Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

AQA ICT Info 3 Pre Release June 2011 watch

Announcements
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ,,,,)
    Dude, you're a life saver! Thanks man
    No worries will put up source b in a bit when i've done it. Do you have any idea for the 2 i couldn't answer?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Some info on effects of teleworking/hot desking on workers AND businesses
    The + means advantage, and - means disadvantage


    Effects of teleworking on workers

    - Lack of face time with work colleagues/isolation as won’t be working with co-workers so won’t be able to develop relationships that can help you network
    -Time management: there a lot of distractions at home, it can be difficult to get work done if you have children/pets. It may be hard to get motivated without a traditional schedule/a boss looking over your shoulder
    - less aware of changes in company, may become “out of sight/out of mind”
    - there is a lack of separation between work and home, may be more potential for excessive working hours
    + savings in commuting costs/and other costs such as going out for lunch, using vendors and buying formal office attire
    + environmental effects, reducing pollution
    + less time taken off from work, employee may be well enough to work from home

    Effects of teleworking on business
    - accessibility to employees, may not be able to contact them
    - may be reduced productivity, company can’t see their employees working, employees may be just watching TV
    - security may be threatened, e.g. a company database may become corrupt and files/damaged if employee logs onto the internet from home and doesn’t have virus protection
    + less hours lost due to commuting traffic
    + savings in energy, office space requirements, maintenance and housekeeping

    Effects of hot-desking on workers
    - ICT ergonomics, the constant changing of seat positions/height, monitor angle and layout of office desk may cause induced stress to worker, each worker has different needs (some may be taller and may need higher chairs)
    - Different workers leave coffee cups/stains at desks = poor working environment for other workers
    - Shared office spaces with shared computers, computer interface devices, and telephones can act as harbors for viruses and bacteria that cause illnesses like cold and flu

    Effects of hot-desking on business
    +The benefits of this are that the heating, lighting, use of machines (shared pc’s, printers, phones, etc.), can be reduced
    + The space in the office will be reduced. All of these result in reduced energy usage, costs and carbon footprint
    + Advantages to hot desking include reduced office costs, networking opportunities, and access to reserved private office space away from home. Because the average employee is at his desk less than a third of the time, companies can benefit from using hot desking in their workforce because it makes use of desks that are not occupied.
    - If a company moves to flexible working, then every team in the company must be trained and required to implement hotdesking properly, otherwise morale will suffer
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kaskade)
    No worries will put up source b in a bit when i've done it. Do you have any idea for the 2 i couldn't answer?
    Tbh i have no clue, i don't know what am doing *sigh*, thanks olivia for the teleworking post
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ,,,,)
    Tbh i have no clue, i don't know what am doing *sigh*, thanks olivia for the teleworking post
    It's ok
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi does anyone have any notes on the "business process modelling tools" and "data modelling tools" part of the specification? this part really confuses me!

    Thanks
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Niamhx)
    Hi does anyone have any notes on the "business process modelling tools" and "data modelling tools" part of the specification? this part really confuses me!

    Thanks
    These are my notes, but it's no where near as detailed as the book, sorry
    EDIT: the titles are bolded but i cba to format it on here sozzers!

    Decision tables
    • Provide simple way of displaying the actions to be taken when certain conditions occur.
    • There are the following sections:
    - Conditions stub: situations or events which need testing. Cause of the actions which need to be taken. A condition might be “is the person over 18?”
    - Actions stub: these are the actions depending on the combination general conditions in the conditions stub that apply. For instance: “may be served alcoholic drink” could be an action.
    - Conditions entries: these give an indication of which of the conditions apply. This is done by placing Y or N next to each condition depending on whether the condition applies or not.
    - Action entries. – These are the conditions which apply. A cross is marked in the decision table to show which actions should be taken.
    Advantages of decision tables:
    • You can make sure that all the combinations of conditions have been considered.
    • They are easy to understand since the information is held on one table.
    • There is a standard layout so everyone uses the same format.
    • Programmers may use them to write programs and they are useful for working out logic conditions in excel, database etc.
    • They show cause and effect and are therefore understood by most people.
    Data flow diagrams
    • They look at inputs, processes and the outputs of a system.
    • External source of data
    - Oval box which is used to describe where outside the system the data comes to. I.e. customer.
    • Data flow
    - Shown by an arrow pointing in the direction of the flow, usually it is advisable to put a description of the flow on top of the arrow to aid understanding.
    • Data store
    - Data store is anywhere where data can be stored such as a filing cabinet etc.
    - Symbol will have a number to give it reference when describing it.
    - M is used for manual C is used for computer.
    • Levels of DFD
    - You have to draw DFD’s at different levels:
    - Level 0 is an overview of the whole system. It is called a context diagram as it shows the main flows and orders.
    - Level 1shows the main processes in the system and presents a more detailed view of the data flows.
    - Breaks down the process boxes in level one and presents an even more detailed version of the processes.
    • Using DFD’s
    - During system investigation to record current system findings.
    - During system design to illustrate how a proposed system will work
    - When outlining the specifications of the new system.
    Entity relationship diagrams
    • Look at any components important to the system and the relationship between them
    • Entity – anything about which data is recorded. Includes people, places, objects, customers, sales, payments etc.
    • Attributes – Each entity has its own attributes. It is the detail about an entity, for example, customer name, postcode, amount owing etc. Etc.
    • Relationships – ways in which entities in a system are related to another. It could be a one to one relationship, one to many, many to many.
    • Deciding the type of relationship – looking at the relationship from both ends, a student could take more than one course. A single course can be taken by many students. Therefore it is many to many.
    • Another example might be – one tutor has many pupils, many pupils have one tutor – therefore it is one to many.
    • Many to many relationships cannot be implemented and so you have to create a new entity that would link the 2 together. For example, with many students to many course, a new entity called enrolment could be entered which attaches the 2 entities together.
    Using keys
    • Primary key – one or several attributes that can uniquely define a particular entity. For example, customer entity could be uniquely defined by a customer number.
    • Foreign key – when one of the attributes that is a primary key in one entity also appears in another entity, there is a relationship between the entities. Because the attribute is not unique, the key entered is called a foreign key. For example, if there was an employee ID as a primary key in the employee table, there might be an employee ID again in the payroll table. Therefore, the foreign key will take the place of the employee ID.
    Data dictionary: ADD IN AN EXAMPLE.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Entity relationship diagrams and information diagrams came up in jan 2011, do you think that it would appear this year as well :s, especially as this scenario has nothing to do with booking, order processes etc
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kaskade)
    These are my notes, but it's no where near as detailed as the book, sorry
    EDIT: the titles are bolded but i cba to format it on here sozzers!

