the day I could walk. I sway a lot when I stand simply to try and keep my balance. Sometimes, I'd just be standing and all of a sudden stumble. It got a lot of weird looks from people that I still get up to this moment. I can barely balance on two feet, let alone one foot which I utterly fail at.


    And yes, I definitely lack co-ordination. A lot of bad accidents because of that. But I'm surprisingly quite good at badminton!

    And oh yes, the tremor. I didn't know that had anything to do with dyspraxia so I neglected to mention it. But I've always had a tremor. I always thought everyone had a tremor in their hand though. If I hold my hand out, the fingers are twitching heavily. Then after one second of attempting to holding it still, my whole hand starts shaking aggressively. Well, aggressively might be too strong but it starts moving quite fast. If I try stop it, it goes back to the finger twitching. Then the big tremor kicks in again. It's weird.

    And memory, oh god yes. I've noticed I said 'and' a lot at the start of these paragraphs. It's because I keep having to go back up and reading the whole quote to see what the next point was and then I write about it. What I've noticed is I cannot at all learn/process any information during a non-interactive lecture. Meaning, unless the teacher involves class discussion or I'm not given my own pace, I can't process information. Basically, if a teacher is just speaking on and on, I won't take in ANYTHING he says. If I'm made to read out loud in class, none of the information goes through my head. It's as if it simply goes to my vocal chords and none of what I say I actually take in.

    Thanks a lot for your help, I'll PM you if I ever have to ask you anything else or to keep you updated!
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    (Original post by amiphist)
    http://www.dore.co.uk/dyspraxia/quicktest.aspx

    Thats a link to a free symptom checker, I remember taking it and being amazed. I'd been told that I was dyspraxic but never really understood how much it effected me.
    I found that most of my 'weird' or 'annoying' habits were actually dyspraxic symptoms, so I definitely reccomend doing the test above to see if its the same for you
    Thanks for that link! It gave me a better understanding of dyspraxia as a whole.

    This is what they told me.

    You show a HIGH probability
    of having balance and co-ordination problems.
    You show a HIGH probability
    of having fine motor skill problems.
    These are symptoms of a condition known as dyspraxia.

    So, do I explain the symptoms I have to my GP to get a proper diagnosis? Do they carry out tests?
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    In my experience, you explain to a GP and then they put you on a waiting list. Mine didn't test me, but it was four years ago so it may have changed since then.

    Also, Dore are great if you can afford them. If you can't, you should get by fine anyway.
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    (Original post by Watcher7)
    In my experience, you explain to a GP and then they put you on a waiting list. Mine didn't test me, but it was four years ago so it may have changed since then.

    Also, Dore are great if you can afford them. If you can't, you should get by fine anyway.
    Okay, thanks! I guess I'll have to be really persistent at my GPs to get a test done! Thanks for your help, I'm going to go to bed now! Bye!
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    My mum told me she thought I had it, I always assumed I was just a naturally clumsy and forgetful person. The test was interesting, seems I have the same high probability stuff going on as you, OP.

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks for that link! It gave me a better understanding of dyspraxia as a whole.

    This is what they told me.

    You show a HIGH probability
    of having balance and co-ordination problems.
    You show a HIGH probability
    of having fine motor skill problems.
    These are symptoms of a condition known as dyspraxia.

    So, do I explain the symptoms I have to my GP to get a proper diagnosis? Do they carry out tests?
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    It would appear that us human vibrators are growing in number. We should probably form an army of the night at this point.

    Y'know, one that doesn't stand too closely together. Or march anywhere.
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    (Original post by Watcher7)
    It would appear that us human vibrators are growing in number. We should probably form an army of the night at this point.

    Y'know, one that doesn't stand too closely together. Or march anywhere.
    That could be a complete disaster. Maybe just stand around reading typed out speeches?
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    That could be a complete disaster. Maybe just stand around reading typed out speeches?
    Maybe sit rather than stand.
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    Bump for day people opinions! Not that there's anything wrong with night people.
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    I don't think I have dyspraxia but I have such a terrible coordination and memory, especially memory and I'm known for my clumsiness. Even when I'm replying to people's comments I need to reply to it in sections and put it all together as opposed to reading and remembering a comment and reply to it as a whole because I always forget most of the content that was mentioned and I forget what points I'm about to make.
 
 
 
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