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    Hi all,
    I am an American student from California and I recently received an offer at UCL for Languages and Culture (Spanish and Arabic). I'm looking to learn more about what what college life is like in the UK, especially how it might differ from a US school. I've received offers from some US colleges but am very interested in UCL.

    Please share your experiences with me!
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    Most people here haven't been to US college so you're better off asking questions about things you're interested in rather than looking for a comparative experience.
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    Well, I can assume a good point would be is that you can drink legally here at 18

    We don't have a Greek system, but I thought its quite redundant anyway because mostly everyone moves into a house after the first year.

    All I can think of really.
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    I finished my undergrad in California - Languages and Cultures Major, French - after taking a long break from school. I will be attending UCL this year for my post graduate degree.

    The benefit of school in the US is that it is much easier to change your mind if you decide your major is not for you. Your first two years are general education classes and a few major classes which gives you time to see if this is indeed what you would like to be studying. UK schools tend to focus on your subject alot more (not as many gen ed classes), so if you decide midstream to do something else, then you might have to start almost completely over. The bonus is that most undergrad in the UK is only 3 years instead of the normal 4+ in the US. So if you're fairly certain of your path, then I'd recommend going the UK route, simply because you get more time to study topics actually related to your major, and it opens up alot of opportunities especially in anything related to international studies, like yours. I wish I had done at least a study abroad for a year, to really get grounded in my languages of choice. I found that US undergrad did not require as many major classes, which made me feel a little behind in overall knowledge on my topics. However, a big consideration should also be expenses. If you have unlimited funding then it doesn't matter. If you are at all on a budget then consider going to the best but also the most economical school you can in the US. Debt after graduation will seriously limit your choices on jobs, further schooling, and other opportunities.
    I am finding out that to work in the International development field, or anything like it, you are competing with alot of people who have Masters degrees or PHDs. The field is extremely competitive, this is why I am going back to school as well. I am also choosing to go in Europe because MA and MSc are one year, instead of the US two, and the cost per year is the same so I'm paying half of what my sister did for a similar degree. Not to mention London is an amazing place for any kind of charitable, int'l company, ngo work....not sure what you'd like to do. It is also great because you do not have to pay out for a car, insurance, gas, etc. Metro and buses make it so very easy and inexpensive to get anywhere you need to go.
    So*L In closing....if money isn't an issue or if you're looking at private schools in the US that would cost about the same then I would seriously consider Europe because of the contacts you'll make and UCL is an amazing school. The experience of living abroad will change you profoundly. If money IS an issue, then I would do undergrad at home, as cheap as you can, and study abroad if possible and/or go to grad school in Europe.

    Hope I didn't ramble on too long, and I hope that it helps!
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    (Original post by Nikkisong)
    I finished my undergrad in California - Languages and Cultures Major, French - after taking a long break from school. I will be attending UCL this year for my post graduate degree.

    The benefit of school in the US is that it is much easier to change your mind if you decide your major is not for you. Your first two years are general education classes and a few major classes which gives you time to see if this is indeed what you would like to be studying. UK schools tend to focus on your subject alot more (not as many gen ed classes), so if you decide midstream to do something else, then you might have to start almost completely over. The bonus is that most undergrad in the UK is only 3 years instead of the normal 4+ in the US. So if you're fairly certain of your path, then I'd recommend going the UK route, simply because you get more time to study topics actually related to your major, and it opens up alot of opportunities especially in anything related to international studies, like yours. I wish I had done at least a study abroad for a year, to really get grounded in my languages of choice. I found that US undergrad did not require as many major classes, which made me feel a little behind in overall knowledge on my topics. However, a big consideration should also be expenses. If you have unlimited funding then it doesn't matter. If you are at all on a budget then consider going to the best but also the most economical school you can in the US. Debt after graduation will seriously limit your choices on jobs, further schooling, and other opportunities.
    I am finding out that to work in the International development field, or anything like it, you are competing with alot of people who have Masters degrees or PHDs. The field is extremely competitive, this is why I am going back to school as well. I am also choosing to go in Europe because MA and MSc are one year, instead of the US two, and the cost per year is the same so I'm paying half of what my sister did for a similar degree. Not to mention London is an amazing place for any kind of charitable, int'l company, ngo work....not sure what you'd like to do. It is also great because you do not have to pay out for a car, insurance, gas, etc. Metro and buses make it so very easy and inexpensive to get anywhere you need to go.
    So*L In closing....if money isn't an issue or if you're looking at private schools in the US that would cost about the same then I would seriously consider Europe because of the contacts you'll make and UCL is an amazing school. The experience of living abroad will change you profoundly. If money IS an issue, then I would do undergrad at home, as cheap as you can, and study abroad if possible and/or go to grad school in Europe.

