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Depression at University? Watch

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    I have been speaking to a lot of people who have come back from university and asked them what made them come back, few have said they didn't like the course and the people etc, but quite a large number of people have said that they suffer from mild depression.. I was just curious how you can get into depression whilst you are at University and whether this is something I should worry about as I have applied to start in September. I would appreciate all of the advice and if you are one of the people which have suffered from mild depression please tell me your story so I can learn from it.
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    the change from being a central part of a family unit in a familiar place to a place where you're a stranger and no one knows you affects quite a lot of people. also shy people find it harder to make new friends and start afresh and this leads to lonliness.
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    Ah, then i'm presuming that just spirals down into a slow depression? I'm quite glad i'm overt and talkative so hopefully what you've just said means that i'll be alright! Fingers crossed!
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    I don't think it's a topic you can 'learn from' per se - i suppose it depends on the individual - in that the course, the city and the institution are major factors in contributing to whether someone has a good/bad/average time at university.

    Personally, i would say that university is a place where many people find themselves or find out the very essence of their character - and in order to do so they tend to try a variety of groups/societies/activities.

    My advice to yourself would be to choose a university you decide is compatible with who you are - whilst perhaps choosing one that gives you the opportunity to broaden you horizons/outlook on life. go into uni with an open mind and the experience (as most people would dub it) will come to you.
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    In my uni experience so far, there's been a lot of time spent alone in my room. I have friends, but I haven't clicked properly with them, and sometimes this leads to me feeling lonely. Also, poor diet is something that's really been affecting me at uni. I'm a terrible cook so keep resorting to ready meals and all the junk makes me put on weight, have bad skin and generally just feel down. I was getting pretty bad by the end of term, and spending quite a bit of time crying, sleeping at crazy times then being unable to get out of bed, lacking motivation etc... but after 2 weeks at home, it's mostly passed and I'm feeling much better and ready to move back to uni
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    Two of my best friends have developed depression whilst at uni and are on medication. It's sad. Hard to know exactly what the causes are but I think its along the lines of what allieee said. Also the "pull every night" myth seems to have made a rather sexually unsuccessful friend lose all self-esteem.
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    Funny enough, it seems to be mainly British people who have this problem, even though their families live so close by. I am from Germany, studied 2 years at a international boarding school in England, and then went to a university.

    During the first 2 years of being away from my family I didn't have any of these problems, neither the friends and people around me. It was probably the best time of my life so far. Then at university, all the international people (I didn't know anybody at the uni when I came) seem to be completely enjoying their lives. There is the odd exception, but they are all fine and keeping more or less up with their work. But very very often, British people I meet have all kinds of strange problems, even though their families could most likely be reached by a 2 hour train trip.
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    Yeah, for some reason I have 3 friends at Uni that have depression, I only recentley found out about 2 of them. Where as back home I didn't know anyone with it.

    I'd say it's not something to worry about. If you just remain your normal self, and keep in contact with anyone you normally do, like speaking to your family and old friends then you'll be fine. It normally takes a lot of things, or one big possibly traumatic thing to trigger off depression from what I know (it's a complicated issue that I'm not going to pretend to be an expert at).
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    are you sure these people aren't confusing homesickness with 'mild depression'?

    Everyone gets a bit lonely/homesick at the start of uni but it quickly passes.
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    (Original post by rachelkeira)
    In my uni experience so far, there's been a lot of time spent alone in my room. I have friends, but I haven't clicked properly with them, and sometimes this leads to me feeling lonely. Also, poor diet is something that's really been affecting me at uni. I'm a terrible cook so keep resorting to ready meals and all the junk makes me put on weight, have bad skin and generally just feel down. I was getting pretty bad by the end of term, and spending quite a bit of time crying, sleeping at crazy times then being unable to get out of bed, lacking motivation etc... but after 2 weeks at home, it's mostly passed and I'm feeling much better and ready to move back to uni
    This.

    I don't think it matters how talkative or assertive you are or how many friends you have, its a massive change which takes time to adjust to.
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    It's pretty obvious and hard to avoid - the majority of students become dependent on alcohol at university...
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    Citalopram and seroquel medication?
    • #1
    #1

    I became quite depressed during my year and a half at uni, and eventually I dropped out in January. This was due to a number of things, but mainly the following three...

    Firstly I didn't really enjoy my course or see myself having a career with it but I realised what I did want to do and had do a another 3 year course in order to be able to. So it kind of seemed like a waste of time and money doing one degree to have to go onto another! And I had no motivation for my course at all.

    Secondly, I was friends with the girls in my flat at the start of uni, and then they basically turned on me because I didn't really agree with them constantly being horrible to another girl and so befriended her, against their wishes or whatever. So I ended up being really badly bullied which led me to develop quite low self esteem that really messed with my head, even after I had moved out of the flat for second year.

    Thirdly, I really missed my boyfriend and after 3 years of long distance really couldn't deal with it anymore, mainly I think because I was so unhappy anyway.

    So in January I dropped out, moved to be near to my boyfriend and am starting again slowly, trying to get over the depression and to go back to being 'me' again. I'm getting there, slowly but surely, and am determined to do so without anti-depressants which my doctor wants me to take. Being depressed is a really horrible thing, and I feel so stupid sometimes for letting everything get to me so badly and not do anything sooner. But oh well, I'm getting there!!

