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    I call my dentist by his first name.
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    No, they are dental surgeons. I wouldn't call a consultant surgeon in the UK Dr either - he would be very offended.

    Dentist = Mr/Mrs/Miss

    In the USA surgeons and dentists alike are addressed as doctor - they don't have the nomenclature of the UK regards surgery.

    (Original post by infernalcradle)
    he didn't slave through med school....or get a PHd....

    I call him "dentist".....although we are on a first name basis....so its coolio
    I don't like the way you infer that a dentistry degree is somehow below, and easier than a medical degree.
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    (Original post by splitstriker)
    There are 3 year dental courses for medical graduates...there are also 4 year medical courses for dental graduates.

    Careful with the use of 'general medical training'...no dental school would use that term for fair reason because that's not what we get.
    I know, just trying to make a point.
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    Oh boy... how would you react if I told you in Jordan we call a pharmacist Dr.
    Don't ask me why.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    What on earth are you talking about? Accelerated medical degrees are 4 years long.
    Ring up Barts.
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    (Original post by No Future)
    Look, I wasn't referring only to this thread, but to various posts on various threads I have seen that make ignorant comments about dentists. There seems to be a general assumption that dentists are inferior to Drs.
    Yeah i've noticed an awful lot of this going around. Medics can only make those claims if they know f**k all about dentistry. I've had a lot of experience in both, and dentists are certainly not inferior to medics in any way.

    Anywho, in response to that whole "someone's dying on a plane, would you rather have a medic or dentist come help" i'd pick my bf who's going to be a dentist but is a fully- trained practising first- aider. And no offence, he'd be way better than the majority of medics at performing life- support as that's what he's specifically trained to do...
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    (Original post by dentistry1)
    Ring up Barts.
    Yes yes I am aware QMUL offer 3 year medical degrees. See my earlier post - your point being?
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    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    Yeah i've noticed an awful lot of this going around. Medics can only make those claims if they know f**k all about dentistry. I've had a lot of experience in both, and dentists are certainly not inferior to medics in any way.

    Anywho, in response to that whole "someone's dying on a plane, would you rather have a medic or dentist come help" i'd pick my bf who's going to be a dentist but is a fully- trained practising first- aider. And no offence, he'd be way better than the majority of medics at performing life- support as that's what he's specifically trained to do...
    That depends on what level of life support he can provide. Graduates of medicine and dentistry can provide basic life support (aka first aid). Newly qualified hospital doctors may take additional qualifications in intermediate life support or advanced life support, either voluntarily or as a compulsory requirement by their employer, whereas dentists probably wouldn't if they are thinking about becoming a GDP.
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    He insists on calling me Stace so I call him by his first name.

    He doesn't mind.
    Hi, Stace.
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    (Original post by PandyAndy)
    She was a Newcastle graduate who'd come to study medicine at Leeds. She'd done DF1 and 2, then gone straight to medical school. Quite a few dentists entered 3rd year medicine last year I'm told by my medic friends.

    And there's no way hell I'm touching that discussion again, not until I've done a few more pages of dissertation at least

    Damn you for editing while I was replying :mad2:
    Actually she did standard VT then got an SHO post. And sat MJDF somewhere along the way I imagine.

    This in no way contributes to the discussion but I felt the need to correct you anyways
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    I don't see a problem with them using "Dr." I guess it creates a more professional appearance and could make the patient feel in safer hands than if the dentist said "call me Larry"..same with patients though it's Mr/Mrs/Ms/Master/Miss somebody, not just their first name..It's more respectful and professional I guess
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    That depends on what level of life support he can provide. Graduates of medicine and dentistry can provide basic life support (aka first aid). Newly qualified hospital doctors may take additional qualifications in intermediate life support or advanced life support, either voluntarily or as a compulsory requirement by their employer, whereas dentists probably wouldn't if they are thinking about becoming a GDP.
    Probably got the wrong end of the stick here..but dentists do learn how to deal with choking, allergic reactions, epilepsy etc. And all know how to use a defiblirator and do some kind of first aid courses every so often to keep up to date (at least they did at my work ex place)
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    (Original post by Insomnia)
    Dentists hold the right to call themselves Dr .... Do you agree that they should use this title before their name?
    I think it depends on how they introduce themselves to you as, mine was by her first name
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    My dentist is called Steve. I call him Steve.
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    Paging Doctor ******...Doctor ******!


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    (Original post by electricjon)
    That depends on what level of life support he can provide. Graduates of medicine and dentistry can provide basic life support (aka first aid). Newly qualified hospital doctors may take additional qualifications in intermediate life support or advanced life support, either voluntarily or as a compulsory requirement by their employer, whereas dentists probably wouldn't if they are thinking about becoming a GDP.
    At the moment he's intermediate but I expect he'll go on to train as an ETA and become advanced as he enjoys his first aid volunteering. So he's much better than the standard qualified dentist, which is why I named him specifically.

    But in ever other case, i'd rather have a paramedic, or an A&E doctor
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    "mate"
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    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    At the moment he's intermediate but I expect he'll go on to train as an ETA and become advanced as he enjoys his first aid volunteering. So he's much better than the standard qualified dentist, which is why I named him specifically.

    But in ever other case, i'd rather have a paramedic, or an A&E doctor
    Or anaesthetist. They're pretty useful to have around
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    (Original post by tehforum)
    Hi, Stace.
    Hello. :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by woozeybear)
    Probably got the wrong end of the stick here..but dentists do learn how to deal with choking, allergic reactions, epilepsy etc. And all know how to use a defiblirator and do some kind of first aid courses every so often to keep up to date (at least they did at my work ex place)
    Well it sounds like they will have done ILS or ALS then, in which case, they are easily better and more competent than a medical graduate who hasn't. "First aid" however implies BLS, which is really nothing too impressive - most lay people have a basic grasp of 30 chest compressions to 2 rescue breaths.
 
 
 
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