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48÷2(9+3) = ? watch

  • View Poll Results: 48/2(9+3)
    2
    117
    52.47%
    288
    106
    47.53%

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    (Original post by Sovietpride)
    Nobody is arguing that division or multiplication take precedence. Unless they're silly anyway because they don't.

    What i'm arguing is why you've removed the brackets when they're simply not done with yet?
    I'm sorry, I think we've reached communication breakdown
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    (Original post by IchiCC)
    I'm sorry, I think we've reached communication breakdown
    Meh. I blame the question <.<
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    and yes it does make a difference, that's my whole point!
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    There is no right answer.

    (48/2)(9+3) = 288
    48/(2(9+3)) = 2
    48/2(9+3) is indeterminate. It's simply extremely poor notation.
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    (Original post by DFranklin)
    I'd be fascinated to know how many people also think that

    (-b +/- sqrt(b^2-4ac))/2a is the same as ((-b +/- sqrt(b^2-4ac))/2)a ...

    Edit: or equivalently (-b \pm \sqrt{b^2-4ac)}/2a = ((-b \pm \sqrt{b^2-4ac})/2)a
    there must be a lovely set of solutions for those variables which would make it true
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    I'd argue that 48/2(9+3) is not the same as 48/2*(9+3)
    In the former, due to juxtaposition, I'd do 2(12) first, but in the later, I'd use the left to right rule, getting 2 in the former and 288 in the latter. The way I see it is juxtaposition implies parantheses so when I see ab, I think (ab), and likewise when I see 2(9+3), I think (2(9+3)). I'd imagine if it was meant as (48/2), 24 would have been used instead.

    I can definitely see arguments for both answers though and my original answer before thinking about it was 288.
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    have fun with that
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    Now that I think of, if you follow BODMAS, you should divide before the multiplication.

    The answer is 288
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    I don't understand how it can be 288.
    I still think its 2.

    Could someone explain please?

    thanks



    Edit: to the person who negged me, is curiosity a sin?
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    (Original post by smiffhead)
    there must be a lovely set of solutions for those variables which would make it true
    a=1
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    There is no right answer.

    (48/2)(9+3) = 288
    48/(2(9+3)) = 2
    48/2(9+3) is indeterminate. It's simply extremely poor notation.
    To go further, in terms of intent, if I saw:

    48/2 (9+3) I'd interpret it as 288 (almost certainly)
    48/ 2(9+3) I'd interpret as 2 (almost certainly)
    48 / 2(9+3) I'd interpret as 2 (probably)

    48/2(9+3) is very hard to call.

    If written by a university level mathematician, I'd be pretty confident she meant 2.
    If written by a GCSE student I'd be pretty confident he meant 288.
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    (Original post by Miss Anonymous)
    [SIZE=&quot;7&quot;]I don't understand how it can be 288.
    I still think its 2.

    Could someone explain please?

    thanks
    [/SIZE]
    This 48/2(9+3) could be either

     \[\frac{48}{2(12)}= \frac{48}{24}= 2

    or

     (\frac{48}{2})(9+3) = 24(12) = 288\]
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    (Original post by Jallenbah)
    Where the hell did you get that? It's entirely wrong.
    It's just one of many ways of writing the question - point still stands that the answer is 2 no amount of theorying is gonna change it :s
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    There is no right answer.

    (48/2)(9+3) = 288
    48/(2(9+3)) = 2
    48/2(9+3) is indeterminate. It's simply extremely poor notation.
    I wonder why it has taken 11 pages of people arguing to realise that it is simply ambiguous.

    I would suggest it is probably intended to be 2, because using a "/" sign you would normally bracket the denominator. Since whoever set this question has not, I assume they meant the denominator of the fraction to be the remainder of the sum, from left to right.

    That said, the notation is ambiguous so this is a pointless discussion.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    There is no right answer.

    (48/2)(9+3) = 288
    48/(2(9+3)) = 2
    48/2(9+3) is indeterminate. It's simply extremely poor notation.
    No. There is an unambiguous order of preference. Brackets, Indices, then Multiplication and Division, then Addition and Subtraction.
    If the precedence is equal, i.e. Multiplication and Division, then you go left to right.

    Always.
    There is no debate.
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    (Original post by Fallen)
    I wonder why it has taken 11 pages of people arguing to realise that it is simply ambiguous.

    I would suggest it is probably intended to be 2, because using a "/" sign you would normally bracket the denominator. Since whoever set this question has not, I assume they meant the denominator of the fraction to be the remainder of the sum, from left to right.

    That said, the notation is ambiguous so this is a pointless discussion.
    It is NOT ambiguous unless you DON'T UNDERSTAND IT.


    There is an unambiguous order of preference. Brackets, Indices, then Multiplication and Division, then Addition and Subtraction.
    If the precedence is equal, i.e. Multiplication and Division, then you go left to right.
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    Can't these threads be closed?

    Don't know why anyone would think anything bar 2.
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    Close thread please. This is ****ing ridiculous.
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    Personally, I would say 2 since:
    48/2(9+3)
    = 48/(2*12)
    = 48/24
    = 2

    But it depends whether you consider multiplication or division to be more important, since this is also true:
    48/2 * (9+3)
    = 24 * 12
    = 288

    Of course, if we think rationally. If one is doing a sum in real life (i.e. one that is not a question on an exam) it is almost impossible that such a situation should arise since it would be more clearly written:
    (48/2)*(9+3) = ?
    or 48/(2*(9+3)) = ?
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    (Original post by Miss Anonymous)
    I don't understand how it can be 288.
    I still think its 2.

    Could someone explain please?

    thanks
    (Original post by Miss Anonymous)
    I think it's 2.
    And so does my calculator
    Using the rules of BODMAS, the answer is 288 and also according to my calculator (I typed in 48/2(9+3)) the answer is 288.
 
 
 

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