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Is it red to a blind person? watch

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    Is a red ball, red to a blind person? If he has been told that the ball is red.
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    But blind people can't see?
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    It's always red but it's only a ball to him, the colour is of no significance to him. /thread
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    I think you mean colourblind...
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    (Original post by Absinth)
    I think you mean colourblind...
    I mean totally blind.
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    I'm going to presume that you're asking this question in a figurative, philosophical way rather than literally...

    In which case yes literally the ball is red but of course if you've never seen a colour (red or otherwise) you can't appreciate what red means. I suppose it would be possible for even blind people to associate certain things with colours (even if they can't actually see them), but a ball isn't a good example as balls can come in any number of colours. If however you told a blind person a poppy is red whilst they can't see it, they will realise red is that colour associated with poppies, and if you then mentioned a red ball they would associate it as being the same colour as a poppy. Though ultimately it's all just association rather than actual diffrentiation between the colours.

    I suppose when I first read your question I was reminded of this poem:

    I asked the little boy who cannot see,
    “And what is color like?”
    “Why, green,” said he,
    “Is like the rustle when the wind blows through
    The forest; running water, that is blue;
    And red is like a trumpet sound; and pink
    Is like the smell of roses; and I think
    That purple must be like a thunderstorm;
    And yellow is like something soft and warm;
    And white is a pleasant stillness when you lie
    And dream.”

    - Anonymous
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    (Original post by Absinth)
    It wouldn't be red to them because they wouldn't even be able to perceive it. It wouldn't change the fact that the ball is red though.
    I'm talking about someone who was not born blind but rather became blind at the age of 30.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    I'm going to presume that you're asking this question in a figurative, philosophical way rather than literally...

    In which case yes literally the ball is red but of course if you've never seen a colour (red or otherwise) you can't appreciate what red means. I suppose it would be possible for even blind people to associate certain things with colours (even if they can't actually see them), but a ball isn't a good example as balls can come in any number of colours. If however you told a blind person a poppy is red whilst they can't see it, they will realise red is that colour associated with poppies, and if you then mentioned a red ball they would associate it as being the same colour as a poppy. Though ultimately it's all just association rather than actual diffrentiation between the colours.

    I suppose when I first read your question I was reminded of this poem:

    I asked the little boy who cannot see,
    “And what is color like?”
    “Why, green,” said he,
    “Is like the rustle when the wind blows through
    The forest; running water, that is blue;
    And red is like a trumpet sound; and pink
    Is like the smell of roses; and I think
    That purple must be like a thunderstorm;
    And yellow is like something soft and warm;
    And white is a pleasant stillness when you lie
    And dream.”

    - Anonymous
    You're right, I'm not talking about someone who was born blind. What makes it red to a blind person, and not yellow, or brown, or green?

    I'll go to bed now and read your reply tommorw. Goodnight all. Love you all.
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    (Original post by Munchies-YumYum)
    You're right, I'm not talking about someone who was born blind. What makes it red to a blind person, and not yellow, or brown, or green?
    ... Well they obviously won't be able to know what colour the ball is until someone tells them, it's not like they'd be able to 'feel' red. If they were not born blind and was educated to a level that is able to associate different colours with different things, then I'm sure they would be able to remember what red the colour red is and then associate that colour to the ball.

    Close your eyes. Just because you can't now see the colour red, you still know what it looks like.

    I may have rambled.... it's like 5:46 am. I think I have insomnia
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    You do realize that blind people can't see?
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    I would have thought that if it was someone who has turned blind through the course of their life, then they will already know what red 'looks' like, and thus will be able to attach the appropriate colour to whatever image they have in their head of the ball. Whereas someone who has never seen red may, as has been said above, simply associate the colour of the ball with the colour of something else that they know is the same colour, without actually having the colour 'red' imprinted in their mind. I'm not sure if that makes sense.
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    Yes. The ball still reflects red light back to the world. The properties of it do not change because of person looking it it can't see.
    So even though they can't actually see, they can still know that red light is light that has a wavelength of 630–740nm, and I am sure there is some experiment you can do to work out the wavelength of the light reflected off an object.
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    Objectively, yes, the ball is red. Subjectively, at least form the blind person's perspective, it isn't anything. To him "red" is simply a label he knows nothing about.
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    Red is whatever we perceive as red. If we are color blind and red is a shade of gray, then that shade is still red. Colors are subjective and created in our brain; there is no way of us knowing what anyone else can see (not currently anyway).

    Even so, if we could see what others see, we would still be viewing it with our eyes so it wouldn't be the same (unless we got neural implants or something).
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    I asked the little boy who cannot see,
    “And what is color like?”
    “Why, green,” said he,
    “Is like the rustle when the wind blows through
    The forest; running water, that is blue;
    And red is like a trumpet sound; and pink
    Is like the smell of roses; and I think
    That purple must be like a thunderstorm;
    And yellow is like something soft and warm;
    And white is a pleasant stillness when you lie
    And dream.”

    - Anonymous
    He posts a hell of a lot of threads in the H&R section on TSR... Never knew he was in to poetry, though.
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    (Original post by Young Spade)
    Red is whatever we perceive as red. If we are color blind and red is a shade of gray, then that shade is still red. Colors are subjective and created in our brain; there is no way of us knowing what anyone else can see (not currently anyway).

    Even so, if we could see what others see, we would still be viewing it with our eyes so it wouldn't be the same (unless we got neural implants or something).
    If colour is subjective, how many people in the world would perceive white as white and black as black? What do you perceive as white and black?
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    (Original post by JakePearson)
    Objectively, yes, the ball is red. Subjectively, at least form the blind person's perspective, it isn't anything. To him "red" is simply a label he knows nothing about.
    If you were to describe this ball to the blind person, would you mention the colour?
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    Why are you making so many weird threads now?

    You need some rest, mate.
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    (Original post by Munchies-YumYum)
    If colour is subjective, how many people in the world would perceive white as white and black as black? What do you perceive as white and black?
    There's no way of knowing that. For the most part I think that we all see similar things, but that's just an assumption; one that a lot of people are comfortable assuming.

    I see white as the brightest and most reflective, black being the darkest and most absorbing. Of course that's what they are, and people could see different shades, but white by scientific properties is what's shown when all colors are reflected so that leads me to assume it's the brightest for "all" of us.

    I wouldn't be surprised if there were some people out there where colors are almost inverted or drastically different than the "average" person though.
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    (Original post by Young Spade)
    There's no way of knowing that. For the most part I think that we all see similar things, but that's just an assumption; one that a lot of people are comfortable assuming.

    I see white as the brightest and most reflective, black being the darkest and most absorbing. Of course that's what they are, and people could see different shades, but white by scientific properties is what's shown when all colors are reflected so that leads me to assume it's the brightest for "all" of us.

    I wouldn't be surprised if there were some people out there where colors are almost inverted or drastically different than the "average" person though.
    Then how did you deduce that it's subjective?
 
 
 
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