Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    From the networking I've done, if you want to get into trading, maths is very important. The general consensus I gleamed was that the universities we are all aware of will give you a big advantage. However if you are not studying a highly numerate degree you will more than likely be heading for a sales or IBD role rather than trading.

    Even economics is a contentious degree because it depends on your module choice whether it would be accepted as numerate or not. If you avoided all the numerate modules, economics would be about as much use as any arts/humanities subject for trading.

    No one is saying it is impossible to get into a trading role without a numerate degree at a specific university but it becomes vastly harder. The estimate I got was that around 10% of recruits are not from targeted universities and are considered "punts" by the banks for their potential trading aptitude. I was also told that these people usually work harder and do better than their illustrious peers.

    My advice would be to do the most numerate degree at the best university you can get into and if you aren't already, start trading your own account. The latter becomes more important the lower down the degree/university ladder you are.

    Good luck.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L-J-B)
    I have no idea?

    I just gave the results from another thread. If youve read down youl see i make no attempt to claim it as my view.
    I was just trying to give the OP a rough idea of where people believe universities to lie in relation to each other.
    Which thread is this faulty info in?
    Anyways, the information you posted is blatantly wrong. UCL and IC are target unis for Investment Banking, there's no denying it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    "No one is saying it is impossible to get into a trading role without a numerate degree at a specific university but it becomes vastly harder. The estimate I got was that around 10% of recruits are not from targeted universities and are considered "punts" by the banks for their potential trading aptitude. I was also told that these people usually work harder and do better than their illustrious peers."

    I have heard this aswell from someone who was on the prop desk at Jp morgan.......
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L-J-B)
    Warwick is generally very highly regarded for economics and mathmatics. There was a thread on here (if you search) that concluded...

    Oxbridge (either)
    (big gap)
    LSE
    and (slightly slightly marginally behind) Warwick
    (Gap)
    Durham, KCL etc
    (gap)
    brum, manchester

    any redbrick uni or russel group (or such equivilent) will put you in good stead.

    Having said that a bad degree (such as a fail) from a good uni isnt worth toffee... The course and uni that allows you to do the best you can is the way to go. Dont get too concerned about which uni is 'best'. I have a friend at birmingham for economics who loves it and chose it over other unis listed there. A happy student = a hardworking student!

    I hope this materially answers what you was looking for, however dont underestimate open days! get a good feel for each uni!

    What?

    That is utter...

    It's more like Oxbridge AND LSE, moderately large gap, Warwick then etc...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Is Cass business school any good, or would it be better to do a normal subject at a uni like Durham or manchester?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Another option you can consider is taking a gap year after a-lev and using it to get maths or even f. maths a-levels, then go on to do Economics & Maths or something similar at uni.

    You'd have to love maths to do that though (which I guess you dont).

    What makes you think you would like to be a trader out of interest?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CityTrader)
    Is Cass business school any good, or would it be better to do a normal subject at a uni like Durham or manchester?
    Traditional Uni with highly academic reputation always better.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    Another option you can consider is taking a gap year after a-lev and using it to get maths or even f. maths a-levels, then go on to do Economics & Maths or something similar at uni.

    You'd have to love maths to do that though (which I guess you dont).

    What makes you think you would like to be a trader out of interest?
    What makes me interested in trading is the way in which Macro issues impact the market and how currencies, stocks and commods react. and i love analyzing these issues and linking them to trading ideas ect...
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Anglia Ruskin.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by L-J-B)
    The thread is about getting into university first and foremost... Not whether further maths helps you get a job in IB. If we assume that the majority of IB do go to a good uni which requires maths or further maths, then by reasoning in the majority of cases to get into IB requires maths.



