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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    For someone who missed out on their place by a couple of UMS, it's unfair. But as I said, there's nothing the university can do about it.
    It's not unfair, there has to be a grade line somewhere otherwise there's no point in having grades...
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    (Original post by robinson999)
    entry requirement go up due to the amount of people applying, nothing to do with how good the place is
    Thus.

    EDIT: ...Or 'this', either works.
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    Thank heavens, degrees need to be more exclusive.
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    T'as tort, mon amie, c'est la guerre.

    The AAAD idea only applies in the application process. If you've only done 3 A-levels and mess one up, that's the end of it.

    And yes, you would say that as you obviously passed your A-levels with flying colours and got in. For someone who missed out on their place by a couple of UMS, it's unfair. But as I said, there's nothing the university can do about it.
    But if you're someone who's expecting to get AAB then how easy is it to mess up an entire a level? Particularly at A2, when half your grade is already determined by the AS grades you have - in some subjects you could get high Ds/low Cs and still get an A if you have high AS modules. And I mean last year I ****ed up an exam and got a C in that module, which was half the grade, and still got an A overall. I know some people do mess it up, particularly if they're doing stuff like Pre-Us where it all rides on the exams this year, but I know a lot of people who only missed their offers because they got complacent...should have just tried harder imo.
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    (Original post by Ocassus)
    The purpose of A levels is to discern how much information you are able to absorb and also to gauge if you are worth having the time and effort put into, aswell as functioning as general qualifications. You should go to University only if you are clever, the cream of intelligence, because University is an educational institution for Academics and not people of 'average' intelligence who did not put the work in to get the grades.
    A levels are not necessarily a valid indicator of intelligence, but they certainly are indicators of how well you can absorb information and how hard you work, and it should be no different.

    Your teacher is an isolated example, that does not mean it applies to the majority of individuals, teaching a student requires time and effort, therefore they will only take the best they can get.
    That seems like a rather old fashioned view on universities though. Universities now encompass (whether you like it or not) what universities and polytechnics used to do separately. So in other words if you are clever enough to go to a polytechnic then you are clever enough to go to uni now. If this isn't the case then there is a massive gap in the education system for all the average to not quite clever enough for university people. Do you expect everyone to either be doctors and lawyers, and if they can't do that just be a bricky or work in McD's?
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    I know that this annoying and a setback for people applying now, but to be honest, it is a good thing. First of all, it makes degrees more exclusive, and second, I would not have a problem being treated by a doctor who got AAB. If my doctor got DEE however, it might be a bit different. As for the whole "ex-poly" thing...who gives a s****?! Alot of them have been universities longer than many TSR user have been alive. Its time for these arrogant whining babies to grow up and recognise how the university is now, and its potential, rather than its unchangeable past.
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    (Original post by my9rides)
    I know that this annoying and a setback for people applying now, but to be honest, it is a good thing. First of all, it makes degrees more exclusive, and second, I would not have a problem being treated by a doctor who got AAB. If my doctor got DEE however, it might be a bit different. As for the whole "ex-poly" thing...who gives a s****?! Alot of them have been universities longer than many TSR user have been alive. Its time for these arrogant whining babies to grow up and recognise how the university is now, and its potential, rather than its unchangeable past.
    As long as they were a good doctor, why would you care?
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    They already know they're accumulating debt; if they can't research it, they definitely shouldn't be going to uni.

    You're not taking grade inflation into account, it's not like she got a modern-day D. Depending on how long ago she took her A-levels, it could be a modern B grade, and those B's would have been more like A's or maybe even A*'s.
    i got 3 As at A level. I didn't want to go to uni cos a. the price and b. it just wasn't my kind of environment. I know you don't have to pay it back all at once. But seeing my parents in debt, I don't want any hanging over my head at such a young age. And considering my subject, I highly doubt I'd ever make enough to pay it back anyway. OU was a good option for me.
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    (Original post by my9rides)
    I know that this annoying and a setback for people applying now, but to be honest, it is a good thing. First of all, it makes degrees more exclusive, and second, I would not have a problem being treated by a doctor who got AAB. If my doctor got DEE however, it might be a bit different. As for the whole "ex-poly" thing...who gives a s****?! Alot of them have been universities longer than many TSR user have been alive. Its time for these arrogant whining babies to grow up and recognise how the university is now, and its potential, rather than its unchangeable past.
    your be shocked what older doctor grades than

    why does it matter about A-level grades, A-levels mean nothing at degree level
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    (Original post by robinson999)
    your A-levels grades don't mean nothing to how you will do on your degree
    There's a strong correlation between A'level grades and university results.

