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    I thought this one would be a good one for you to ponder over!

    Last year, me and my boyfriend went to the Dominican Republic and stayed in a Riu hotel. After about 3/4 days I started to get really ill from the food. Their hygiene was basically non existant, and their food preparation, especially with meat was disgusting in the buffets.

    The year before that my mum caught a tropical bug in the canaries and lost over a stone in weight from being so ill, from food poisoning.

    I always thought going all-inclusive would be a safe bet because they would have their reputation to uphold and their contract with their tour operators but this doesn't seem apparent!

    So on mine and my boyfriends next holiday we are contemplating going self catering... and it would be fine for breakfast and lunch we would just stick to plain sandwiches and bottled water etc. But when we go to a restaurant, what is the best food to stick to, to try and avoid food poisoning as much as possible? Because meat you can't guarantee was kept properly/cooked well, and salads and stuff might be washed in their water... I really don't want to live off chips for 2 weeks again so help us out foodies!
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    So, you're essentially saying all foreign food makes you ill, so you're going to eat sandwiches and bottled water for your holiday?

    and that doesn't sound in the slightest bit insane to you? The sandwiches and bottled water you buy will be handled by the locals too, you have the same chance of being made ill from them as any other food prepared in that country.

    Half of the fun of going on holiday is eating the local cuisine! It won't make you ill, you've generalised from one bad experience. The chances of substandard hygiene overseas is the same as in the UK. So what if you get the squits, at least you'll have a tummy full of delicious buffet.
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    Meat isnt all bad in places like that, its cooked, so as long as its not cooked properly it should be ok, same with cooked vegetables, raw things can be bad, may be best just to avoid chicken and watermelons to avoid salmonella.

    I spent a month in morocco and the only time i got ill was an evening of throwing up, but all wed had was pasta and jarred sauces, and i was the only one ill so i assume it wasnt the food.

    odds are youll be fine, just stick to stuff you know theyll have to have had cooked for long at high temperatures, avoid grilled stuff maybe.
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    I suppose it depends where you're going, but if you're going to a relatively 'safe' place, touristy/well known etc, I've never had any problems when eating in restaurants (and we've always gone self catered). If anything it's usually 100x better than service in the UK. You had one bad experience, but I wouldn't let that stop you from enjoying foreign food while you're on holiday - it's one of the best bits! (well, that and the sun, the sea, the warmth etc etc :P) x
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    So, you're essentially saying all foreign food makes you ill, so you're going to eat sandwiches and bottled water for your holiday?

    and that doesn't sound in the slightest bit insane to you?
    This. It sounds like you've just had a couple of bad experiences, don't let that ruin future holidays by keeping you condemned to pack lunches. Just book somewhere decent, and stay away from places that look like obvious dives.

    However to answer your question, red meat is arguably the better choice to go for. Being undercooked isn't really an issue if the meat is of a decent quality/state given that it can be eaten quite bloody (I'm progressively eating my steak rarer and rarer, and can almost tolerate my parents' choice of verging on blue), ordering it medium-well upwards should eliminate any risk entirely. White meat, on the other hand, needs to be cooked through well to ensure safety so you may be unwilling to risk it. Boiled/roasted veg dishes to ensure any impurities in water they may have been washed in have been cooked out properly is also something to look for.
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    When travelling round China, we were told to avoid raw foods (like salads), cold cooked foods (like cold meats), and buffets. But obviously take things on a case-by-case basis - if it's a street vendor whose hands look grubby, avoid any food that's not pre-wrapped (crisps, bottles of drink), and if it's a posh restaurant then you'll probably be ok with the above foods that we were told to avoid.

    If you do get ill, don't take diareze or whatever for it, unless you need it short term for a coach journey or a flight or something. Just keep yourself hydrated, and the bug will flush itself through. Cholera is one of the worst "food poisoning" bugs - you get it from infected dirty water, and it can kill within hours. All it takes to treat it is sachets of sugars and salts, mixed into clean water, and the illness is self-limiting.
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    You can't live your life going on holiday too scared to eat the local food. Where's the fun in that? Just be sensible and only eat stuff that is cooked from fresh and is piping hot. It really shouldn't be an issue.
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    Ask around / in hotels / online for well known good restaurants and eateries with a good reputation. Avoiding the local cuisine is a real shame, there must be some hidden gems! Self catering's great but it can get a bit boring making your own food all the time, when you're on holiday and want to do other things!
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    If you don't abide food safety and hygiene in your Hospitality business or in a food industry, you might get bad reputation as you're not following "common sense" and standards in preparing, handling, cooking and selling foods.
 
 
 
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