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    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    Is life support the qualifying criteria to be called doctor now?


    Hmm, i'd much rather a dentist calls themselves doctor than some douche who wrote his PhD on how many times the word "tree" is mentioned in the Bible.



    Was that said on purpose?

    I'd choose you over a GP or neurosurgeon or something. I'd still take a paramedic over you if there was one there.
    Haha it wasn't funnily enough, but with hindsight you have too many brownie points already .

    I'd choose a paramedic over most people in an emergency medical situation. It was funny seeing those medical students in Gatecrasher last year after their friend got hit on the head with a bottle. Useless :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    Is life support the qualifying criteria to be called doctor now?
    In my mind, the ability to help any person in need of medical attention qualifies whether you can be defined as a doctor. Life support qualifications, to me, have more validity than the current criteria in the UK (i.e. having a medical degree, dental degree, or PhD).

    I suppose paramedics consistently provide the best overall standard of life support across their profession, so perhaps they should be called doctors, whilst dentists and medical graduates should be Mr/Miss/Mrs until they have appropriate life support qualifications, at which point they can call themselves doctors, until they decide to become surgeons, at which point they can go back to being Mr/Miss/Mrs.

    This thread has made me completely lose sight of my argument. I simply don't know anymore.
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    What it boils down to is:

    Dentists, vets, physicians- Honourary doctors
    PhDs- Actual technically doctors

    At least in America they don't have this trouble, as you have the MD and DDS when you qualify. Would a British dentist/physician be able to call themselved doctor in America, even though they only hold a Bachelor's degree?
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    (Original post by PandyAndy)
    Haha it wasn't funnily enough, but with hindsight you have too many brownie points already .

    I'd choose a paramedic over most people in an emergency medical situation. It was funny seeing those medical students in Gatecrasher last year after their friend got hit on the head with a bottle. Useless :rolleyes:
    Shaking someone with a head injury around isn't the best technique i've ever seen.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    In my mind, the ability to help any person in need of medical attention qualifies whether you can be defined as a doctor. Life support qualifications, to me, have more validity than the current criteria in the UK (i.e. having a medical degree, dental degree, or PhD).

    I suppose paramedics consistently provide the best overall standard of life support across their profession, so perhaps they should be called doctors, whilst dentists and medical graduates should be Mr/Miss/Mrs until they have appropriate life support qualifications, at which point they can call themselves doctors, until they decide to become surgeons, at which point they can go back to being Mr/Miss/Mrs.

    This thread has made me completely lose sight of my argument. I simply don't know anymore.
    I have to admit I have confused myself a fair bit too.

    In terms of academic qualifications and level of study, yes dentists should be able to call themselves "doctor".
    In terms of role and responsibility- no they shouldn't.

    I might do a PhD and earn myself the title now.
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    An honorary doctorate is a doctoral degree awarded for service to the institution or the wider community. This service does not need to be academic in nature.

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_(title)

    The title Mr. is actually higher than Dr. anyway..
    (Original post by electricjon)
    In my mind, the ability to help any person in need of medical attention qualifies whether you can be defined as a doctor. Life support qualifications, to me, have more validity than the current criteria in the UK (i.e. having a medical degree, dental degree, or PhD).

    I suppose paramedics consistently provide the best overall standard of life support across their profession, so perhaps they should be called doctors, whilst dentists and medical graduates should be Mr/Miss/Mrs until they have appropriate life support qualifications, at which point they can call themselves doctors, until they decide to become surgeons, at which point they can go back to being Mr/Miss/Mrs.

    This thread has made me completely lose sight of my argument. I simply don't know anymore.
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    Dentist are just medical doctors who have a greed for money and don't give a **** about their patience.
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    (Original post by SAK.A)
    Dentist are just medical doctors who have a greed for money and don't give a **** about their patience.
    Come back when you learn to spell.
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    (Original post by Ayshizzle)
    Come back when you learn to spell.
    I'm sorry for being human.
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    (Original post by SAK.A)
    Dentist are just medical doctors who have a greed for money and don't give a **** about their patience.
    Did you mean "patients"?

    And clearly you have no real knowledge about the Dental profession in comparison to the medical one. I don't really like the Dentist/Doctor debate but each degree lasts for the same amount of time, the same grades are required, same skills/personality traits are needed.
    Plus, whilst we're on the "greed for money" argument, doctors also have high salaries? So do a lot of other professions, completely unrelated to medicine, for example Barristers? So no, Dentists don't have any more or less of a "greed for money" than those in other, well-paid professions.
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    I don't really address him by any title. Going to the dentist is an awkward affair and I try to get through it with as little speech as possible.

