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    It'll be good for stopping med students wasting a place by selecting it as their backup.

    However, it does seem like an excessive step up in grades. I suppose it'll ensure the best students take the course, but AAB from a non top 50 uni is madness
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    In some ways it can be 'unfair' because one bad A-level exam can screw up your university choices entirely. Nevertheless, it must be recognised that little can be done about this.
    C'est la vie; that's what competition is about.

    Then again, it really depends, e.g. applying to Oxford Maths when you've attained AAAD - with a D in History, i.e. irrelevant; and your application can be made up by acing the MAT (relevant).

    So, not necessarily, but even so, that's life.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    It'll be good for stopping med students wasting a place by selecting it as their backup.

    However, it does seem like an excessive step up in grades. I suppose it'll ensure the best students take the course, but AAB from a non top 50 uni is madness
    It's called grade inflation, honey.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    C'est la vie; that's what competition is about.

    Then again, it really depends, e.g. applying to Oxford Maths when you've attained AAAD - with a D in History, i.e. irrelevant; and your application can be made up by acing the MAT (relevant).

    So, not necessarily, but even so, that's life.
    T'as tort, mon amie, c'est la guerre.

    The AAAD idea only applies in the application process. If you've only done 3 A-levels and mess one up, that's the end of it.

    And yes, you would say that as you obviously passed your A-levels with flying colours and got in. For someone who missed out on their place by a couple of UMS, it's unfair. But as I said, there's nothing the university can do about it.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    It'll be good for stopping med students wasting a place by selecting it as their backup.

    However, it does seem like an excessive step up in grades. I suppose it'll ensure the best students take the course, but AAB from a non top 50 uni is madness
    Med students are only allowed to apply to 4 uni's for medicine so they have a spare place anyway. What these Universities ask for and what they let people in with are usually very different. I've known people to get into university with one higher when the course asked for BBCC.
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    (Original post by anon2010)
    people on low income will begin to fear going to uni due to the debt that they know they will accumulate during their studies. They will feel it is out of their reach.

    Getting AAB in alevels doesnt mean your clever or that you will get a good degree. My course leader got BBBD at alevel but she still went on to get a 1st class degree, distinction at masters and a PhD. According to the new requirement she would not be "clever enough" to do the course when in fact she did that very course and did bloody well in it.

    I dont believe you have to be A grade clever to do well at uni.
    The purpose of A levels is to discern how much information you are able to absorb and also to gauge if you are worth having the time and effort put into, aswell as functioning as general qualifications. You should go to University only if you are clever, the cream of intelligence, because University is an educational institution for Academics and not people of 'average' intelligence who did not put the work in to get the grades.
    A levels are not necessarily a valid indicator of intelligence, but they certainly are indicators of how well you can absorb information and how hard you work, and it should be no different.

    Your teacher is an isolated example, that does not mean it applies to the majority of individuals, teaching a student requires time and effort, therefore they will only take the best they can get.
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    T'as tort, mon amie, c'est la guerre.

    The AAAD idea only applies in the application process. If you've only done 3 A-levels and mess one up, that's the end of it.

    And yes, you would say that as you obviously passed your A-levels with flying colours and got in. For someone who missed out on their place by a couple of UMS, it's unfair. But as I said, there's nothing the university can do about it.
    Well the applicant would just have to live with it.

    Miss the entry requirements - tough.
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    (Original post by Ocassus)
    The purpose of A levels is to discern how much information you are able to absorb and also to gauge if you are worth having the time and effort put into, aswell as functioning as general qualifications. You should go to University only if you are clever, the cream of intelligence, because University is an educational institution for Academics and not people of 'average' intelligence who did not put the work in to get the grades.
    A levels are not necessarily a valid indicator of intelligence, but they certainly are indicators of how well you can absorb information and how hard you work, and it should be no different.

    Your teacher is an isolated example, that does not mean it applies to the majority of individuals, teaching a student requires time and effort, therefore they will only take the best they can get.
    Universities have to tailor their degrees to the calibre of students they can attract. If a University gets no subsidies from the government and the student pays for their tuition, what difference does it make to you whether they are "clever" enough to go to university?
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    That sucks!!!
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    med students have every right to apply to biomed, medicine is too competitive and for some its the only offer they end up getting
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    It's about time that grades went up, A levels are too easy as it is. When you go to university you realise that the international students are pushed much harder than we are pre uni and hence have a greater work ethic and knowledge when they get there. Don't get me wrong there are international students who are at the same/lower level than some home students however the majority are pushed much further. University was always a place for the academically able and should return that way. Iv seen way to many of my friends doing so called university courses with material not even above A level
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    I don't understand the point of this thread? A university can set its entry requirements to be whatever it wants- clearly if these ex-polys are setting AAB requirements then they feel they can fill up all their places with >AAB students, so it makes sense for them to do so.



    A few examples of people you know don't mean anything. If you look at the statistics you'll see that higher A-level grades do correlate to better degree performance.

    Therefore,

    Good A-level grades does = More likely to get a good degree

    Which is why Universities use A-level entry requirements. If A-levels had no relation to university performance, these universities would save themselves the trouble and just select on a first-come first-serve basis or at random.
    Yup, although you can't argue with what he actually said. Good A-Level grades don't = clever nor = able to get a good degree. And can't argue with what you said either, certainly they do mean that you are statistically more likely to get a good degree.
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    To be fair, I think this is a good thing. It will increase the standard of students at ex-polys and weed out the ones who go there just for the sake of going to universities.

    Now all the ex-polys have to do is stop offering bull**** degrees and they wont be looked down upon so much!
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    (Original post by anon2010)
    1. there will be little point in med applicants having it as a back up any more.
    Applicants to medical school are only allowed to have a maximum of 4 Medicine courses on their application so they have to either have a back up or simply just not use their 5th slot. Most have a backup because a lot of people don't get any offers for Medicine at all... even if they do get top grades
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Well the applicant would just have to live with it.

    Miss the entry requirements - tough.
    I'd be interested to see if you said the same thing, put in that applicant's shoes.

    You might not have gotten your place at Oxford! :eek:
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    (Original post by arabcnesbit)
    Universities have to tailor their degrees to the calibre of students they can attract. If a University gets no subsidies from the government and the student pays for their tuition, what difference does it make to you whether they are "clever" enough to go to university?
    Because they are usurping a place from somebody else? If a university sets is standards to AAB, then it should theoretically only attract AAB students. If it sets it lower, any potential AAB students might be overlooked.
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    (Original post by Ocassus)
    Because they are usurping a place from somebody else? If a university sets is standards to AAB, then it should theoretically only attract AAB students. If it sets it lower, any potential AAB students might be overlooked.
    How would a student with higher grades get overlooked for a student with lower grades?
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    Ah these ex polys cant win can they. People whinge when their entry requirements are too low, now you're whinging they're too high :rolleyes: make your mind up!
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    I'd be interested to see if you said the same thing, put in that applicant's shoes.

    You might not have gotten your place at Oxford! :eek:
    What do you mean 'might not have gotten'? She hasn't gone to Oxford, she's doing her GCSEs.
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    tbh some poly courses are better than traditional universities which some to get by on their reputation alone without putting resources into the course.
 
 
 
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