    Decision tables
    • Provide simple way of displaying the actions to be taken when certain conditions occur.
    • There are the following sections:
    - Conditions stub: situations or events which need testing. Cause of the actions which need to be taken. A condition might be “is the person over 18?”
    - Actions stub: these are the actions depending on the combination general conditions in the conditions stub that apply. For instance: “may be served alcoholic drink” could be an action.
    - Conditions entries: these give an indication of which of the conditions apply. This is done by placing Y or N next to each condition depending on whether the condition applies or not.
    - Action entries. – These are the conditions which apply. A cross is marked in the decision table to show which actions should be taken.
    Advantages of decision tables:
    • You can make sure that all the combinations of conditions have been considered.
    • They are easy to understand since the information is held on one table.
    • There is a standard layout so everyone uses the same format.
    • Programmers may use them to write programs and they are useful for working out logic conditions in excel, database etc.
    • They show cause and effect and are therefore understood by most people.
    Data flow diagrams
    • They look at inputs, processes and the outputs of a system.
    • External source of data
    - Oval box which is used to describe where outside the system the data comes to. I.e. customer.
    • Data flow
    - Shown by an arrow pointing in the direction of the flow, usually it is advisable to put a description of the flow on top of the arrow to aid understanding.
    • Data store
    - Data store is anywhere where data can be stored such as a filing cabinet etc.
    - Symbol will have a number to give it reference when describing it.
    - M is used for manual C is used for computer.
    • Levels of DFD
    - You have to draw DFD’s at different levels:
    - Level 0 is an overview of the whole system. It is called a context diagram as it shows the main flows and orders.
    - Level 1shows the main processes in the system and presents a more detailed view of the data flows.
    - Breaks down the process boxes in level one and presents an even more detailed version of the processes.
    • Using DFD’s
    - During system investigation to record current system findings.
    - During system design to illustrate how a proposed system will work
    - When outlining the specifications of the new system.
    Entity relationship diagrams
    • Look at any components important to the system and the relationship between them
    • Entity – anything about which data is recorded. Includes people, places, objects, customers, sales, payments etc.
    • Attributes – Each entity has its own attributes. It is the detail about an entity, for example, customer name, postcode, amount owing etc. Etc.
    • Relationships – ways in which entities in a system are related to another. It could be a one to one relationship, one to many, many to many.
    • Deciding the type of relationship – looking at the relationship from both ends, a student could take more than one course. A single course can be taken by many students. Therefore it is many to many.
    • Another example might be – one tutor has many pupils, many pupils have one tutor – therefore it is one to many.
    • Many to many relationships cannot be implemented and so you have to create a new entity that would link the 2 together. For example, with many students to many course, a new entity called enrolment could be entered which attaches the 2 entities together.
    Using keys
    • Primary key – one or several attributes that can uniquely define a particular entity. For example, customer entity could be uniquely defined by a customer number.
    • Foreign key – when one of the attributes that is a primary key in one entity also appears in another entity, there is a relationship between the entities. Because the attribute is not unique, the key entered is called a foreign key. For example, if there was an employee ID as a primary key in the employee table, there might be an employee ID again in the payroll table. Therefore, the foreign key will take the place of the employee ID.
    Data dictionary: ADD IN AN EXAMPLE.
    Thankyou so much! not sure if it will come up but just to be on the safe side
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I dont think it will come up in section A but could perhaps come up in section B, i just wanted to understand it in case
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Okay - so i've answered the questions regarding the analysis for source B:

    • Benefits of becoming green to organisations costs
    Outlined in source A's evaluation
    • Changing procedures can benefit
    - Staff working at home - through intranets workers can access the system online. They can use mobile phones to call in if they need any help. This reduces travel costs as well as carbon emission and through video-conferencing and audio-conferencing, employees can hold meetings from home.
    - Hot desks - limits the amount of computers needed as there are no dedicated desks or offices/positions and so less energy is used and thus reducing their carbon footprint
    - Restricting staff to one PC - less power will be used
    - Reducing time of online availability - people are unable to waste electricity.
    - Purging storage - energy can be consumed by storage where high performance disks are used which require fast drives which use up a lot of energy. By purging storage, employees will have to delete uneeded/wanted data in order to satisfy the limit policy of the organisation and so reducing energy consumption.