    I really wouldn't worry about depression at uni. Just make sure you join some societies and make lots of friends, and make sure you're doing a course that you're really sure you want to do!
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    I would never go as far as to call it depression, but this year I have waking up at 9am seven days a week, I have lectures Monday-Thursday then a part time job Friday to Sunday. Campus is two and a half miles away and I cant afford a bus pass so I spend two hours a day just walking there, I'm essentially pulling 50 hour weeks - which on it's own is okay, but when you add the planning for a year abroad (20 page application forms, funding apps and visa checks), being on extracurricular societies (so have to attend meetings and events in the evenings), looking for a replacement roommate (interviewing people and showing them about the house) and 14,500 words worth of essays due in for mid-april, it's just way too much. I feel like I'm nearly at my limit.

    I was okay at first, but after 20 weeks of it I am so tired, I feel like I'm running a marathon sometimes!
    I was looking forward to the Easter holidays but when they came I had booked overtime and an internship so I couldn't go home and visit my family.

    Over the last four weeks I've just felt myself spiralling down, been arguing with housemates a lot and very irritable and isolated, crying myself to sleep a lot of the time, I will fall asleep at 6pm and still wake up the next morning feeling exhausted.

    Today was my first proper day off since the 6th of January and I slept for 16 hours solidly and just woke up naturally and laid in bed knowing I didn't have to get up for anything. It was beautiful.


    But I can see why university serves as a trigger for depression for many people - it's very stressful.
    I was really happy in my first year, it's just been in my second year because I've had too much on my plate!
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    I currently wish to drop out of university. I am in my first year and I really can't hack it anymore.

    My biggest problem is I do not know where to go, my personal tutor and welfare tutor have been useless and I don't know where else I can say I want to drop out. And on top of that I have already signed a contract for a house to live in next year.

    I cannot afford to live in that house next year without a student loan, and due to signing a contract I have agreed to live there.
    Can I get out of this contract? Like if I find someone to move in to that house?

    Any help is welcome. I go to University of Birmingham.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    I would never go as far as to call it depression, but this year I have waking up at 9am seven days a week, I have lectures Monday-Thursday then a part time job Friday to Sunday. Campus is two and a half miles away and I cant afford a bus pass so I spend two hours a day just walking there, I'm essentially pulling 50 hour weeks - which on it's own is okay, but when you add the planning for a year abroad (20 page application forms, funding apps and visa checks), being on extracurricular societies (so have to attend meetings and events in the evenings), looking for a replacement roommate (interviewing people and showing them about the house) and 14,500 words worth of essays due in for mid-april, it's just way too much. I feel like I'm nearly at my limit.

    I was okay at first, but after 20 weeks of it I am so tired, I feel like I'm running a marathon sometimes!
    I was looking forward to the Easter holidays but when they came I had booked overtime and an internship so I couldn't go home and visit my family.

    Over the last four weeks I've just felt myself spiralling down, been arguing with housemates a lot and very irritable and isolated, crying myself to sleep a lot of the time, I will fall asleep at 6pm and still wake up the next morning feeling exhausted.

    Today was my first proper day off since the 6th of January and I slept for 16 hours solidly and just woke up naturally and laid in bed knowing I didn't have to get up for anything. It was beautiful.


    But I can see why university serves as a trigger for depression for many people - it's very stressful.
    I was really happy in my first year, it's just been in my second year because I've had too much on my plate!
    I'd like to know where and how you got this part time job.
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    Ahh I hope this isn't the case!

    I already suffer from depression, and I'm hoping that uni will help cure it! (my home environment isn't exactly a peaceful, nice one) I'm looking forward to my independence etc, and a fresh start.

    But I am worried about how I'll cope! :/ I'm just hoping for the best...
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    (Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
    I'd like to know where and how you got this part time job.
    That's a bit of a bizarre question! It's a job at the Library. It was advertised on their website back in September, I sent my CV and application off to them by email. They didn't actually get back to me for an interview until November, but the wait was definitely 100% worth it! It's been the best job I've ever had!

    Since actually getting the job I've realised how lucky I was to get it though. Earlier this term, I was watching my boss go through 70 applications for one part-time position (and those 70 were just the ones that got past HR's initial checks!) including applications from phd students and graduates.

    Before I worked at Warwick I was working at the Sainsbury's up in Canley on Friday and Saturdays. God that sucked.

    Anyway hope this helped
    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by pipster93)
    Ahh I hope this isn't the case!

    I already suffer from depression, and I'm hoping that uni will help cure it! (my home environment isn't exactly a peaceful, nice one) I'm looking forward to my independence etc, and a fresh start.

    But I am worried about how I'll cope! :/ I'm just hoping for the best...
    Personally I found I got far fewer downers at uni than beforehand.
    To begin with at least.
    22 weeks later they're still less frequent than they used to be, but also usually less intense. Which is nice

    It helps that for the first time since ever I made friends who actually value my presence.

    If you make the effort to make friends then you ought to be fine.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    That's a bit of a bizarre question! It's a job at the Library. It was advertised on their website back in September, I sent my CV and application off to them by email. They didn't actually get back to me for an interview until November, but the wait was definitely 100% worth it! It's been the best job I've ever had!

    Since actually getting the job I've realised how lucky I was to get it though. Earlier this term, I was watching my boss go through 70 applications for one part-time position (and those 70 were just the ones that got past HR's initial checks!) including applications from phd students and graduates.

    Before I worked at Warwick I was working at the Sainsbury's up in Canley on Friday and Saturdays. God that sucked.

    Anyway hope this helped
    Hey, at least it's work. Some of us have nothing!
 
 
 
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