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is a computer networking degree useless if... watch

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    i have only basic certifications and little experience?
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    Probably.
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    informative
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    A degree will help you fulfil the academic requirement of a job. Other than that it is usually down to experience.
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    tbh would be cheaper if you go down the cisco comptia route then getting degree plus they pay better
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    (Original post by FinalMH)
    tbh would be cheaper if you go down the cisco comptia route then getting degree plus they pay better
    what? How can they pay better? Unless you mean in terms of qualifications. The comptia stuff are pretty useless really. What you want is the CCNA and the CCNP/CCSA and CCSP if doing networking
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    (Original post by de_monies)
    what? How can they pay better? Unless you mean in terms of qualifications. The comptia stuff are pretty useless really. What you want is the CCNA and the CCNP/CCSA and CCSP if doing networking
    hey i did say Cisco! normally you would do Comptia as your starting point then go off to get your ccna ccnp/ccsa

    sorry what i said was very vague but i think you get my point
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    In all honesty I wouldn't do the Comptia stuff at all. I'd rather do a networking course at college first. Also most networking degrees have at least the CCNA curriculum merged in - my course has the CCNA and the CCNP merged in
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    Better off with at least a BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree along with network certificates (CCNA, CCNP etc). You will without a doubt cover networks in your degree and receive a more rounded education exploring almost every area. You could also specialise in networks towards the end of the degree.

    But really, certificates are typically most useful only when you have actual real-world work experience to back it up. Having said that, you may not even need them at all, Computer Science + year in industry which covers networks in your job description, and you're set. If certificates are required, your company will inform you and probably pay for it.
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Better off with at least a BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree along with network certificates (CCNA, CCNP etc). You will without a doubt cover networks in your degree and receive a more rounded education exploring almost every area. You could also specialise in networks towards the end of the degree.

    But really, certificates are typically most useful only when you have actual real-world work experience to back it up. Having said that, you may not even need them at all, Computer Science + year in industry which covers networks in your job description, and you're set. If certificates are required, your company will inform you and probably pay for it.
    The problem is Computer Science covers a wide range of subjects but at many Unis the material covered is very theoretical and also requires a lot of interest in maths and programming.

    My guess is people looking at Networking type degrees do not want to do in depth analysis of algorithims/computational/mathematical complexities.

    TBH I'm not even sure if it is necessary to have a degree to get into networking...
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    (Original post by BigV)

    TBH I'm not even sure if it is necessary to have a degree to get into networking...
    You don't however it does mean that if you do have a degree, you can "one up" someone else, and if you got your degree from a reputable uni for networking (ie: Stafford/BCU) Even a degree at Leeds Met may mean that you get through the hoops that organisations set out for you, but if it's a pick up between a Leeds Met student vs a Stafford/BCU student, then you'd probably pick the latter
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    (Original post by de_monies)
    You don't however it does mean that if you do have a degree, you can "one up" someone else, and if you got your degree from a reputable uni for networking (ie: Stafford/BCU) Even a degree at Leeds Met may mean that you get through the hoops that organisations set out for you, but if it's a pick up between a Leeds Met student vs a Stafford/BCU student, then you'd probably pick the latter
    Ok well fair enough. I don't know enough detail about networking to comment on what Uni is good/respected etc.
    I guess the point I was trying to make when quoting FF was that telling someone to take a CS degree when they want to get into Networks seems a bit pointless when most CS degrees are heavily focused on software programming.

    I mean, I have the choice between Computing @ Leicester or Information management and Computing @ Loughborough. I'm sure both would touch on the basics of networking but will obviously focus more on the software programming side.

    If I wanted to do networking afterwards I'm sure I would have very little hope of competing with guys who have a Bsc Computer Networks degree plus all the Cisco and Microsoft certs.
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    (Original post by BigV)
    Ok well fair enough. I don't know enough detail about networking to comment on what Uni is good/respected etc.
    I guess the point I was trying to make when quoting FF was that telling someone to take a CS degree when they want to get into Networks seems a bit pointless when most CS degrees are heavily focused on software programming.
    Bang on. That's the reason why I didn't do "computing" or "computer science" or "software development" In all fairness, you don't really need a degree for programming either(ie: you could self learn), but because programming is so competitive now, you need a degree to get any where. Most CS degrees are basically programming and maths as you said
 
 
 
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