    •What are social and technical issues of working at home.
    SOCIAL:
    - Lack of contact with other people. Some people prefer personal interaction with other employees as opposed to being isolated at home.
    - There may be distractions from domestic factors such as children, chores or the TV (lol)
    - If they are working at home after typical hours, they may not have personal or family time which is important to most people.
    - They may not feel part of the organisation as the are not interacting with the business and so they feel demotivated.
    TECHNICAL
    - As they are at home, they will not be able to contact staff on a one to one basis if they are confused with the system or intranet. They would have to call a help desk which doesn't always solve problems.
    - They therefore will need to be trained effectively on how to use the system alone which will cost money.
    They will have to rely on the speeds and reliability of their own internet and devices.
    - An intranet will always have to be online and staff will have to maintain it at the organisation so remote users can always get on with their job.

    (Original post by amushan1234)
    what are hot spots and cold spots again ?
    I noticed a few people were becoming confused as to what Hot and Cold spots are:

    Hot Spots: Servers and other computer devices consume a high amount of electricity which generates a lot of heat. When printers, servers and copiers are put together they produce a lot of energy heat and this is known as a HOT SPOT.

    Cold Spot: Therefore air conditioners have to work harder in the Summer to ensure the hot spots keep cool and thus do not overheat. This is known as a COLD SPOT.

    Solution: Locate heat generating equipment in different areas in an office so they do not cause a hot spot. Some web hosts promist to plan trees to offset emissions. Another solution would be to use solar power, so the use of energy is not renewable and NOT reliant on fossil fuels.
    I have a strong feeling they will ask a question on this...
    • Benefits of external suppliers.
    - You can ensure in the contract that suppliers have a policy regarding the environment that have internal policies ensuring the reduction of carbon emissions (these policies are writtien in my source A evaluation.)

    Thanks a lot everyone who uploaded their questions and analysis from lessons If anyone else needs help just ask!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Niamhx)
    I dont think it will come up in section A but could perhaps come up in section B, i just wanted to understand it in case

    (Original post by Niamhx)
    Thankyou so much! not sure if it will come up but just to be on the safe side
    No I don't think it will come up either... Would almost definitely come up in part B. I'm probably only going to learn DFD's and ER's as the tables aren't really used that often... Just know all the entity's
    (Original post by l0livia)
    Some info on effects of teleworking/hot desking on workers AND businesses
    The + means advantage, and - means disadvantage
    Thanks for those points, I will add them to my revision notes I just uploaded some as well a few points for teleworking but it looks like you nailed it
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    hey im getting quite worried about this exam becuase looking through a zig zag course companion and i cant remember any of it! wondered if anyone know what i would have to get to get a c overall i got a b or c in info 4 and a c overall in info1 and 2 last yr?
    thanks
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    These are two questions that I feel that are likely to come up in the exam so could you help me answer them please:
    1. How could future developments in ICT have an effect on the environment?
    Flexible screens - consumers less electricity

    2. How could the uses of tele-working and hot-desking improve the environment?
    - Employee don't have to travel to work which reduces carbon footprints
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Athers16)
    hey im getting quite worried about this exam becuase looking through a zig zag course companion and i cant remember any of it! wondered if anyone know what i would have to get to get a c overall i got a b or c in info 4 and a c overall in info1 and 2 last yr?
    thanks
    http://web.aqa.org.uk/UMS/index.php?id=04, just convert your raw marks to ums, you need your individual marks to determine what you need
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    i hate this subject, i don't even know why i took it. this is going to be my most difficult exam without a doubt
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    hy just letting u guys now that i found an awesome blog with info 3 help on all the topics and also possible question for green ict case

    http://a2icthelp.blogspot.com/
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thairshan)
    hy just letting u guys now that i found an awesome blog with info 3 help on all the topics and also possible question for green ict case

    http://a2icthelp.blogspot.com/
    do you know what maybe the last 20 marker pease any feelings on what might come up tell us i'm gonna fail sooooooo bad
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    probably introduction of large scale systms/hardware installation

    its never come up b4
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thairshan)
    hy just letting u guys now that i found an awesome blog with info 3 help on all the topics and also possible question for green ict case

    http://a2icthelp.blogspot.com/
    Thanks, much better than my book
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    no problem ill be updating it soon with questions on each topic so you can test yourself and see whether you know everything and btw should have mentioned its my blog i wanted to share my notes so people could have a better understanding of each topic.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: April 26, 2012
Poll
Do you like carrot cake?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.