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TSR's 2012 Tuition Fees Tracker - how much are universities charging in 2012? watch

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    (Original post by lozzyhickers)
    slightly off topic, but does anyone know what's going to happen with Postgrads?
    Despite what the Browne report said (everything remaining the same), I expect postgrad fees (esp for taught MA/MSc courses) will rise in line with their undergrad counterparts. It doesn't make sense for a uni to charge £9000 a year for an undergrad course and only £4000 for an MA.
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    (Original post by tigermoth99)
    Despite what the Browne report said (everything remaining the same), I expect postgrad fees (esp for taught MA/MSc courses) will rise in line with their undergrad counterparts. It doesn't make sense for a uni to charge £9000 a year for an undergrad course and only £4000 for an MA.
    No, that's what I thought too. It would be nice if they stayed, but I expect them to go up too, expecially in the cases of the Russel Group unis etc. Oh well...
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    (Original post by lozzyhickers)
    No, that's what I thought too. It would be nice if they stayed, but I expect them to go up too, expecially in the cases of the Russel Group unis etc. Oh well...
    As far as i'm aware, postgrads were never subsidised by the government in the first place, therefore there would be no excuse for unis to increase their fees.
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    (Original post by ultimate mashup)
    As far as i'm aware, postgrads were never subsidised by the government in the first place, therefore there would be no excuse for unis to increase their fees.
    No, they never were, we were just saying how it's obvious that the postgrad fees will go up, for this reason. But the question is how much.
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    (Original post by lozzyhickers)
    No, they never were, we were just saying how it's obvious that the postgrad fees will go up, for this reason. But the question is how much.
    Maybe your right, i'm not sure tbh. They never mention it on the media at all and if postgrad fees were to increase I'm sure it would be picked up on fast. The overall debt with undergrad and postgrad would be huge.

    Like i said B4, the undergrad fees are increasing because the majority of government funding is being abolished. Therefore universities have to increase the fees to make up for this loss. Postgrads were never subsidised so what excuse could a uni give for increasing them do you think?
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    (Original post by ultimate mashup)
    Maybe your right, i'm not sure tbh. They never mention it on the media at all and if postgrad fees were to increase I'm sure it would be picked up on fast. The overall debt with undergrad and postgrad would be huge.

    Like i said B4, the undergrad fees are increasing because the majority of government funding is being abolished. Therefore universities have to increase the fees to make up for this loss. Postgrads were never subsidised so what excuse could a uni give for increasing them do you think?
    Well in the past postgrads have always been more expensive than undergrads, that's not really an excuse but I imagine that's how they'll play it. They may also bring in the fact that postgrads often include research, so they'll charge more in order to employ better quality lecturers and research facilities maybe? We will have to wait and see!

    I'm gonna be in soooo mcuh debt
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    It's a really interesting question about postgraduate fees - who knows what will happen.

    If I were to argue against the postgrad fees rising, I'd ask whether the universities could actually recruit enough postgraduate students if they raised their fees. Unlike undergrad students there's no standard package of fee and living allowance support. Many postgrads fund themselves or get limited help from bursary and scholarship funds. Maybe universities would be shooting themselves in the foot and see a reduction in income if they raise their postgrad fees.

    Do you think raising fees would mean fewer postgrad students? Would it mean postgrad students being limited to just the rich and wealthy? Would it mean a decline in those postgraduate courses which have major academic merit but do not lead to financial and career gains for those doing them? Would this be a bad thing?
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    Seems like Huddersfield will be charging £7,950

    http://www.hud.ac.uk/undergraduate/f...nce/2012entry/
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    (Original post by jblackmoustache)
    Seems like Huddersfield will be charging £7,950

    http://www.hud.ac.uk/undergraduate/feesandfinance/2012entry/
    Thanks, added to the map.
    This is one of the lowest fee levels announced so far.
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    (Original post by RK)
    Thanks, added to the map.
    This is one of the lowest fee levels announced so far.
    Doesn't suprise me at all. They'd be shooting themselves in the foot. I'm at Hudds at the moment. The teaching is high standard, especially for education. Probably better value for money than shelling out loads more for Leeds met.
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    I've just added Bradford Uni to the map with £9000 fees.

    Harper Adams University College is also reported to be charging £9000 fees, but I've yet to find a text source for this on the unis own website....let me know if you find one.
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    http://www.harper-adams.ac.uk/press/....cfm?ID=201330
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    Thanks. Added to the link to the map.

    Keep letting me know as soon as more places announce their fees and we'll be able to keep the map up to date.

