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    (Original post by Magnanimity)
    Honestly, if it bothers a doctor so much that a dentist can use the same title purely because they've studied as intensely as they have, get a life
    Doctors aren't really bothered. It's the dental profession (i.e. the GDC) that has made this an issue.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    Doctors aren't really bothered. It's the dental profession (i.e. the GDC) that has made this an issue.
    I've seen this attitude throughout my degree though.

    The medics voted to not allow us to use their library. They would moan when we sat in on maxfax surgeries without understanding why we needed to know the anatomy. It's not just isolated to this. And it's mainly students, tbh. Although I've had GPs get snippy with me on the phone for suggesting that just maybe they might want to try miconazole and not fusidic acid for angular cheilitis?! It's not a professional attitude at all.

    But anyway.

    The GDC do not represent the dental profession at all. They represent the public. It's well known that dentists pay £600 a year to the GDC for them to work against us.
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    (Original post by Magnanimity)
    I've seen this attitude throughout my degree though.

    The medics voted to not allow us to use their library. They would moan when we sat in on maxfax surgeries without understanding why we needed to know the anatomy. It's not just isolated to this. And it's mainly students, tbh. Although I've had GPs get snippy with me on the phone for suggesting that just maybe they might want to try miconazole and not fusidic acid for angular cheilitis?! It's not a professional attitude at all.

    But anyway.

    The GDC do not represent the dental profession at all. They represent the public. It's well known that dentists pay £600 a year to the GDC for them to work against us.
    I won't deny that there is, and always will be, an element of resentment between doctors and dentists, but this is purely to do with the vast differences in pay associated with each profession, but that is a different issue altogether, and I don't think it would be fair to hijack yet another thread. The argument here is whether or not dentists should be afforded the courtesy title Doctor.

    And doctors also have to pay an extortionate sum to the GMC (£420 a year), for what feels like a needless service. Admittedly we do feel as though they work for us and are there to protect our rights, as opposed to trying to take them away. But so what? We're getting quite a way off topic now.
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    (Original post by gene-ius)
    I agree with this, in that a Dentist is a physician of one specialist area of medicine: the stomatognathic system (mouth, jaw & associated structures).

    A dermatologist only practices the specialist area of skin, yet they hold the title Dr. Why shouldn't a Dentist, who also specialises in a branch of medicine?

    A dermatologist went to medical school and has a medical degree.
    If a "doctor" were to specialise in oral health, they should complete a medical degree and then specialise after graduating, like a dermatologist does.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    I won't deny that there is, and always will be, an element of resentment between doctors and dentists, but this is purely to do with the vast differences in pay associated with each profession, but that is a different issue altogether, and I don't think it would be fair to hijack yet another thread. The argument here is whether or not dentists should be afforded the courtesy title Doctor.

    And doctors also have to pay an extortionate sum to the GMC (£420 a year), for what feels like a needless service. Admittedly we do feel as though they work for us and are there to protect our rights, as opposed to trying to take them away. But so what? We're getting quite a way off topic now.
    Well, for your reference, here is the GMC's response...

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/GMC_response_t...f_35755921.pdf

    So they believe that not even phd holders should be able to use the doctor title... So clearly doctors do have an issue with others using the title...

    How confusing is it going to be for patients that EU dentists who come to work here can use the doctor title but our own homegrown graduates can't? Won't that suggest the EU graduates are somehow more qualified? Won't patients wonder if Dr X next door is more qualified? The whole thing is ludicrous and typical of the over-regulation of the GDC.
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    Fascinating article. Thank you for posting.

    I don't think patients will ultimately care in the long run. However, if I was a patient who was shopping around for dental services and I saw Dr Smith and Mr Smith advertised, I MIGHT be inclined to think Dr Smith was more qualified, and that would therefore lead to an unfair advantage from a competitive, professional and clinical standpoint. Not saying I would think that, but I would bet that a large proportion of the British public do.
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    (Original post by xEndeavors)
    I always call my dentist Doctor. What else would I call him? :confused:
    I call mine Michael. Largely because that's his name.
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    I just call him Steve.