    I believe the OP was looking at economics related courses rather than IB.
    It doesn't work like that at all. Like many economics students get into IB doesn't mean Economics helps get you into IB, rather many economics students aim for IB hence many people from IB did economics. The OP wants to know what course gives him the best chance of getting into trading, the economics forum is not the place for this, this thread in the Investment Banking forum is.
    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    Bull****. Affinity for maths =/= ability to do advanced maths, granted. You definitely, definitely do need to demonstrate a serious comfortableness with manipulating numbers to do ANY kind of banking or trading job. FM demonstrates significant intelligence too which is a big plus.


    This is a lot truer, but the subject of your degree is highly relevant. A maths, computer science or, to a lesser degree, Economics student will be significantly advantaged.

    Not true, the level of your degree isnt hugely important (a 2:1 wont be a disadvantage) but a 1st is a great 'impact' thing to have on your CV - it makes a great impression even before you've met them.
    Don't forget luck, family connections (sad but true) and interview skills.
    - FM doesn't indicate significant intelligence, the uni i.e. Oxbridge/LSE does. HR don't cherry pick FM students, at best they might have a slight bias towards maths A level though it's unlikely. For trading yes you need to be comfortable with numbers but that doesn't mean you need a maths degree. You'll find A&F students doing trading yet their degree isn't mathematically challenging. And regardless they have numerical tests to prove you are comfortable, if you ace them yet you do Law they'll consider you. As long as you have a numerate degree you are fine, this doesn't mean the more numerate your degree is the better your chances.

    -You severely over estimate the use of a first. As long you as you have a 2.1 it's a tick and then to the next phase. Yes it might give you a few brownie points but they're more interested in extra curriculars and wait for it! * Competencies*. When you get to applying for jobs you'll hear this word endless amount of times, these will get you a job not a first.

    -Luck is always welcomed!

    @OP post this in the Investment Banking forum because generally the responses here have been week and full of people who heard from someone who heard from someone else or who never actually been through the process. Though they'd just generally just reiterate everything I've said.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    Another option you can consider is taking a gap year after a-lev and using it to get maths or even f. maths a-levels, then go on to do Economics & Maths or something similar at uni.

    You'd have to love maths to do that though (which I guess you dont).

    What makes you think you would like to be a trader out of interest?
    Ill tell you a story....

    when I first began my college, I did loathe maths and had no interest in it and I was in the bottom set.....set 6...... ( I fancied my chances of playing pro cricket) however after meeting a few people and reading about the industry I decided IB was where I want to be... I knew that maths was absolutely vital so I worked bloody hard on it and managed to get into set 2 in 2 years, i do regret not taking it at AS but if I apply the hard work over the summer holiday then who knows....I do actually enjoy maths and especially graphs and I do hold numerate ability otherwise I wouldn't be wasting my time.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reminisce)
    What?

    That is utter...

    It's more like Oxbridge AND LSE, moderately large gap, Warwick then etc...
    The little list i gave relates to economics generally not investment banking as this thread has seemingly become, and my post suggested that quantifying universities in such a way isnt actually all that helpful...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by arabcnesbit)
    From the networking I've done, if you want to get into trading, maths is very important. The general consensus I gleamed was that the universities we are all aware of will give you a big advantage. However if you are not studying a highly numerate degree you will more than likely be heading for a sales or IBD role rather than trading.

    Even economics is a contentious degree because it depends on your module choice whether it would be accepted as numerate or not. If you avoided all the numerate modules, economics would be about as much use as any arts/humanities subject for trading.

    No one is saying it is impossible to get into a trading role without a numerate degree at a specific university but it becomes vastly harder. The estimate I got was that around 10% of recruits are not from targeted universities and are considered "punts" by the banks for their potential trading aptitude. I was also told that these people usually work harder and do better than their illustrious peers.

    My advice would be to do the most numerate degree at the best university you can get into and if you aren't already, start trading your own account. The latter becomes more important the lower down the degree/university ladder you are.

    Good luck.
    Trading is such a vast field that is really very difficult to generalise and say that maths is the be all and end all.