    I should note that this is within universities. Also, "older doctors" average B's and C's, but old c's are a world apart from new D's.
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    (Original post by my9rides)
    I know that this annoying and a setback for people applying now, but to be honest, it is a good thing. First of all, it makes degrees more exclusive, and second, I would not have a problem being treated by a doctor who got AAB. If my doctor got DEE however, it might be a bit different. As for the whole "ex-poly" thing...who gives a s****?! Alot of them have been universities longer than many TSR user have been alive. Its time for these arrogant whining babies to grow up and recognise how the university is now, and its potential, rather than its unchangeable past.
    1. How do you know what your current GPs alevels were?
    2. If they passed med school then they are good enough to be a doctor.
    3. your telling me that if you were bleeding to death and there were 2 doctor one who had AAB at alevel and one who had DEE at alevel but only the one with DEE was able to help you would refuse and go for the useless doctor with AAB on principal? (not saying AAB doctors are useless just creating and example)
    4. what has being a doctor dot to do with it? this thread is about biomed.
    5. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Llamageddon)
    There's a strong correlation between A'level grades and university results.

    I should note that this is within universities. Also, "older doctors" average B's and C's, but old c's are a world apart from new D's.
    Yes but some grads can become doctors with no alevels as long as they have a degree. Med schools would not accept them if they didnt think they would pass the course.
    There are some grads medics on here who have CCC or CCD at alevel.
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    (Original post by Llamageddon)
    There's a strong correlation between A'level grades and university results.

    I should note that this is within universities. Also, "older doctors" average B's and C's, but old c's are a world apart from new D's.
    would it, people quote all these the older C would be todays A, these no source to go with that

    when the media have tried to put out that A-levels are easy by using people who know that field more than your average person still don't get an A

    these a strong correlation because of study habits, but A-levels and a degree are a whole new ball park, i know many who walked in with D's and walked out with a 1st or 2.1 and a place at med school
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    (Original post by robinson999)
    would it, people quote all these the older C would be todays A, these no source to go with that
    There's a bell-curve. You study a life science, you really should have a better grasp of how these things work.

    Couple of things to consider: Since 200(2?) we have moved from a single sitting to multiple sittings. Considering no other factors this would obviously make it easier to do well. There are other factors, though. Since I did my A'level maths (2005) an entire module has vanished from the syllabus. The year below me effectively had 5 modules of work whilst I had 6. That's the last 10 years.

    There is also the much greater availability (and quality) of resources to work with, top-down pressures that cause teachers to teach to the exam and so on. A talented student today is much more likely to get an A grade than a talented student 40 years ago. This doesn't even have to mean things have been dumbed down, just that the grade is less indicative of the students natural ability.
    when the media have tried to put out that A-levels are easy by using people who know that field more than your average person still don't get an A
    Were I to sit my first year exams today I'd fail them. Were I to resit my first year I'd do better than previously. Again, you're supposedly doing science. Consider the concept of a fair test.
    these a strong correlation because of study habits, but A-levels and a degree are a whole new ball park, i know many who walked in with D's and walked out with a 1st or 2.1 and a place at med school
    It's your ability to get the A grades that indicate your ability to get good university grades. You can say "I know people who have..." well I know people who have gotten better after taking a placebo. I'm talking about trends and you're talking about individual scenarios. Yes, there are people who pick their socks up and work, but statistically you're more likely to succeed if you have a history of success.
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    (Original post by anon2010)
    Yes but some grads can become doctors with no alevels as long as they have a degree. Med schools would not accept them if they didnt think they would pass the course.
    There are some grads medics on here who have CCC or CCD at alevel.
    And I'm sure they will be successful. You've made the same mistake though. To say something is more likely or even significantly more likely is not to say that it will definitely happen.
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    (Original post by anon2010)
    people on low income will begin to fear going to uni due to the debt that they know they will accumulate during their studies. They will feel it is out of their reach.
    I am so sick of this attitude. It's your debt, not your parents, so why should their income even come into it?! Your degree will be just as good as someone from a high income background when you leave university, you will have as much earning potential, and so there is no legitimate argument to support that statement.
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    (Original post by floralia)
    But if you're someone who's expecting to get AAB then how easy is it to mess up an entire a level? Particularly at A2, when half your grade is already determined by the AS grades you have - in some subjects you could get high Ds/low Cs and still get an A if you have high AS modules. And I mean last year I ****ed up an exam and got a C in that module, which was half the grade, and still got an A overall. I know some people do mess it up, particularly if they're doing stuff like Pre-Us where it all rides on the exams this year, but I know a lot of people who only missed their offers because they got complacent...should have just tried harder imo.
    That's assuming that everyone who does their A-levels is comfortably in the grade boundary. For someone who got AAA but got 81% in each of their AS modules, it's very easy to drop to AAB or lower, even by slightly messing up one exam.

