Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
    Hey, at least it's work. Some of us have nothing!
    Indeed and I'm very very grateful. I like to grumble that I am so busy, but the reality is that I've chosen to take all these things on board. I know all these things will benefit me, and even if I am totally shattered, I can at least say I've made the most of my time at Uni.

    So every time my alarm wakes me up in the morning, it's that knowledge that gets me out of bed. But in an ideal world... I'd at least get Sundays off!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Indeed and I'm very very grateful. I like to grumble that I am so busy, but the reality is that I've chosen to take all these things on board. I know all these things will benefit me, and even if I am totally shattered, I can at least say I've made the most of my time at Uni.

    So every time my alarm wakes me up in the morning, it's that knowledge that gets me out of bed. But in an ideal world... I'd at least get Sundays off!
    Yeah but I don't think life is going to get any less stressful any time soon after university. It just can't be good for your health at all. Like, when was the last time you had a sex drive, for example? In the past when I've been proper stressed, mine almost totally goes.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
    Yeah but I don't think life is going to get any less stressful any time soon after university. It just can't be good for your health at all. Like, when was the last time you had a sex drive, for example? In the past when I've been proper stressed, mine almost totally goes.
    Bit of an inappropriate question!!!

    I don't know many people who work 7 days a week after graduating, if I just had to pull a 40-hour working week I'd be totally fine. My problem is just the part about not being able to stop or have any time to myself.

    When I was on my gap year before uni, I worked 55 hours a week (6 days) but I didn't feel this stressed because I had that one day a week to sleep or relax. I think it makes a big difference.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rachelkeira)
    In my uni experience so far, there's been a lot of time spent alone in my room. I have friends, but I haven't clicked properly with them, and sometimes this leads to me feeling lonely. Also, poor diet is something that's really been affecting me at uni. I'm a terrible cook so keep resorting to ready meals and all the junk makes me put on weight, have bad skin and generally just feel down. I was getting pretty bad by the end of term, and spending quite a bit of time crying, sleeping at crazy times then being unable to get out of bed, lacking motivation etc... but after 2 weeks at home, it's mostly passed and I'm feeling much better and ready to move back to uni
    That's exactly the same as what happened to me except without the unhealthy eating. I was also completely on my last legs psychosomatically and financially in the last two weeks of term and now I've come home I'm very much happier. Everyone has got bouts of depression this year. A lot of the social activity seems a bit forced and it can be hard to mix with all the normal people there.


    (Original post by GAguy)
    Funny enough, it seems to be mainly British people who have this problem, even though their families live so close by. I am from Germany, studied 2 years at a international boarding school in England, and then went to a university.

    During the first 2 years of being away from my family I didn't have any of these problems, neither the friends and people around me. It was probably the best time of my life so far. Then at university, all the international people (I didn't know anybody at the uni when I came) seem to be completely enjoying their lives. There is the odd exception, but they are all fine and keeping more or less up with their work. But very very often, British people I meet have all kinds of strange problems, even though their families could most likely be reached by a 2 hour train trip.
    I know, it's because we're all utterly pathetic and we don't know how to enjoy anything without getting blind drunk.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by screenager2004)
    I would never go as far as to call it depression, but this year I have waking up at 9am seven days a week, I have lectures Monday-Thursday then a part time job Friday to Sunday. Campus is two and a half miles away and I cant afford a bus pass so I spend two hours a day just walking there, I'm essentially pulling 50 hour weeks - which on it's own is okay, but when you add the planning for a year abroad (20 page application forms, funding apps and visa checks), being on extracurricular societies (so have to attend meetings and events in the evenings), looking for a replacement roommate (interviewing people and showing them about the house) and 14,500 words worth of essays due in for mid-april, it's just way too much. I feel like I'm nearly at my limit.

    I was okay at first, but after 20 weeks of it I am so tired, I feel like I'm running a marathon sometimes!
    I was looking forward to the Easter holidays but when they came I had booked overtime and an internship so I couldn't go home and visit my family.

    Over the last four weeks I've just felt myself spiralling down, been arguing with housemates a lot and very irritable and isolated, crying myself to sleep a lot of the time, I will fall asleep at 6pm and still wake up the next morning feeling exhausted.

    Today was my first proper day off since the 6th of January and I slept for 16 hours solidly and just woke up naturally and laid in bed knowing I didn't have to get up for anything. It was beautiful.


    But I can see why university serves as a trigger for depression for many people - it's very stressful.
    I was really happy in my first year, it's just been in my second year because I've had too much on my plate!
    Hey, I don't want to worry you but this sounds like you're suffering from burnout... :/ I don't know you and I don't want to mess with your lifestyle but I'd advise you to do something about it before you slip into a clinical depression. Burnout is an issue to be taken seriously, especially at uni/work.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    I know two or three people who got depressed during their first year and had to drop out. From the people I've known personally, I think it was a combination of being away from home, separated from close family and friends for the first time, the amount of work, and not being sure about the course.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Bit of an inappropriate question!!!

