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Which is the best Uni...? watch

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    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    That's kind of my point.

    If you were doing Maths and F. Maths then you would be in a good position. Why didnt you do Maths AS??


    edit: ROFL you didnt watch "Wall Street 2" and then decide to be a trader did you, because that would be unreally funny

    hahah no, I have been interested in the city especially trading for quite along time now, I have spoken to many people ect.. and have lined up some work experience at a tier 1 in the summer..
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    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    Oh please, the days of barrow-boys from the east end buying red braces and becoming traders are long, long gone.

    At this point, in order to get a graduate position, you need to demonstrate a huge amount of affinity for maths, be an obvious hard worker and be of considerably above average intelligence.

    There are people who can make it into the city as a second career, but that has its own set of challenges and would put you 3 - 4 years behind.

    I work in the city, what are you basing this nonsense on?
    The OP is looking for advice not anecdotes. My uncle is a stock broker and only gained a degree as a mature student. I dont see how this helps the OP? I was simply saying if you have enough drive there are other routes.
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    (Original post by CityTrader)
    hahah no, I have been interested in the city especially trading for quite along time now, I have spoken to many people ect.. and have lined up some work experience at a tier 1 in the summer..
    Thats a great start, but doesnt explain why you didnt do Maths at AS. Level.

    If you've been serious about this for a while you must realise that maths is literally the single most important skill?

    i'm not trying to be a **** - this WILL come up time and time again in interviews.
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    (Original post by L-J-B)
    The OP is looking for advice not anecdotes. My uncle is a stock broker and only gained a degree as a mature student. I dont see how this helps the OP? I was simply saying if you have enough drive there are other routes.
    Rofl at the irony.
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    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    Rofl at the irony.
    What irony, i gave an anecdote and then went on to say 'i dont see how this helps' this being an anaphoric reference to anecdotes.
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    Let me dispel a few myths.

    1.You don't need a strong affinity to maths, you don't need to be able to do matrix calculus in your head on the spot, they have computers for that. If you want to be a trader you just need to be able to do quick sums in your head, they to have structuring and quants to deal with maths. To get into investment banking (division) you don't need any maths. All you need a good work ethic. Further maths won't help you land any IB job only an offer to a good uni.

    2.Your university matters most. After Oxbrigde/LSE its hard to get into IB, after UCL/Warwick/Imperial it's very hard. Your actual degree is no more than a tick box to HR. Do maths and quantum physics at a non target and you're no where near getting into IB than if you did Accounting & Finance, though one is far more mathematical than the other.

    3.A first won't make it easier to get into IB.

    4.Hard work, networking at events (I can't stress just how important this one is) and drive will get you into IB

    5.This is the economics forum not the Investment Banking forum. There is a thread dedicated to these types of questions, please use it.
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    (Original post by L-J-B)
    What irony, i gave an anecdote and then went on to say 'i dont see how this helps' this being an anaphoric reference to anecdotes.
    Two sentances stated that anecdotes were useless, the third was an anecdote. What was the point of your post?
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    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    Two sentances stated that anecdotes were useless, the third was an anecdote. What was the point of your post?
    Im not really sure what this means?

    Would it not be common sense that if two candidates of fairly equal standing from the same university, one with a 2:1 one with a 1:1, we should expect in the majority of circumstances the 1:1 to get the job?

    A myth this may be however i do not see why. Also just to provide some anecdotal fun the drive for a 1:1 came from the associate lecturer at warwick...
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    CASS.
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    (Original post by L-J-B)
    Im not really sure what this means?

    Would it not be common sense that if two candidates of fairly equal standing from the same university, one with a 2:1 one with a 1:1, we should expect in the majority of circumstances the 1:1 to get the job?

    A myth this may be however i do not see why. Also just to provide some anecdotal fun the drive for a 1:1 came from the associate lecturer at warwick...
    For a trading job, a 2:1 in Maths would beat a 1st in a humanities, arts or several social-science subjects. All other things being equal.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Let me dispel a few myths.

    To get into investment banking (division) you don't need any maths. All you need a good work ethic. Further maths won't help you land any IB job only an offer to a good uni.
    The thread is about getting into university first and foremost... Not whether further maths helps you get a job in IB. If we assume that the majority of IB do go to a good uni which requires maths or further maths, then by reasoning in the majority of cases to get into IB requires maths.

    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    5.This is the economics forum not the Investment Banking forum. There is a thread dedicated to these types of questions, please use it.
    I believe the OP was looking at economics related courses rather than IB.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Let me dispel a few myths.

    1.You don't need a strong affinity to maths, you don't need to be able to do matrix calculus in your head on the spot, they have computers for that. If you want to be a trader you just need to be able to do quick sums in your head, they to have structuring and quants to deal with maths. To get into investment banking (division) you don't need any maths. All you need a good work ethic. Further maths won't help you land any IB job only an offer to a good uni.
    Bull****. Affinity for maths =/= ability to do advanced maths, granted. You definitely, definitely do need to demonstrate a serious comfortableness with manipulating numbers to do ANY kind of banking or trading job. FM demonstrates significant intelligence too which is a big plus.