    And yes, some people do get complacent... in which case, they deserve to not get in. Others, however, just miss out because of some tiny part of the exam/examiner's marking style that had huge consequences. From my experience of AS marking, the examiners do sometimes have strange ways of doing things and our school's AS results last year were completely turned around as a result. The very best students appeared to absolutely flunk their exams and the worst ones ended up with the best marks.

    ^^ That's probably another rant, though. Sorry!

    (Original post by broadwayrachael)
    I am so sick of this attitude. It's your debt, not your parents, so why should their income even come into it?! Your degree will be just as good as someone from a high income background when you leave university, you will have as much earning potential, and so there is no legitimate argument to support that statement.
    I think the raise in tuition fees will be off-putting for people to apply to certain universities, particularly ones in London where it's very expensive to live anyway. That said, I don't think the £9k fees will stop people from going to university entirely.

    (Original post by hoopyfrood199)
    It's not unfair, there has to be a grade line somewhere otherwise there's no point in having grades...
    Just because something's unfair, doesn't mean it has to be changed.

    If you'll care to read my previous posts, you'll find that I've accepted that "that's the way it has to be." I'm only saying that it's unfair, or maybe unjust would be a better word, for someone who is very clever and had an AAB offer from Nottingham, for example, messed up one exam, ending up with 79% in one module, getting ABB and then having to go to their insurance choice. Nevertheless, as you quite rightly said, there has to be a line drawn somewhere.
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    (Original post by broadwayrachael)
    I am so sick of this attitude. It's your debt, not your parents, so why should their income even come into it?! Your degree will be just as good as someone from a high income background when you leave university, you will have as much earning potential, and so there is no legitimate argument to support that statement.
    There maybe no rational argument against it but when you come form a lower income family and you know your parents will not give you any money towards anything, because they cant, it does make it more scary.
    Im not saying that it is not possible for people on low incomes to go to uni Im just saying that it makes it way more scary.
    I come from a low income background and I know that even though they could get a loan, a lot of my friends where too scared of having that debt when they have nothing to fall back on like parent.
    Leaning how to cope with money in the first year of your degree is hard. If one week you run out of money and your parent cant give you any it make everything hard.

    It is so much more stressful for those from low income to embark on uni even if the debt is not "real".
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    (Original post by Llamageddon)
    There's a bell-curve. You study a life science, you really should have a better grasp of how these things work.
    doing a life science we have be taught one major thing to question every paper we read
    Couple of things to consider: Since 200(2?) we have moved from a single sitting to multiple sittings. Considering no other factors this would obviously make it easier to do well. There are other factors, though. Since I did my A'level maths (2005) an entire module has vanished from the syllabus. The year below me effectively had 5 modules of work whilst I had 6. That's the last 10 years.
    that multiple sitting is somewhat annoying to those who work hard first time round, if only they did what uni do, cap resit marks at 40%

    all thats building to is its easier to hit the higher marks, as long as you get the support

    There is also the much greater availability (and quality) of resources to work with, top-down pressures that cause teachers to teach to the exam and so on. A talented student today is much more likely to get an A grade than a talented student 40 years ago. This doesn't even have to mean things have been dumbed down, just that the grade is less indicative of the students natural ability.
    Were I to sit my first year exams today I'd fail them. Were I to resit my first year I'd do better than previously. Again, you're supposedly doing science. Consider the concept of a fair test.
    It's your ability to get the A grades that indicate your ability to get good university grades. You can say "I know people who have..." well I know people who have gotten better after taking a placebo. I'm talking about trends and you're talking about individual scenarios. Yes, there are people who pick their socks up and work, but statistically you're more likely to succeed if you have a history of success.
    i do like how we test people with exams, smart students can fail exams but all year be hitting top marks with coursework, more likely to get an A not so much due to dumbing down, more to do with the teaching, you are taught how to sit the exam and well if its not on the exam its no good

    the concept of a fair test goes out the window

    all i am trying to say A-levels and degree are a whole different ball park
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    (Original post by anon2010)
    There maybe no rational argument against it but when you come form a lower income family and you know your parents will not give you any money towards anything, because they cant, it does make it more scary.
    Im not saying that it is not possible for people on low incomes to go to uni Im just saying that it makes it way more scary.
    I come from a low income background and I know that even though they could get a loan, a lot of my friends where too scared of having that debt when they have nothing to fall back on like parent.
    Leaning how to cope with money in the first year of your degree is hard. If one week you run out of money and your parent cant give you any it make everything hard.

    It is so much more stressful for those from low income to embark on uni even if the debt is not "real".
    But those who come from higher income families may well be in the same boat i.e. they too will get nothing from their parents. This doesn't seem to be taken into consideration though.
 
 
 
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