    It actually annoys him because his name isn't Steve.
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    Mine always call themselves Doctor, so I just call them the same.
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    medical surgeons are called "mr"/"miss"
    seeing as a dentist performs oral surgery they too should be called "mr"/"miss"
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    I just think it's a little misleading to the general public. Imagine if there was a cardiac arrest on a plane and someone shouted "Is there a doctor on board?" Admittedly it's not as bad as if a history PhD graduate were to respond, but most dentists aren't competent to perform advanced or even intermediate life support and so I think the title lends itself to dangerous situations.
    whaaat? are you actually that ignorant? do you REALLY think the General Dental Council would allow a dentist to practice if they can't even perform basic life support?! especially when local anaesthetics are being used that contain adrenaline etc and can easily enter the blood circulation?! Basic Life Support in fundamental in dentistry-it's one of the first things we learn!
    cummon think about it-we have hundreds of pts entering our surgery every week obv we need to be able to cope with an emergency because there's a HIGH likelihood of one occurring!!! we get trained to use defibrillators and everything. Bare daaaambbb!
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    (Original post by Insomnia)
    Too bad .. A medical student who has completed his 5 year course does!
    And? You have a Master's degree hence why it's an MBBS not DBBS (and the other variant titles). You're no more a doctor than I am, Mr. Insomnia.
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    (Original post by Einheri)
    And? You have a Master's degree hence why it's an MBBS not DBBS (and the other variant titles). You're no more a doctor than I am, Mr. Insomnia.
    bachelors degree actually

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelo...lor_of_Surgery

    i don't see why people get so hepped up about medics calling themselves doctor - pretty much all consultants have phds anyway, it identifies them to the public - and considering I know doctors of dance I don't see why we are any less deserving of it.
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    (Original post by azn-wonder91)
    whaaat? are you actually that ignorant? do you REALLY think the General Dental Council would allow a dentist to practice if they can't even perform basic life support?! especially when local anaesthetics are being used that contain adrenaline etc and can easily enter the blood circulation?! Basic Life Support in fundamental in dentistry-it's one of the first things we learn!
    cummon think about it-we have hundreds of pts entering our surgery every week obv we need to be able to cope with an emergency because there's a HIGH likelihood of one occurring!!! we get trained to use defibrillators and everything. Bare daaaambbb!
    Please quote me correctly. I am not disputing that you know basic life support. Of course you do. However, basic life support is simply giving 30 compressions to 2 breaths, not exactly rocket science and certainly no reason to call someone a doctor.

    As for defibrillators. Yes, I know that dental students, just like medical students, are taught how to combine BLS along with using an AED. An AED being an AUTOMATED External Defibrillator - i.e. you stick two pads on to their chest, turn it on, and then it does everything for you. Again, not THAT difficult and again, no reason to call someone a doctor - these things have clear instructions on the front to allow them to be used by any lay person. Nurses and paramedics are also trained to use them. No-one's calling them doctors either.

    What I am talking about is ADVANCED life support. Medical and dental students DO NOT study this at university, it being a 2 day internationally recognized course that anyone can do, you have to get renewed every 4 years, and teaches you how to do manual defibrillation, recognise and treat life threatening arrhythmias, post resuscitation care, as well as a range of common emergencies such as pregnancy, anaphylaxis, sticking needles in chests etc...and loads more - essentially all the important things that members of the general public might expect a "doctor" to be able to do in the is-there-a-doctor-on-board situation. That doesn't mean that "doctors" fresh out of medical school are automatically able to handle these things. Far from it, and part of their continuing postgraduate training involves attending such courses in order to develop. Without ALS, a junior doctor in the UK is very unlikely to get a competitive job or progress up their chosen career ladder, whatever their specialty, and as such represents one of the first of many hurdles that a newly qualified doctor must overcome. It's just that they're already called "doctor" by then so status doesn't really come into it.

