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    (Original post by splitstriker)
    Okay, your logic is starting to throw me now...what are your opinions on the german system of being called physician or dentist, with the doctor title being solely reserved for phd's?

    If you are using the latin derivation of doctor, then you should also look at the definition for receiving an honorary doctor title being an education to an equivalent level as that of a doctorate. (e.g medicine and dentistry)
    Medical and dental degrees aren't doctorates. They are bachelor of medicine and surgery, and bachelor of dental surgery, respectively. So no, I wouldn't necessarily advocate calling newly qualified medical graduates doctor. To me, a doctor is someone that can help the sick, and I don't believe you should comfortably say you can help the sick until you have gained full registration with the GMC (i.e. after completing F1). I appreciate that that is awfully pedantic, but to me, being called a doctor means you have a social responsibility to help people who need medical attention, evident in the Hippocratic Oath.

    Since dentists and PhD graduates don't swear the Hippocratic Oath, I don't think they should call themselves doctor - it's misleading to the general public. I appreciate that is a controversial thing to say, but that is simply what I believe in.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    I just think it's a little misleading to the general public. Imagine if there was a cardiac arrest on a plane and someone shouted "Is there a doctor on board?" Admittedly it's not as bad as if a history PhD graduate were to respond, but most dentists aren't competent to perform advanced or even intermediate life support and so I think the title lends itself to dangerous situations.
    Yes, they aren't as qualified as a medical doctor is but they are the next best thing.

    They are surgeons though so should be called Mr.
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    (Original post by dentistry1)
    Yes, they aren't as qualified as a medical doctor is but they are the next best thing.

    They are surgeons though so should be called Mr.
    To me, the next best thing would be a nurse or a paramedic, followed by a dentist.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    To me, the next best thing would be a nurse or a paramedic, followed by a dentist.
    You are underestimating a dentists training then.

    Remember dentist's complete approx. the first 3 years of a medicine degree
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    Medical and dental degrees aren't doctorates. They are bachelor of medicine and surgery, and bachelor of dental surgery, respectively. So no, I wouldn't necessarily advocate calling newly qualified medical graduates doctor. To me, a doctor is someone that can help the sick, and I don't believe you should comfortably say you can help the sick until you have gained full registration with the GMC (i.e. after completing F1). I appreciate that that is awfully pedantic, but to me, being called a doctor means you have a social responsibility to help people who need medical attention, evident in the Hippocratic Oath.

    Since dentists and PhD graduates don't swear the Hippocratic Oath, I don't think they should call themselves doctor - it's misleading to the general public. I appreciate that is a controversial thing to say, but that is simply what I believe in.
    Okay you are starting to create a rift between the work of dentists and doctors. Would you not consider dentists to have a social responsibility to deal with dental problems, which are in themselves a medical condition?

    Two patients to the GP:

    no 1: I have toothache, GP: Okay, go see a dentist
    no 2: I have high B.P, GP: Okay, go see a cardiologist

    I wouldn't consider this an example to be used at the start of a discussion on this topic, but i'm using it as a retort to the quoted point, as well as the point you have about nurses and paramedics.
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    (Original post by dentistry1)
    You are underestimating a dentists training then.

    Remember dentist's complete approx. the first 3 years of a medicine degree
    I'm really not. Dental and medical degrees have similar curricula for the first 2 years, in that they cover a broad approach to anatomy, physiology, pharmacology and microbiology (plus other things). Basic life support is covered too. But from the 3rd year on, dentists begin specialising in dentistry, whereas medics specialise in medicine.

    As someone who is about to undertake a second degree in dentistry, I would say that you are overestimating a dentist's training with regard to their medical competency. Why am I being made to do another 4 years of study if I already have a medical degree then?
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    (Original post by splitstriker)
    Okay you are starting to create a rift between the work of dentists and doctors. Would you not consider dentists to have a social responsibility to deal with dental problems, which are in themselves a medical condition?

    Two patients to the GP:

    no 1: I have toothache, GP: Okay, go see a dentist
    no 2: I have high B.P, GP: Okay, go see a cardiologist

    I wouldn't consider this an example to be used at the start of a discussion on this topic, but i'm using it as a retort to the quoted point, as well as the point you have about nurses and paramedics.
    Don't get me wrong. I'm not trying to belittle or criticize the work that dentists do. After all I'm going to be doing a dental degree myself and I can't wait to be part of this great profession. But I don't think the dental profession should pretend to be something it's not.

    And in the above example, the GP would be able to refer the patient to a cardiologist directly, whereas he wouldn't be able to refer the patient to a dentist, that being left to the patient to sort out for themselves.
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    I don't, but then I wouldn't really call a doctor "Dr" either, I just talk to them without mentioning a title tbh.

    As to whether dentists should get the "Dr" title.... I'd personally say "no" I think, because they're dentists, not doctors.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    I'm really not. Dental and medical degrees have similar curricula for the first 2 years, in that they cover a broad approach to anatomy, physiology, pharmacology and microbiology (plus other things). Basic life support is covered too. But from the 3rd year on, dentists begin specialising in dentistry, whereas medics specialise in medicine.

    As someone who is about to undertake a second degree in dentistry, I would say that you are overestimating a dentist's training with regard to their medical competency. Why am I being made to do another 4 years of study if I already have a medical degree then?
    You have to do 4 years because dental students start do dentistry after 1st year generally ( some schools start practical work after as little as 3 months) on top of their general medical training. That is why dentists can go into 3rd year of a medicine course.
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    For many years I called my dentist "That horrible man".

    Because of him, I hate all dentists now.
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    I call mine nasty drilly man
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    (Original post by mikeyd85)
    For many years I called my dentist "That horrible man".

    Because of him, I hate all dentists now.
    Haha. That is true though he is "That horrible man" (Mr) not "That horrible doctor" (Dr).
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    I suppose so, but my family's a bit weird with dentists: the first one had been doing my mum's teeth since about 1974 so we just called him "John". The private one I moved on to after John was forced out by NHS squeezes lives 2 houses down the road from me, so I just call him Les.
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    mines mr... then his surname. always has been and always will be until he retires. then i guaruntee you i WILL cry.
    iv had him since i started going to a dentist. and my mums been going to him since she was 11. so we know retirement will be on the cards soon =[
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    (Original post by dentistry1)
    You have to do 4 years because dental students start do dentistry after 1st year generally ( some schools start practical work after as little as 3 months) on top of their general medical training. That is why dentists can go into 3rd year of a medicine course.
    What on earth are you talking about? Accelerated medical degrees are 4 years long.
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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=30442258

    This came up the other week and we kind of hijacked some poor soul's thread.
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    (Original post by dentistry1)
    You have to do 4 years because dental students start do dentistry after 1st year generally ( some schools start practical work after as little as 3 months) on top of their general medical training. That is why dentists can go into 3rd year of a medicine course.
    There are 3 year dental courses for medical graduates...there are also 4 year medical courses for dental graduates.

    Careful with the use of 'general medical training'...no dental school would use that term for fair reason because that's not what we get.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    What on earth are you talking about? Accelerated medical degrees are 4 years long.
    There are some 3 year ones. Well, the one at Leeds is 2 years 8 months to be precise, according to the dental graduate that gave a maxfax talk here and who'd just gone into 3rd year medicine.
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    (Original post by PandyAndy)
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=30442258

    This came up the other week and we kind of hijacked some poor soul's thread.
    Ha ha I remember this. Well at least it has a dedicated home now.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    What on earth are you talking about? Accelerated medical degrees are 4 years long.
    There are number of 3 year medical courses for dental graduates across the country.
 
 
 
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