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    Hi! I'm going to be an NQT next year, and I'm currently looking for a full-time job for next year. I'm also interested in starting an MSc in Anthropology of Childhood, youth & education next year, but the part-time course requires a full day of uni attendance once a week. Does anyone know if it would be possible to have a full day off to attend uni?

    Cheers.
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    Probably not, but don't you already have 60 masters credits from your PGCE to put towards this?


    I know it probably doesn't answer your question, but I'm interested in what you can do with those masters credits.
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    Maybe if you secured a part-time position it would be possible because you'd only be available 4 days a week (would it be every week?) Working part-time would probably extend your NQT year though.

    I imagine that doing a masters during your NQT year would be a tough slog!! How are you finding the PGCE?
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    (Original post by Suzanathema)
    Probably not, but don't you already have 60 masters credits from your PGCE to put towards this?


    I know it probably doesn't answer your question, but I'm interested in what you can do with those masters credits.
    That's what I was thinking, but wasn't sure. Yes, I have 60 M level credits, but they wouldn't count towards this masters, at least I don't think they do (maybe for options). I'm really interested in traditional master in education. I'm hoping to teach for a few years (hopefully taking on a pastoral role, complete a masters during this time, and then move on to a PhD that combines the MSc I mentioned above and second language acquisition/socio-linguistics. I love teaching, but I want to conduct research as well, but I don't feel I'd be qualified unless I'm a teacher first.

    IoE has an okay masters similar to the one above, but it isn't the same.
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    (Original post by JupiterSunshine)
    Maybe if you secured a part-time position it would be possible because you'd only be available 4 days a week (would it be every week?) Working part-time would probably extend your NQT year though.

    I imagine that doing a masters during your NQT year would be a tough slog!! How are you finding the PGCE?
    Unfortunately, I don't believe I could afford to work part-time. I know it would be hard work, but I know several who have managed a masters whilst completing their NQT year.

    As for the PGCE, I'm finding it easier than I expected. The most frustrating thing is having no control over your placements or what classes you are given. It's also frustrating because you're a bit of an outsider, although this can vary from placement to placement. I was more included at my first placement, but I was the only PGCE in the department and one of four in total. At my second placement, there are 6 PGCE students in my department and 20 overall, so your less included by the faculty. It's not easy, but I still have plenty of time to have a life, and I'm doing well on the course! My observations are out of the way and I have one more 8,000 word essay to write over the half term.

    I just might be forced to postpone a masters for a year. After completing my NQT year, then maybe I could go part-time, just having one day off. Or, maybe I'll find a similar enough course.

    Thanks.
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    The masters credits you gain from your PGCE can only be used towards a masters in education. No university would let you transfer them towards a normal masters; and in this sense most applicants are being lied to about their usefulness. In fact, I think most universities would be dubious about the credits being at masters level at all. Just because the government want teaching to become a masters level profession does not mean it will actually happen.
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    (Original post by k1tsun3)
    That's what I was thinking, but wasn't sure. Yes, I have 60 M level credits, but they wouldn't count towards this masters, at least I don't think they do (maybe for options). I'm really interested in traditional master in education. I'm hoping to teach for a few years (hopefully taking on a pastoral role, complete a masters during this time, and then move on to a PhD that combines the MSc I mentioned above and second language acquisition/socio-linguistics. I love teaching, but I want to conduct research as well, but I don't feel I'd be qualified unless I'm a teacher first.

    IoE has an okay masters similar to the one above, but it isn't the same.

    Aaah I want to study second language acquisition and socioling too! :p:

    Good luck to you though.

    (Original post by evantej)
    The masters credits you gain from your PGCE can only be used towards a masters in education. No university would let you transfer them towards a normal masters; and in this sense most applicants are being lied to about their usefulness. In fact, I think most universities would be dubious about the credits being at masters level at all. Just because the government want teaching to become a masters level profession does not mean it will actually happen.

    Well, a masters in education is still better, for employment prospects in education, than no masters at all. You can always get a second one later if that floats your boat, right?
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    (Original post by Suzanathema)
    [...] Well, a masters in education is still better, for employment prospects in education, than no masters at all. You can always get a second one later if that floats your boat, right?
    Most teachers I have spoken to are even sceptical of it. Unless it improves what you get on the pay scale, I do not see any reason for wasting your time never mind your money on it (some local authorities pay for their teachers to do it, some do not). :confused:
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    (Original post by evantej)
    Most teachers I have spoken to are even sceptical of it. Unless it improves what you get on the pay scale, I do not see any reason for wasting your time never mind your money on it (some local authorities pay for their teachers to do it, some do not). :confused:

    Yeah, you have a good point.

    I must admit I was more excited about it when I thought I could put the credits towards a Masters in Linguistics.

    The M-level assignments will be good practice though!
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    (Original post by Suzanathema)
    Yeah, you have a good point.

    I must admit I was more excited about it when I thought I could put the credits towards a Masters in Linguistics.

    The M-level assignments will be good practice though!
    The M-level can't even be carried over into all Masters in Education programs, only to certain ones. I don't want it. I don't see the point. The masters I am interested in will be valuable, especially in education, more so for me personally than financially. Plus, it would help prepare me for the areas of Linguistics I am interested in.

    I would love to do a MA in Linguistics (especially as SOAS), but it's so hard to find a part-time evening course. That seems to be the case in England. I don't want to do my PhD here, but I'd like to complete my masters whilst teaching here. There's better funding elsewhere for PhDs.

    From the looks of it, I might just have to focus on my NQT year, complete the CELTA with YL, and then try and find a part-time position the following here, giving me the day I need to work on my masters.
 
 
 
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