    It's like getting your hair cut in that respect.
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    Dentist shouldnt be called doctor, as it is misleading
    yeah they have studied for five years and worked hard
    but personally, the use of the title "doctor" means alot more in medical scenarios....and i dont feel a dentist really needs to be called a doctor...( come on isn't the money enough?! lol)
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    (Original post by racheatworld)
    Did you mean "patients"?

    And clearly you have no real knowledge about the Dental profession in comparison to the medical one. I don't really like the Dentist/Doctor debate but each degree lasts for the same amount of time, the same grades are required, same skills/personality traits are needed.
    Plus, whilst we're on the "greed for money" argument, doctors also have high salaries? So do a lot of other professions, completely unrelated to medicine, for example Barristers? So no, Dentists don't have any more or less of a "greed for money" than those in other, well-paid professions.
    I might just be a bit sour towards the dental profession because of getting ripped off by one.
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    (Original post by SAK.A)
    I might just be a bit sour towards the dental profession because of getting ripped off by one.
    At least you're honest.
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    Only medical practitioner should be able to use the title Dr ?
    You go tell Dr Dre that....Man will f**k you up.

    Lol nah but seriously Dentist are Doctors ( Doctors of mouth, jaw, gums...and so on)
    According to wikipedia - A physician — which can encompass: MD, DO, MDCM, BMed, MBBS, BDS, BDent, DMD, DDS, DC, and BPod, DPM, medical practitioner, medical doctor, or simply doctor.

    And as to include "it's misleading to the general public..." I think the general public will be more worried as all around the world Dentist are known as Dr and if suddenly the use of Dr is stripped from Dentist, I'm sure the general public will be worried....leading them to believe there's something wrong and inferior about them. Also i'm pretty sure if you're intelligent enough to get into dentistry, you're not going to be the idiot to respond "Oh yeah i'm a doctor" to "Is there a Doctor in the house?" scanario then be like yeah....Dentist.

    And obv i'm not biased....:borat:
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    Absolutely agree. Whilst it is interesting to debate, I don't think the BDA should actually strip dentists of the privilege as that will shake up what is already a pretty fragile public view of UK dentistry.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    Absolutely agree. Whilst it is interesting to debate, I don't think the BDA should actually strip dentists of the privilege as that will shake up what is already a pretty fragile public view of UK dentistry.
    Aren't the BDA in support of it and supporting Dentist?
    I thought it was the GDC who decides these matters...?
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    Yes my mistake. BDA vs GDC Standards Committee.
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    (Original post by - Major -)
    Lol nah but seriously Dentist are Doctors ( Doctors of mouth, jaw, gums...and so on)
    According to wikipedia - A physician — which can encompass: MD, DO, MDCM, BMed, MBBS, BDS, BDent, DMD, DDS, DC, and BPod, DPM, medical practitioner, medical doctor, or simply doctor.
    I agree with this, in that a Dentist is a physician of one specialist area of medicine: the stomatognathic system (mouth, jaw & associated structures).

    A dermatologist only practices the specialist area of skin, yet they hold the title Dr. Why shouldn't a Dentist, who also specialises in a branch of medicine?


    And yes, striping Dentists of the title Dr would definitely be another black mark against Dentists in the view of the general public. Not to mention, it will make UK dentists appear to be less qualified than their overseas colleagues who hold the title of Dr yet the same qualifications.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    Since dentists and PhD graduates don't swear the Hippocratic Oath, I don't think they should call themselves doctor - it's misleading to the general public. I appreciate that is a controversial thing to say, but that is simply what I believe in.
    That's funny, cause I (a dentist) took the hippocratic oath before I graduated. With the medics, actually.

    I personally don't call myself Dr but any correspondance I receive from hospitals and other health professionals is addressed to Dr.

    Personally I've never had any patients come in and say, I've hurt my foot could you have a look at it or something. I think the general public are pretty alright with the concept that a dentist is not a medical doctor, to suggest otherwise is pretty insulting.

    To suggest a dentist would stand up and try to provide advanced life support in a 'is there a doctor here' scenario is just stupid. In the same way a doctor must realise and practice within their limitations, the same goes for dentists.

    The emergency situations we are taught to treat (with drugs) are things like anaphylaxis, epileptic fit, heart attack, angina --> things that could concievably happen in a dental practice. Statistically, one person will die in your dental chair in your working life.

    Honestly, if it bothers a doctor so much that a dentist can use the same title purely because they've studied as intensely as they have, get a life
 
 
 
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