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    Is this a hot topic? I'm currently researching MSc subjects and it seems most of the Russell Group universities have this as a MSc along with cancer.

    Imperial have it with a 2.2 entry requirement, I'm very tempted to apply.
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    Well, monoclonal antibodies are the big thing right now.
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    (Original post by Taffy Duck)
    Well, monoclonal antibodies are the big thing right now.
    Someone has been reading their AS level biology textbook recently.
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    (Original post by niceday)
    Is this a hot topic? I'm currently researching MSc subjects and it seems most of the Russell Group universities have this as a MSc along ewith cancer.

    Imperial have it with a 2.2 entry requirement, I'm very tempted to apply.
    I hear cytokines are really making a storm these days.
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    (Original post by niceday)
    Is this a hot topic? I'm currently researching MSc subjects and it seems most of the Russell Group universities have this as a MSc along ewith cancer.

    Imperial have it with a 2.2 entry requirement, I'm very tempted to apply.
    Immunology is a rapidly advancing field.

    Got a friend doing a PhD in cancer immunology, he is trying to find ways to "teach" the immune system to stop progression of cancer. Sounds interesting as hell
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    msc in a medical/biological science in the UK 90% of the time is a waste of money. most people i know working on phds in my faculty came straight in from bsc.
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    Immunology and Oncology are two of my favourite fields of study, especially at BSc / MSc level because there's still alot of research to be done and therapies and methods to be discovered. You do need a real passion in these areas or else it will be mind numbingly boring.
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    (Original post by navarre)
    Someone has been reading their AS level biology textbook recently.
    I'm a Pharmacology graduate, so shove it.
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    (Original post by Taffy Duck)
    Well, monoclonal antibodies are the big thing right now.
    :congrats:
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    (Original post by thisismycatch22)
    msc in a medical/biological science in the UK 90% of the time is a waste of money. most people i know working on phds in my faculty came straight in from bsc.
    I don't want to do a PhD.
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    (Original post by niceday)
    I don't want to do a PhD.
    What do you want a master's for then? It's not going to help you very much in any science related jobs. Without a PhD there's a very low glass ceiling in any career that would look favourably on a science master's. If it's just for your own amusement I guess go for it but there are less expensive hobbies, to put it mildly!

    The only thing it would be materially useful for is improving your academic record for jobs or grad medicine courses that need a 2:1 if you got a desmond, or if you went to an ex-poly and want an easy way to get a more reputable university on your cv for shallow careers that look favourably on big name unis...

    edit: wait, how many threads have you made about biomedical mscs?! you've got your answer a dozen times over every time you posted this thread. post graduate mscs are, generally speaking, a cash cow unlikely to help your career. if you're just doing it because you're bored and want something to spend thousands of pounds on while not having a job, any msc is going to cover the latest research and "hot topics" regardless of whether you do immunology or biochemistry. just go for whatever subject you enjoy, at a decent uni. but even at the decent unis, be prepared for it to be reheated 3rd year lectures that they give their bsc students.
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    (Original post by thisismycatch22)
    What do you want a master's for then? It's not going to help you very much in any science related jobs. Without a PhD there's a very low glass ceiling in any career that would look favourably on a science master's. If it's just for your own amusement I guess go for it but there are less expensive hobbies, to put it mildly!

    The only thing it would be materially useful for is improving your academic record for jobs or grad medicine courses that need a 2:1 if you got a desmond, or if you went to an ex-poly and want an easy way to get a more reputable university on your cv for shallow careers that look favourably on big name unis...
    Ha that's the reason. (my UG was in a top RG university)
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    (Original post by niceday)
    Ha that's the reason. (my UG was in a top RG university)
    oh, fair enough then, was wondering why you'd posted it here. good luck! nottingham and SGUL accept gep applicants with 2:2s without an MSc, by the way. you've probably thought of those or applied to them already, but it's something to consider.
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    It's a really interesting subject, and yes you're right, Imperial have a great course with (surprisingly) low entry requirements and relatively low fees too.
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    Masters are looked upon reasonably favourably within medicine, at lower grades they're worth the same as a bachelors 1st but when applying for reg and above jobs you'd be better with one in an applicable subject and, as always, the more recent the better.
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    (Original post by No Future)
    I hear cytokines are really making a storm these days.
    I like this a lot!

    On another note, out of Imperial, UCL and Kings for Immunology/Infection and Immunity, does anyone have any pros and cons for each? As far as I can see, they all have a good reputation internationally and I can't really differentiate much from them - especially from the prospectuses for each which just say 'our university is amazing'. Thanks!
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    (Original post by Musicman95)
    I like this a lot!

    On another note, out of Imperial, UCL and Kings for Immunology/Infection and Immunity, does anyone have any pros and cons for each? As far as I can see, they all have a good reputation internationally and I can't really differentiate much from them - especially from the prospectuses for each which just say 'our university is amazing'. Thanks!
    Well my cousin is working at the Infection and Immunity research centre at Imperial and its really huge ! I've been there just once as they're are really strict about letting people enter, but its all sooooo interesting. I coudn't stop talking about it for days ! Lots of fancy equipments that I've never seen before :rolleyes:
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    I would think that with research money becoming tighter and increasing competition from other graduates then a Masters can be useful for establishing funding. The BSc in scientific subjects seems to be on its way out for the 4-year MSci. If your course is only a BSc, it might be difficult to get this funding even if your grade is top notch.

    Given the criteria the NHS uses it also gives you an additional chance to do some research (hopefully published) and will count towards your tally in terms of education if you do become a medic. If you don't do a PhD it won't do much to really further your science career though.

    I'm finishing one myself, and I've learnt a ton and definitely become a better scientist for it. A big reason though was that it gave me an extra year to delay medicine applications while still allowing for progress towards the PhD, which is a much larger commitment. The gamble seemed to pay off, since I'm starting a GEP program in September.
 
 
 
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