    I don't know many people who work 7 days a week after graduating, if I just had to pull a 40-hour working week I'd be totally fine. My problem is just the part about not being able to stop or have any time to myself.

    When I was on my gap year before uni, I worked 55 hours a week (6 days) but I didn't feel this stressed because I had that one day a week to sleep or relax. I think it makes a big difference.
    fair enough.

    not really inappropriate. still waiting for an answer. :poke:
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MissLee)
    Hey, I don't want to worry you but this sounds like you're suffering from burnout... :/ I don't know you and I don't want to mess with your lifestyle but I'd advise you to do something about it before you slip into a clinical depression. Burnout is an issue to be taken seriously, especially at uni/work.
    I know but to be honest there isn't much I can do.

    I can't exactly not bother to hand in my essays, I can't quit my job (need the money to survive and stuff) the best thing to do is just get my head down and get on with it.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I think people use the word 'depressed' rather too freely. You can feel sad or lonely and not be depressed you know...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I see, I hope you'll manage somehow!


    (Original post by screenager2004)
    I know but to be honest there isn't much I can do.

    I can't exactly not bother to hand in my essays, I can't quit my job (need the money to survive and stuff) the best thing to do is just get my head down and get on with it.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I can't see how I'd become depressed at Uni. Compared to how my life is currently, it'll be fantastic. 60 hours a week, working as a waiter is not fun. Literally working from about 3pm til 1am, six days a week. It feels as if I go to work, wake up and then have to get ready for work again.
    • #3
    #3

    I had an acute episode of depression and anxiety the first time I tried to go to university away from home when I was 17. Ended up not eating or properly talking for almost three days. Then spent weeks afterwards at home bursting into tears for no reason a few times a day. Then decided to try a university closer to home so I wouldn't have to move out. But now back into a mild depression, feeling really low and struggling to sleep properly, which leads to being constantly exhausted and unable to concentrate. Can't go to a doctor as my mum reckons I'm just 'stressed'.
    • #4
    #4

    (Original post by GAguy)
    Funny enough, it seems to be mainly British people who have this problem, even though their families live so close by. I am from Germany, studied 2 years at a international boarding school in England, and then went to a university.

    During the first 2 years of being away from my family I didn't have any of these problems, neither the friends and people around me. It was probably the best time of my life so far. Then at university, all the international people (I didn't know anybody at the uni when I came) seem to be completely enjoying their lives. There is the odd exception, but they are all fine and keeping more or less up with their work. But very very often, British people I meet have all kinds of strange problems, even though their families could most likely be reached by a 2 hour train trip.
    I don't think you can say this in general - I am currently studying in Germany (I'm German) and have found/still find it really hard to get on with the new experience of being alone in a new place, not knowing anyone, not knowing if the course is right for you etc. Throughout my first 4 or 5 months I had to cry several times a week and started using my free time with watching TV rather than go out and do sth (and I'm living in one of the biggest cities in Germany, so there would be stuff to do outside, just I can't get myself to leave the house).
    Now (after half a year) I've kind of got used to it and dont mind being on my own so much any more.
    I have to say that at school I had lots of lovely friends who all moved away to different places so I cant see them very much any more. But I was never a loner or something at school.

    And I'd say I'm not the only one here, so it can't be a British thing only.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I don't think you can say this in general - I am currently studying in Germany (I'm German) and have found/still find it really hard to get on with the new experience of being alone in a new place, not knowing anyone, not knowing if the course is right for you etc. Throughout my first 4 or 5 months I had to cry several times a week and started using my free time with watching TV rather than go out and do sth (and I'm living in one of the biggest cities in Germany, so there would be stuff to do outside, just I can't get myself to leave the house).
    Now (after half a year) I've kind of got used to it and dont mind being on my own so much any more.
    I have to say that at school I had lots of lovely friends who all moved away to different places so I cant see them very much any more. But I was never a loner or something at school.

    And I'd say I'm not the only one here, so it can't be a British thing only.
    Point taken.

    What I really meant though was that it's mainly British because they are studying in their own country, not simply because they are British. And for you it's in a way the same. You are German and study in Germany. I don't have any thing to prove this, but it's just something I noticed happening.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by comi)
    I currently wish to drop out of university. I am in my first year and I really can't hack it anymore.

    My biggest problem is I do not know where to go, my personal tutor and welfare tutor have been useless and I don't know where else I can say I want to drop out. And on top of that I have already signed a contract for a house to live in next year.

    I cannot afford to live in that house next year without a student loan, and due to signing a contract I have agreed to live there.
    Can I get out of this contract? Like if I find someone to move in to that house?

    Any help is welcome. I go to University of Birmingham.
    Hiya im in exactly the same boat as you, instead of dropping out im transferring uni to be back at home, i had signed a contract for a house but after speaking to the landlord he has said taht ihave to find a replacement for the room otherwise im liable for it. You should go to the course leader and speak to them as they have a bit more power about people dropping out etc, just make sure if you do you sort out student finance so you dont receive it when your not supposed to etcetc
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: April 11, 2011
Poll
Do you like carrot cake?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.