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    Hello everyone, this is my first thread on this forum so please bear with me

    I've just got accepted into TCD to do an M.Phil in Literary Translation. (it's a taught course rather than research). Does anyone here have experience of post graduate study at TDC, or know anyone who's done a Masters there?

    I was also looking at funding and it seems that there's none from the uni for taught courses, only research. I'll probably have to borrow money from my parents, but if anyone has any info about external funding, it would be appreciated. (the TDC site mentioned local authority funding, but I thought this was just for undergrad study?)

    Thanks in advance for any info.
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    I'm an undergrad at Trinity, but I plan to continue on as a postgrad at some stage, and I have friends doing postgrad courses, so I hope I can provide a bit of insight.

    Postgrad at Trinity seems to be highly regarded. Certainly as regards facilities etc., we have a copyright library, and postgrads have quite extensive borrowing rights, as well as a dedicated postgrad reading room (the beautiful 1937 building). Literary Translation is based in the School of Languages, Literatures & Cultural Studies. I have a friend doing their European Studies master's, which shares some courses with the LT people, and she loves the course and the classes, and it seems to be very well-run, with good interaction between staff & students.

    As regards funding, there is VERY little for taught courses in Ireland. The local authority grant only applies to Irish citizens, and I think you have to have been receiving a grant as an undergrad in order to continue it to postgrad (i.e. I don't think you can apply as a postgrad for the first time, it has to be a continuation from undergrad).

    The School did have a handful of studentships for people accepted onto its taught courses for 2010/2011: I know of it because my European Studies friend got one! But I don't see them listed on the Graduate Studies webpage- it might be worth contacting them or the School to ask if it'll be running again? Otherwise I'm afraid all the other College funding is for research; similarly, IRCHSS (the Irish equivalent of the AHRC) only offers research funding.

    I hope you enjoy Trinity, it is a special place, and you've picked a lovely course- the departments involved are all fantastic
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    Thanks for your reply, it's good to get an insider opinion!

    Yes I saw the thing about the studentships when I was applying, but now I can't seem to find it anymore. There's no mention of them on the course website either. Hmm I'll have to do a bit more research into it. I'm live in Northern Ireland so my passport is British...I suppose any funding that's available under the British system would only apply to UK institutions?

    The other thing I'm anxious about is meeting people in Dublin, as I don't know anyone there. I've heard that TDC is very competitive and there's a lot of pressure on students. Obviously I'll be working hard for my Master's, but I want to socialise as well. Do you find that as a student there you're able to balance your work and social life?

    Thanks again!
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    I don't know much about Northern Irish/UK funding, but there might be a few North/South-type scholarships available- did you do your undergrad in the North? I know, for example, of one scholarship for which I was entered for political science, (though it was more an essay competition) which had a crossborder emphasis.

    TCD is competitive, but then so is any university really, to some extent! Interestingly, my friends who are currently pursuing Master's in TCD having done their undergrad there, find that their non-TCD colleagues are the most competitive! Maybe it's something to do with being familiar with the set-up and the staff which makes them seem a bit more relaxed, but they find their coursemates (not all, but some) are very intense. Trinity certainly pushes you, but I wouldn't worry too much about it being horribly competitive.

    As for meeting people, it's a great place. TCD is a city centre campus, and it has a really active clubs & societies scene: there's bound to be something you can join & meet people that way. Otherwise, the postgrad classes tend to be very small, so it's easy to chat to people, and I know some departments like to bring their students out to dinners etc., so you'll probably get to know your coursemates relatively quickly. Of course, you are in the middle of Dublin, so if the College's social scene doesn't do it for you, then you have all that Dublin has to offer as well.

    I love Trinity, I'm sad that my undergrad experience is ending (I'm a final-year student). I've never found it too difficult to balance work & social life, you do have crazy-intense periods at times with deadlines etc, but I have loved both the course (I'm a history & politics student) and the social life- I've made some amazing friends
 
 
 
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