    Hope I didn't ramble on too long, and I hope that it helps!
    sorry you did.
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    (Original post by Extricated)
    sorry you did.
    Well lucky for you, it wasn't your thread/question.
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    Go to UCL, London.
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    Ahhhh, I'm in the same boat. But I think I will turn down UCL so I can study Philosophy and German at Bristol, rather than just Philosophy at UCL. As Nikkisong said, it is significantly harder to change your major in the UK. Also, UCL is an expensive school because of housing costs and the lack of student funding for international students. That said, I think studying in London will look far better to an employer than finishing your degree in the US. Plus, living outside your country will be a great experience (that's why I'm leaving).

    I would like to hear what you decide since I'm in a similar situation XD

    All the best!

    EDIT: This is important! Many people will tell you that studying in London should be a major deciding factor, but this isn't necessarily true. As a student, you will be studying more than you will be touring the city. Also, it is expensive to have fun in London (I heard that it isn't uncommon for UCL students to stay in on a Friday night to save money). Lastly, just because you will be in London does not mean you'll be drinking your tea at the Ritz! You will be on a (very) tight budget, and your experience will reflect your wallet. Be sure to take that into account.
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    What are your available college options in the States?
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    (Original post by jennayne)
    Hi all,
    I am an American student from California and I recently received an offer at UCL for Languages and Culture (Spanish and Arabic). I'm looking to learn more about what what college life is like in the UK, especially how it might differ from a US school. I've received offers from some US colleges but am very interested in UCL.

    Please share your experiences with me!
    There are no sororities/frats and Uni life is alot more boring than US counterparts. The STUDENT life however is a lot more interesting, although all the events have to be organized by the student body (i.e. the union) which sometimes can be a bit hectic/poorly ran. Professors here have a more 'hands-off' approach; they set less homework generally and expect you to go out and find out stuff yourself. Especially when it comes to exams, as some professors won't even cover exam material at all!



    Oh and we're not as strong on the FWB's
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    (Original post by jennayne)
    Hi all,
    I am an American student from California and I recently received an offer at UCL for Languages and Culture (Spanish and Arabic). I'm looking to learn more about what what college life is like in the UK, especially how it might differ from a US school. I've received offers from some US colleges but am very interested in UCL.

    Please share your experiences with me!
    start learning now, we call it university not college.
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    (Original post by magnum.opus)
    Ahhhh, I'm in the same boat. But I think I will turn down UCL so I can study Philosophy and German at Bristol, rather than just Philosophy at UCL. As Nikkisong said, it is significantly harder to change your major in the UK. Also, UCL is an expensive school because of housing costs and the lack of student funding for international students. That said, I think studying in London will look far better to an employer than finishing your degree in the US. Plus, living outside your country will be a great experience (that's why I'm leaving).

    I would like to hear what you decide since I'm in a similar situation XD

    All the best!

    EDIT: This is important! Many people will tell you that studying in London should be a major deciding factor, but this isn't necessarily true. As a student, you will be studying more than you will be touring the city. Also, it is expensive to have fun in London (I heard that it isn't uncommon for UCL students to stay in on a Friday night to save money). Lastly, just because you will be in London does not mean you'll be drinking your tea at the Ritz! You will be on a (very) tight budget, and your experience will reflect your wallet. Be sure to take that into account.
    something you should know, no one calls it major here. Are you American? is so you must be arrogant
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    (Original post by Ventura7)
    something you should know, no one calls it major here. Are you American? is so you must be arrogant
    Oh please. Trod elsewhere troll
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    i have two american flatmates here on the junior year abroad scheme and they both love it
 
 
 
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