Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    At the moment he's intermediate but I expect he'll go on to train as an ETA and become advanced as he enjoys his first aid volunteering. So he's much better than the standard qualified dentist, which is why I named him specifically.

    But in ever other case, i'd rather have a paramedic, or an A&E doctor
    Then good for him. I'd be more than happy to address him as Doctor.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electricjon)
    Well it sounds like they will have done ILS or ALS then, in which case, they are easily better and more competent than a medical graduate who hasn't. "First aid" however implies BLS, which is really nothing too impressive - most lay people have a basic grasp of 30 chest compressions to 2 rescue breaths.
    They got told that there is a really low rate of success when doing that method for over a certain amount of time.. Think they're supposed to do something else. But all dentists should know this in case of an emergency in the practice. They're working in the mouth, patient could choke if something went wrong, they're injecting stuff, patient could be allergic. They're patients are nervous which could cause an anxiety attack..epilepsy could occur etc. I wasn't saying they're better/less qualified than medics at all, just correcting you . I can't imagine an old school dentist saying "call me Steve" though, it'd be disrespectful in my eyes to call him by his first name too, and he should hold the same respect to me
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm not quite sure I follow you. BLS/ILS/ALS are internationally recognised. Low success rates when doing that method for over a certain amount of time? I'm confused.

    If a dentist has to get additional medical help because of an emergency that happens in his dental practice, and he/she is unable to deal with it themselves, then I don't think they should be allowed to call themselves Doctor. If they can, whether it be through possession of ILS/ALS or otherwise, then they can call themselves Doctor and I will have no objection to that.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electricjon)
    I'm not quite sure I follow you. BLS/ILS/ALS are internationally recognised. Low success rates when doing that method for over a certain amount of time? I'm confused.

    If a dentist has to get additional medical help because of an emergency that happens in his dental practice, and he/she is unable to deal with it themselves, then I don't think they should be allowed to call themselves Doctor. If they can, whether it be through possession of ILS/ALS or otherwise, then they can call themselves Doctor and I will have no objection to that.
    Fair enough we'll just have to agree to disagree I'd say Dentists and Doctors are in the same league, neither is better than the other. You'll get both tho And I can't remember the first part very well
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Calling a dentist 'doctor X' will only increase the gap between the patient and professional.. so patients will almost consider you higher up than them.

    ..Not a good way to build bonds!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electricjon)
    Then good for him. I'd be more than happy to address him as Doctor.
    Just because he can do advanced first aid? What about those of us with other qualifications?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I just call my dentist her name, Fiona.. I still see my school dentist though - despite being in my 2nd yr of Uni!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    What about those of us with other qualifications?
    Like what?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by No Future)
    Or anaesthetist. They're pretty useful to have around
    Definitely wouldn't want this one around...!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXzeRL7F-fY
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electricjon)
    Like what?
    Like phlebotomy etc. I'm an assistant practitioner myself (although I guess i'd give that up when i'm a qualified dentist)
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    Definitely wouldn't want this one around...!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXzeRL7F-fY
    Haha, but tbh it's usually the other way round

    Or this guy:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=notKtAgfwDA
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Would you call a phlebotomist a doctor?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electricjon)
    Would you call a phlebotomist a doctor?

    No but I wouldn't call first- aider's doctors either? Far from it, in fact.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm not saying I would either. But if a dentist had ILS or ALS I would be happy to call them a doctor.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    All the dentists at my place are called Mr.

    No doctors there :/
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I don't call my dentist Dr.

    But then agian, i don't call her anything. I mean i don't even know her name.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electricjon)
    That depends on what level of life support he can provide. Graduates of medicine and dentistry can provide basic life support (aka first aid). Newly qualified hospital doctors may take additional qualifications in intermediate life support or advanced life support, either voluntarily or as a compulsory requirement by their employer, whereas dentists probably wouldn't if they are thinking about becoming a GDP.
    I can provide emergency life-support, defibrillator and all that malarkey, so I'd be pretty decent at responding to an emergency on a plane. I've heard many doctors are, by their own admission, useless first aiders/ providers of emergency life support. A friend of mine is an ETA, and he was on a train the other week when a woman went into labour. The only qualified doctor that responded to the call for medical help walked away as "he hadn't seen a birth in years".

    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    Actually she did standard VT then got an SHO post. And sat MJDF somewhere along the way I imagine.

    This in no way contributes to the discussion but I felt the need to correct you anyways
    Ugh I got confused with all the talk of DF1 we had with her afterwards. Still, I give you brownie points for choosing me to save you on a plane
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electricjon)
    I'm not quite sure I follow you. BLS/ILS/ALS are internationally recognised. Low success rates when doing that method for over a certain amount of time? I'm confused.

    If a dentist has to get additional medical help because of an emergency that happens in his dental practice, and he/she is unable to deal with it themselves, then I don't think they should be allowed to call themselves Doctor. If they can, whether it be through possession of ILS/ALS or otherwise, then they can call themselves Doctor and I will have no objection to that.
    What about if a GP in their practice came across an emergency that they couldn't deal with? Would you not call them doctor? The fact that it's an emergency situation sort of goes hand-in-hand with "I can't deal with this, I need extra assistance".
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by electricjon)
    I'm not saying I would either. But if a dentist had ILS or ALS I would be happy to call them a doctor.
    Is life support the qualifying criteria to be called doctor now?


    Hmm, i'd much rather a dentist calls themselves doctor than some douche who wrote his PhD on how many times the word "tree" is mentioned in the Bible.

    (Original post by PandyAndy)
    Still, I give you brownie points for choosing me to save you on a plane
    Was that said on purpose?

    I'd choose you over a GP or neurosurgeon or something. I'd still take a paramedic over you if there was one there.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PandyAndy)
    What about if a GP in their practice came across an emergency that they couldn't deal with? Would you not call them doctor? The fact that it's an emergency situation sort of goes hand-in-hand with "I can't deal with this, I need extra assistance".
    I suppose you're right. I don't have much respect for GPs anyway, and they do share equal prescribing rights with GDPs. The BDA's obsession with the courtesy-title-Doctor issue is just as applicable to deskilled GPs, ophthalmologists or any other medical subspecialty, it's just that no-one seems interested in questioning medical graduates who are useless at helping in emergencies.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: September 7, 2011

University open days

  1. University of Cambridge
    Christ's College Undergraduate
    Wed, 26 Sep '18
  2. Norwich University of the Arts
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Fri, 28 Sep '18
  3. Edge Hill University
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Undergraduate
    Sat, 29 Sep '18
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.