    Dentists can progress in their career however, without having to possess ALS, and yet they would still be allowed to call themselves "doctor" straight after finishing dental school. I have an objection to that (in case you hadn't gathered by now!) MOST dentists, just like ALL newly qualified medics, would probably be hopeless in any serious emergency that required anything more than chest compressions, sticking on defibrillator pads and flicking a switch. To any dentists out there, would YOU know what to do if the defibrillator show torsades de pointes, irregular tachycardia with a broad QRS or pulseless electrical activity? Shock them? That would be a very bad idea. I suppose then you know what dose of adrenaline to give? Amiodarone? Magnesium? And over how long? Oh, you don't. Don't call yourself a doctor then. The public will be misled into thinking you can help in these emergency situations, which is what most people would expect.

    Bare daaaambbb?! wtf? Please. Just get it right before you lay into me.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    Please quote me correctly. I am not disputing that you know basic life support. Of course you do. However, basic life support is simply giving 30 compressions to 2 breaths, not exactly rocket science and certainly no reason to call someone a doctor.

    As for defibrillators. Yes, I know that dental students, just like medical students, are taught how to combine BLS along with using an AED. An AED being an AUTOMATED External Defibrillator - i.e. you stick two pads on to their chest, turn it on, and then it does everything for you. Again, not THAT difficult and again, no reason to call someone a doctor - these things have clear instructions on the front to allow them to be used by any lay person. Nurses and paramedics are also trained to use them. No-one's calling them doctors either.

    What I am talking about is ADVANCED life support. Medical and dental students DO NOT study this at university, it being a 2 day internationally recognized course that anyone can do, you have to get renewed every 4 years, and teaches you how to do manual defibrillation, recognise and treat life threatening arrhythmias, post resuscitation care, as well as a range of common emergencies such as pregnancy, anaphylaxis, sticking needles in chests etc...and loads more - essentially all the important things that members of the general public might expect a "doctor" to be able to do in the is-there-a-doctor-on-board situation. That doesn't mean that "doctors" fresh out of medical school are automatically able to handle these things. Far from it, and part of their continuing postgraduate training involves attending such courses in order to develop. As it is though, without ALS, a doctor in the UK is very unlikely to progress up the career ladder.

    Dentists can progress in their career however, without having to possess ALS, and yet they would still be allowed to call themselves "doctor." I have an objection to that (in case you hadn't gathered by now!)

    Bare daaaambbb?! wtf? Please. Just get it right before you lay into me.
    LOL ... We're still richer graduates than medics .. How does that feel?
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    (Original post by Insomnia)
    LOL ... We're still richer graduates than medics .. How does that feel?
    ffs, he wrote a well-researched post, why do you have to respond with that immature crap?
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    ffs, he wrote a well-researched post, why do you have to respond with that immature crap?
    That post isn't well researched .. it basically common sense to every medic and dental ... The guy has just too much pride in being a Doctor ... Its like get over life support whats the big deal? .. Part of his comments is contradicted also and requires further explanation which I really cba getting into .. bacl to studying addison's disease and cushings syndrome *
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    (Original post by Insomnia)
    LOL ... We're still richer graduates than medics .. How does that feel?
    I really hope I never come across you. I may have to punch you in the face.
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    (Original post by Einheri)
    And? You have a Master's degree hence why it's an MBBS not DBBS (and the other variant titles). You're no more a doctor than I am, Mr. Insomnia.
    Medics graduate with a bachelor's too, MBBS stands for Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery =)
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    (Original post by Insomnia)
    That post isn't well researched .. it basically common sense to every medic and dental ... The guy has just too much pride in being a Doctor ... Its like get over life support whats the big deal? .. Part of his comments is contradicted also and requires further explanation which I really cba getting into .. bacl to studying addison's disease and cushings syndrome *
    I won't deny I have pride in being a doctor. If you have an objection to that then I won't lose any sleep over it. I will however complain if people try to muscle in on the title purely because they're greedy, corrupt, power hungry, vain or want more people to buy their dental services.

    Okay okay I'm not saying that all dentists are like that (I imagine I'll still get negatively repped though for it), but my point still stands.

    And no, I don't really care about money. Though, since you point it out, I am going to be a MaxFax surgeon, so forgive me if I don't rise to any jibes that dentists make more money than doctors. Tell it to my butler.
 
 
 
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