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People in Year 12 or below: Are you still going to university now fees have risen? Watch

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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Agreed, and the newspapers will most likely pass it off as "less poor people going to university".

    But think about it, generally speaking, those who do Mickey Mouse courses are usually those from poorer-income backgrounds.
    Fewer poor people, you mean. I think it will definitely result in less poor people going. Good idea to get the grammar sorted before you apply to Oxford.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Agreed, and the newspapers will most likely pass it off as "less poor people going to university".

    But think about it, generally speaking, those who do Mickey Mouse courses are usually those from poorer-income backgrounds.
    Source?

    Just because you've put generally speaking in italics doesn't mean you don't have to back it up. People could be quite offended by that.
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    Definitely still going to *try to* go to university
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Agreed, and the newspapers will most likely pass it off as "less poor people going to university".

    But think about it, generally speaking, those who do Mickey Mouse courses are usually those from poorer-income backgrounds.
    how much can we bet that your from a well off background?? your out of touch of that world love
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    Yep I'm still going, it will definitely be a life changing experience for me. Plus Daddy is paying the fees anyway.


    Lol, just kidding.
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    (Original post by lonely_cupid)
    Yep I'm still going, it will definitely be a life changing experience for me. Plus Daddy is paying the fees anyway.


    Lol, just kidding.
    I'm in the dilemma of whether to apply to 'better' universities next year

    I wish 'Daddy' paid my fees... :laugh:
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    (Original post by ily_em)
    *aren't, surely?
    Oh crap! Thanks for that .

    EMZ=]
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    Really, the only problem for most people is the amount they got to pay back rather than the system. The worrying thing is the interest + debt. Not needing to pay until you get at least 21k a year isn't as bad as some people think though - lots of people won't pay off their debt :/...
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    (Original post by Keith Lemon)
    ****ing welsh, you do realise you, along with the Scots are living out of our back pockets?
    North sea oil tax revenue ----> Scotland contributing more than it is allocated.
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    (Original post by Dekota-XS)
    No one is overestimating the impact. It is fact that tuiton fees have risen, it is fact that cost of living has risen, it is fact that unemployment has risen and it is also fact that there is no guarantee of you getting a job after you graduate.
    It is also fact that the maintenence grants are rising. It is also fact tha if you don't get a job, you do not have to pay it back. It is also fact that if you get a poor paying job, you pay less bck than you do at the moment. It is also fact that everyone will be better off per month than they are now.
    Plus, people who keep talking about unemployment, by the time you graduate in 4 or 5 years time, that will most likely have changed.
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    To all yr 12
    Get ur moneys worth go to the bst uni and the bst course u possibly can
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    (Original post by vandub)
    It is also fact that the maintenence grants are rising. It is also fact tha if you don't get a job, you do not have to pay it back. It is also fact that if you get a poor paying job, you pay less bck than you do at the moment. It is also fact that everyone will be better off per month than they are now.
    Plus, people who keep talking about unemployment, by the time you graduate in 4 or 5 years time, that will most likely have changed.
    How do you mean if you get a poor paying job, you pay back less? Until you don't start an official graduate job of your field, you don't start paying the debt back. The interest is added to your loan monthly and once you start the job, the debt is paid monthly straight out of your wages meaning for the first few years of working, you won't be earning anything substantial.

    I think it will take longer than 4 or 5 years for the economy to pick up to the standards it was at pre-recession.
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    Nah, it hasn't put me off in the slightest.
    I want to study psychology MSci at UOB, when I leave uni if I do my post grad also then I might be in between 36,000 - 45,000 pounds worth of debt. But ohwell. I've been reading and apparently after you start earning something like 25,000 pound they take 9% of it a year out of it. Which tbh isn't bad.

    IMO it's even be in debt and have a good job, or work in mcdonalds all your life.
    I know what i'd rather choose! :')
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    (Original post by Dekota-XS)
    How do you mean if you get a poor paying job, you pay back less? Until you don't start an official graduate job of your field, you don't start paying the debt back. The interest is added to your loan monthly and once you start the job, the debt is paid monthly straight out of your wages meaning for the first few years of working, you won't be earning anything substantial.

    I think it will take longer than 4 or 5 years for the economy to pick up to the standards it was at pre-recession.
    You start paying the debt back when you earn over £21000 per year, regardless over whether its a "graduate" job or from selling cars on ebay. You pay 9% of everything you earn over £21000 so it certainly doesn't mean you "won't be earning anything substantial".

    I think the poster you quoted was referring to the rise in the payback threshold. At the moment you pay 9% of anything you earn over £15000. So under the new system you will be paying less per year than people do at the moment. But you will be paying for a lot longer (up to a max of 30 years) because you'll have a bigger debt to pay (including higher interest) and you're paying it off at a lower rate.

    If your salary is consistently below ~£22000 I reckon you'll be better off under the new system. Much higher than that and you'll pay more, which makes it a fairly progressive system. Pros and Cons of course.
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    (Original post by Consilio Et Animis)
    This thread makes me sad for all the Y12's. If I get the grades this year, I'll be studying pharmacy £3375a year. I'm from a low income background too, none of my parents can work and if I was in Y12 I'd have only applied to unis in the north west and had to seriously rethink everything.

    Don't let it put you off! Especially if you're hardworking, aim for those higher subjects and better universities. It will pay off
    I'm not criticising you, as obviously I don't know your circumstances, but why would you have only applied to local universities under the new system, or had to rethink things? The system for supporting living costs hasn't really changed, only the tuition fees which are roughly the same all over England. You'll have no extra up-front costs under the new system, and as universities will have more to spend on bursaries you could have potentially benefited.
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    (Original post by Dekota-XS)
    If SLC stopped giving out loans to students and went bust, students would be expected to pay £9,000 a year from their own pocket. Would you still go uni in this case? Can you afford it?
    Clearly the government would never allow that to happen, it would be bailed out.
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    (Original post by Dekota-XS)
    How do you mean if you get a poor paying job, you pay back less? Until you don't start an official graduate job of your field, you don't start paying the debt back. The interest is added to your loan monthly and once you start the job, the debt is paid monthly straight out of your wages meaning for the first few years of working, you won't be earning anything substantial.

    I think it will take longer than 4 or 5 years for the economy to pick up to the standards it was at pre-recession.
    What? Are you an idiot? It doesn't matter what kind of job you get, you pay it back based on your income, not job type.
    Secondly, of course you can still earn a substantial wage. Imagine you get £25,000 in your job annually. You're gonna be paying 9% of (25000-21000), so £360 a year. Does that seem so substantial to you, especially that considering under the old system you'd be paying back £900 a year if you're on £25,000.
    Everyone pays back less per month, most people will just be paying for longer.
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    (Original post by rugbyladosc)
    Yeah I blame Westminster!

    But the system is flawed from your end too. Why should we pay for you to go to uni through our taxes whilst we have to pay full wack? I hope its gets passed for your sake but it just seems unfair. We all pay taxes to central government so we should all reap the benefits given equally.
    OKAY fair enough. But still you get stuff from our tax revenue that we don't. And you get 500 - 600£ more money per head for education .
    And btw im a girl (earlier u referred to me as him, not that it matters.
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    (Original post by Keith Lemon)
    ****ing welsh, you do realise you, along with the Scots are living out of our back pockets?

    **** off with your negs, you foreign *******s.
    Haha, :mfing:.
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    Im still going to Uni The fact that the fees have changed doesnt really bother me too much. Im still probably going to be in debt, it'll just take longer to pay back :^_^:
 
 
 
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