    Yes, if you are trading exotic derivatives on a basket of currencies then the ability to understand the models and their limitations is very important so they like kids that are extremely comfortable with maths.

    But for the less esoteric stuff being able to do partially differentiated equations is really unimportant. I know of a macro hf manager who only uses 238.18 - 134.56, that is as far as is numeracy needs to go and he is at the pinnacle. So don't get too hung up on it.

    What you need to do is go for the university brand, brand>course choice. So go for brand and get some extra-curriculars to give yourself the best shot.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    It doesn't work like that at all. Like many economics students get into IB doesn't mean Economics helps get you into IB, rather many economics students aim for IB hence many people from IB did economics. The OP wants to know what course gives him the best chance of getting into trading, the economics forum is not the place for this, this thread in the Investment Banking forum is.


    - FM doesn't indicate significant intelligence, the uni i.e. Oxbridge/LSE does. HR don't cherry pick FM students, at best they might have a slight bias towards maths A level though it's unlikely. For trading yes you need to be comfortable with numbers but that doesn't mean you need a maths degree. You'll find A&F students doing trading yet their degree isn't mathematically challenging. And regardless they have numerical tests to prove you are comfortable, if you ace them yet you do Law they'll consider you. As long as you have a numerate degree you are fine, this doesn't mean the more numerate your degree is the better your chances.

    -You severely over estimate the use of a first. As long you as you have a 2.1 it's a tick and then to the next phase. Yes it might give you a few brownie points but they're more interested in extra curriculars and wait for it! * Competencies*. When you get to applying for jobs you'll hear this word endless amount of times, these will get you a job not a first.

    -Luck is always welcomed!

    @OP post this in the Investment Banking forum because generally the responses here have been week and full of people who heard from someone who heard from someone else or who never actually been through the process. Though they'd just generally just reiterate everything I've said.
    Great post, seconded.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by etrain1986)
    Trading is such a vast field that is really very difficult to generalise and say that maths is the be all and end all.

    Yes, if you are trading exotic derivatives on a basket of currencies then the ability to understand the models and their limitations is very important so they like kids that are extremely comfortable with maths.

    But for the less esoteric stuff being able to do partially differentiated equations is really unimportant. I know of a macro hf manager who only uses 238.18 - 134.56, that is as far as is numeracy needs to go and he is at the pinnacle. So don't get too hung up on it.

    What you need to do is go for the university brand, brand>course choice. So go for brand and get some extra-curriculars to give yourself the best shot.

    Cheers for that, this is what i feel as well, of course if you are on an exotic deriv trading desk then maths is going to be at the forefront of your work however if you are covering simple equities, commods or the FI market then its going to be more based around macro issues - which is what i am very much interested in!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L-J-B)
    The little list i gave relates to economics generally not investment banking as this thread has seemingly become, and my post suggested that quantifying universities in such a way isnt actually all that helpful...
    Okay but considering open days, friends and various other online resources, I'd say their economics course is very close or on par with Oxbridge tbh...
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by etrain1986)
    Great post, seconded.
    Thirded
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Go to Havard university
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HistoryRepeating)
    If you dont think you will be accepted to UCL Warwick or Nottingham what makes you think you'll be able to manage a career in the city?
    This.



    Also, apply to places where you know people who graduate often go on to achieve your target. Then, study, and only study. I have generally followed this rule (TSR being one of few exceptions, sports and music being others), and I do not regret it, plus it has led to a level of success on par with my original aspirations
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Van Grall)
    This.



    Also, apply to places where you know people who graduate often go on to achieve your target. Then, study, and only study. I have generally followed this rule (TSR being one of few exceptions, sports and music being others), and I do not regret it, plus it has led to a level of success on par with my original aspirations
    And what were your original aspirations....? :-)
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: April 9, 2011
The home of Results and Clearing

3,509

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  2. University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  3. Bishop Grosseteste University
    All Courses Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
Poll
Will you be tempted to trade up and get out of your firm offer on results day?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.