    Follow us on Twitter too, where we'll be tweeting about the latest additions: http://twitter.com/studentroom
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    Hi everyone,
    Is anyone on this discussion going to university in 2012 and will therefore have to pay the higher admission fees?
    I'm messaging from Channel Five News- tomorrow is the deadline for universities setting the news so we're looking for people who will be affected by it.
    My email address is [email protected] if you'd be able to help, thanks!
    Sally
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    (Original post by ultimate mashup)
    As far as i'm aware, postgrads were never subsidised by the government in the first place, therefore there would be no excuse for unis to increase their fees.
    Howevever, classroom teaching at all levels (band D teaching) is subsidised by the government (or, was, until November). From 2011 on, the 100 million budget for band D has been cut, so in order for universities to finance MA teaching (seminars/lectures, etc), additional funds will have to be sought. In my mind this will probably lead to an increase in course fees (some MA/MSc programmes have already begun to raise fees for 2011-2012 entry). Ultimately, it depends on the Higher Education Funding Council and the decisions they make this year, as well as the responses of individual departments to those decisions.
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    (Original post by RK)
    It's a really interesting question about postgraduate fees - who knows what will happen.

    If I were to argue against the postgrad fees rising, I'd ask whether the universities could actually recruit enough postgraduate students if they raised their fees. Unlike undergrad students there's no standard package of fee and living allowance support. Many postgrads fund themselves or get limited help from bursary and scholarship funds. Maybe universities would be shooting themselves in the foot and see a reduction in income if they raise their postgrad fees.

    Do you think raising fees would mean fewer postgrad students? Would it mean postgrad students being limited to just the rich and wealthy? Would it mean a decline in those postgraduate courses which have major academic merit but do not lead to financial and career gains for those doing them? Would this be a bad thing?
    I think that if postgrad fees are raised, less people will study them. I would love to do all the postgrads I am planning to do, but realistically, if the fees go up, I can't. Even though there are a few sholarships floating around, i'm really strugging to find funding for some sbujects. So yes, I think the majority will be rich students. I can imagine an increase in people taking science postgrads though, as there seems to be quite alot of funding for them compared to other postgrads, so maybe people will go for those instead?
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    Hey, Iwasn't sure where to post this exactly so if it's in the wrong forum can it please be moved

    The University of Huddersfield has announced that fees for undergraduate courses from 2012 will be £7950.

    http://www.hud.ac.uk/undergraduate/f...nce/2012entry/


    I think it's good that they're willing to charge a more 'affordable' price but I'm still somewhat concerned that it's slightly higher than the average the government predicted.

    Added to this, I wondered what people thought about the price in comparison to unis such as Leeds Met for example, who are planning to charge £8500 despite being lower in the league table.
    Surely something should be done to stop some unis taking the mic?
    http://www.leedsmet.ac.uk/study/feesandfinance.htm
    http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...ables/rankings

    * Just wanted to add that I'm studying at Huddersfield now, if that makes any difference
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    I am currently studying at huddersfield university and i don't think that the new tution fees are too high for this university, i don't think that the university is even worth the current fees. If it was starting out now, with the new fees i would not choose huddersfield at all, i would choose leeds.
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    (Original post by shoegirl12)
    I am currently studying at huddersfield university and i don't think that the new tution fees are too high for this university, i don't think that the university is even worth the current fees. If it was starting out now, with the new fees i would not choose huddersfield at all, i would choose leeds.
    Really? I quite like it there on the whole I was comparing it to Leeds Met rather than Leeds because they're both ex-polys. I think it's pretty bad that all the unis have gone towards the higher fees but I guess that was to be expected
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    (Original post by Baula)
    Really? I quite like it there on the whole I was comparing it to Leeds Met rather than Leeds because they're both ex-polys. I think it's pretty bad that all the unis have gone towards the higher fees but I guess that was to be expected
    What realistically were universities going to do though. Was not one of the reasons for considering fee rises because universities needed extra funding if they were to remain competitive on the world stage? Yet when the plan were announced they came with a massive cut in funding from the Government. This mean that on average unis would need to charge £7000 to maintain their existing funding levels. If they were to get any of the extra funding they needed then they were going to have to charge more. Yet the Government seemed to think an average pf £7500 was realistic. Looking at the situation, was an average of £7500 actually realistic? It would really only be possible if some institutions were actual able to take a cut in funding or a tiny increase - this was never a realistic option for any institution. So what we're seeing is really the only workable outcome from the plan the Government set out, unless the universities were going to suffer and see their standards fall. This doesn't mean the plans are good for students and indeed, in opinion they are not (putting too much of a mental deterrent on people form the poorest backgrounds and an actual financial deterrent from more middle class families) but because of the Governments decisions, this is the only thing which can happen without there being even worse problems. I'm maddening that the universities have been put in to such positions.
 
 
 
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