    2.Your university matters most. After Oxbrigde/LSE its hard to get into IB, after UCL/Warwick/Imperial it's very hard. Your actual degree is no more than a tick box to HR. Do maths and quantum physics at a non target and you're no where near getting into IB than if you did Accounting & Finance, though one is far more mathematical than the other.
    This is a lot truer, but the subject of your degree is highly relevant. A maths, computer science or, to a lesser degree, Economics student will be significantly advantaged.
    3.A first won't make it easier to get into IB.
    Not true, the level of your degree isnt hugely important (a 2:1 wont be a disadvantage) but a 1st is a great 'impact' thing to have on your CV - it makes a great impression even before you've met them.
    4.Hard work, networking at events (I can't stress just how important this one is) and drive will get you into IB
    Don't forget luck, family connections (sad but true) and interview skills.
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    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    For a trading job, a 2:1 in Maths would beat a 1st in a humanities, arts or several social-science subjects. All other things being equal.
    Ahh, i see my error. I assumed we were all talking about economics or related degrees, in this area of the forum... Il make myself clearer next time.
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    (Original post by L-J-B)
    Ahh, i see my error. I assumed we were all talking about economics or related degrees, in this area of the forum... Il make myself clearer next time.
    a 2:1 in economics, for certain types of trading roles, would be an advantage over a 1st in an arts subject.
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    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    Bull****. Affinity for maths =/= ability to do advanced maths, granted. You definitely, definitely do need to demonstrate a serious comfortableness with manipulating numbers to do ANY kind of banking or trading job. FM demonstrates significant intelligence too which is a big plus.


    This is a lot truer, but the subject of your degree is highly relevant. A maths, computer science or, to a lesser degree, Economics student will be significantly advantaged.

    Not true, the level of your degree isnt hugely important (a 2:1 wont be a disadvantage) but a 1st is a great 'impact' thing to have on your CV - it makes a great impression even before you've met them.
    Don't forget luck, family connections (sad but true) and interview skills.
    Big thumbs up to this, i think however we are all trying to really give the same advice? Though it is only purportedly different.
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    I did read about some research relating tall people and higher ranking jobs. MD level people are on average taller than normal distribution would expect. so, if your tall....
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    (Original post by L-J-B)
    Warwick is generally very highly regarded for economics and mathmatics. There was a thread on here (if you search) that concluded...

    Oxbridge (either)
    (big gap)
    LSE and (slightly slightly marginally behind) Warwick
    (Gap)
    Durham, KCL etc
    (gap)
    brum, manchester

    any redbrick uni or russel group (or such equivilent) will put you in good stead.

    Having said that a bad degree (such as a fail) from a good uni isnt worth toffee... The course and uni that allows you to do the best you can is the way to go. Dont get too concerned about which uni is 'best'. I have a friend at birmingham for economics who loves it and chose it over other unis listed there. A happy student = a hardworking student!

    I hope this materially answers what you was looking for, however dont underestimate open days! get a good feel for each uni!
    Lol you have no idea. There is no difference between Oxbridge and LSE, and you've missed out UCL and Imperial....

    Tier 1) Oxford, Cambridge, LSE
    Tier 2) Imperial, Warwick, UCL
    Tier 3) Nottingham, Durham
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Let me dispel a few myths.

    1.You don't need a strong affinity to maths, you don't need to be able to do matrix calculus in your head on the spot, they have computers for that. If you want to be a trader you just need to be able to do quick sums in your head, they to have structuring and quants to deal with maths. To get into investment banking (division) you don't need any maths. All you need a good work ethic. Further maths won't help you land any IB job only an offer to a good uni.

    2.Your university matters most. After Oxbrigde/LSE its hard to get into IB, after UCL/Warwick/Imperial it's very hard. Your actual degree is no more than a tick box to HR. Do maths and quantum physics at a non target and you're no where near getting into IB than if you did Accounting & Finance, though one is far more mathematical than the other.

    3.A first won't make it easier to get into IB.

    4.Hard work, networking at events (I can't stress just how important this one is) and drive will get you into IB

    5.This is the economics forum not the Investment Banking forum. There is a thread dedicated to these types of questions, please use it.
    Let me dispel a few myths, fire breathing dragons do exist but sadly only in Jamaica. Look everyone now im also talking bull****.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    Lol you have no idea. There is no difference between Oxbridge and LSE, and you've missed out UCL and Imperial....

    Tier 1) Oxford, Cambridge, LSE
    Tier 2) Imperial, Warwick, UCL
    Tier 3) Nottingham, Durham
    I have no idea?

    I just gave the results from another thread. If youve read down youl see i make no attempt to claim it as my view.
    I was just trying to give the OP a rough idea of where people believe universities to lie in relation to each other.
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    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    Thats a great start, but doesnt explain why you didnt do Maths at AS. Level.

    If you've been serious about this for a while you must realise that maths is literally the single most important skill?

    i'm not trying to be a **** - this WILL come up time and time again in interviews.

    I have just sent of an email to my M/C of mathematics... to self teach over the summer period and take the exam in the winter term...
 
 
 
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