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Acoustic guitar - plectrum or no plectrum?? watch

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    New to acoustic guitar, learning basic chords. However, finding it harder to use a plec than using my fingers - fingers feels more natural and seems to work better, but everyone ive spoken to advises using a plec. how do all you TSR-ers play? plec or no plec?

    Ta!
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    When strumming with your fingers the sound becomes more about the collection of notes rather than the CHING when you strum. You can make a much larger variety of sounds with your fingers than you can with a plectrum. In that sense, using a plectrum limits your strumming techniques.
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    I very rarely use a plectrum on acoustic -- only if I am playing pieces with very quick acoustic lines in them, e.g. something that is supposed to be played on electric. The only time I do use one is when I play Chet Baker-esque fingerpicking stuff and then I use a thumb pick.

    As the above poster said, fingers are so much more versatile especially when you consider the importance of dynamics in acoustic pieces which isn't such an issue on an electric guitar.

    Save plectrums for electric guitar, and if you do need one for your acoustic - use a thumb pick.
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    If you learn to use a plectrum as you go, it makes everything so much easier at the end; once you get used to it, chords are clearer and have a better timbre, and strumming and picking quickly become possible. I'm definitely of the opinion that using a pick should be the default, and fingerstyles when necessary. Ultimately it's up to you, but I think using a plectrum just gives you more options
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    Personally, I'd never use a plectrum with an acoustic. I much prefer the softer sound of using fingers. When rock bands play their songs acoustically they usually use plectrums though, it gives a much cleaner punchier sound (but kinda sterile and soul-less IMO).

    So really, it depends how you want it to sound, the same song can sound very different depending on how you play it. There's nothing wrong with using a plectrum if that's the sound you want.
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    (Original post by applemilk1992)
    New to acoustic guitar, learning basic chords. However, finding it harder to use a plec than using my fingers - fingers feels more natural and seems to work better, but everyone ive spoken to advises using a plec. how do all you TSR-ers play? plec or no plec?

    Ta!
    Maybe you could start out with the highly flexible/thinner plecs first, easier to strum in my opinion
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    Fingers all the way. It's all about the feel of the strings Also, it's much easier to control the volume of the sound.

    Out of curiosity, how many fingers do you guys use to strum the guitar?
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    fingers, everytime.
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    (Original post by Ergo)
    Fingers all the way. It's all about the feel of the strings Also, it's much easier to control the volume of the sound.

    Out of curiosity, how many fingers do you guys use to strum the guitar?
    Three fingers. I use four fingers for fingerpicking though
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    I'm just starting to learn the guitar (teaching myself) and I find I just cannot use plecs! They just don't feel right! Also they make it much louder and I feel guilty about disturbing my flatmates!
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    (Original post by asdfz)
    Three fingers. I use four fingers for fingerpicking though
    I use three fingers for strumming too. Four when I wanna have some loud rock n roll
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    Get a thumb pick.
    Great wee gadget, gives you the best of both worlds.

    I did try to learn the guitar a long time ago, couldnt get past a few wee easy riffs and basic chords.
    But I had so much fun practising the finger picking over and over...

    Also, you may want to just grow your thumb nail a little longer than normal and use that, just don't go down the route of painting it black to toughen it up !!!

    EDIT: And NO!, I did not use finger picks, what I did was set myself into auto mode and just kept on doing the finger pick exercises over and over. Back then I would spend a lot of time in Chat rooms with voice enabled, so twas easy to practice like mad while chattin.
    Was also a good place for motivation as a few others out there were also guitar players .. and I mean " GUITAR PLAYERS "
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    (Original post by Ergo)
    I use three fingers for strumming too. Four when I wanna have some loud rock n roll
    Me too but I use picks when there are faster strummings though, cuz my fingernails tend to 'chip away' XD
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    (Original post by AbzWayne)
    Get a thumb pick.
    Great wee gadget, gives you the best of both worlds.

    I did try to learn the guitar a long time ago, couldnt get past a few wee easy riffs and basic chords.
    But I had so much fun practising the finger picking over and over...

    Also, you may want to just grow your thumb nail a little longer than normal and use that, just don't go down the route of painting it black to toughen it up !!!
    Do you use finger picks though? I find them harder to use, prefer to use fingers. But sometimes fingers are not loud enough..
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    I would advise you to practice with both.

    I use both when playing acoustic (depending on the song) and electric (fingerpicking on electric ist kvlt)
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    I do both, because limiting yourself is lame.
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    (Original post by concubine)
    I do both, because limiting yourself is lame.
    Agreed, I like to be able to alternate between the two and to benefit from doing so. I think it is worth making the point that using a plectrum on a steel stringed acoustic guitar does not inherently sound poor by any means, but it certainly will if you do so on a classical.
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    Use a plectrum most of the time, thin for acoustic, whereas I use a thicker one for my electric. However, learning to fingerpick is invaluable.
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    Fingers.

    But then, I play a lot of finger-picky stuff. The tone is a lot nicer when strumming with fingers anyway. I'd only use a plec for volume/playing to a crowd.

    Just learn to fingerpick. It's far more challenging and fun to play things that have a proper melody than just strumming stuff all the time.
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    Having tried both, I've found that neither finger or plectrum style is an easy option once you really get into them, both need a lot of hard work. I think dedication is the word I'm looking for!
    I'm a plectrist, because I love the sound of a plectrum on wire and wood.
    For the plectrum, for a start think Django Reinhardt, Tony Rice, Eddie Lang, Al DiMeola, Clarence White, and many more.
    There's a lot more to plectrum guitar than easy strumming as you'll see if you have look at these players on YouTube.
 
 
 
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