Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Final question as I come to a finish with my C1 revision, sorry for my persistence with it.

    Could any mortal tell me what on earth this rubbish means:

    y = f(x) ± g(x) then dy/dx = f'(x) ± g'(x)

    None of this explicated in the C1 textbook, just sticks it on at the summary page of Chapter 7. From the looks of it, it involves two functions that are differentiated simultaneously, but could anyone put it into context/give an example or attempt to explain it? Not sure of how and when I'd use it, just generally confused.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by snow leopard)
    Final question as I come to a finish with my C1 revision, sorry for my persistence with it.

    Could any mortal tell me what on earth this rubbish means:

    y = f(x) ± g(x) then dy/dx = f'(x) ± g'(x)

    None of this explicated in the C1 textbook, just sticks it on at the summary page of Chapter 7. From the looks of it, it involves two functions that are differentiated simultaneously, but could anyone put it into context/give an example or attempt to explain it? Not sure of how and when I'd use it, just generally confused.
    If Y equals function 1 + function 2, the derivative of Y equals the derivative of function 1 + the derivative of function 2. The same goes for subtracting. Treat each part separately.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Do you know what \pm means?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    When you differentiate stuff added together you treat each bit separately
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    It means that if you have two different functions and you want to differentiate them, you have to differentiate each different functions separately.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    It just means that the differential of y = f(x) ± g(x) can be written as y = f'(x) ± g'(x), in some exams they will write an equation starting with f'(x) rather than f(x) to show that it has already been differentiated, so you will generally need to integrate it.


    I think....
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ArsLongaVitaBrevis)
    If Y equals function 1 + function 2, the derivative of Y equals the derivative of function 1 + the derivative of function 2. The same goes for subtracting. Treat each part separately.
    Thank you; to the point. Just needed to double check my thoughts with a worded equivalent of the summary giberrish. Thanks again.

    (Original post by Pheylan)
    Do you know what \pm means?
    Yup.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by snow leopard)
    Thank you; to the point. Just needed to double check my thoughts with a worded equivalent of the summary giberrish. Thanks again.



    Yup.
    You're welcome. Are you in year 12?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ArsLongaVitaBrevis)
    You're welcome. Are you in year 12?
    Indeed, I am Are you?

    Taking units C1 C2 S1 next month ~
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by snow leopard)
    Indeed, I am Are you?

    Taking units C1 C2 S1 next month ~
    Lucky, I'm in year 11 and can't wait to start doing maths in school. Good luck by the way, I assume you're taking A Level maths over 2 years? These are your first modules right?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ArsLongaVitaBrevis)
    Lucky, I'm in year 11 and can't wait to start doing maths in school. Good luck by the way, I assume you're taking A Level maths over 2 years? These are your first modules right?
    From your explanation of the calculus point and the fact your only in year 11, you must be really smart ~

    Aren't you doing maths in school right now? I fully recommend a level maths to you though, although I'd like to briefly warn from experience to keep an eye on whether you'll get the modules completed as in my school a lot of classes are in a mess with C2.

    Will definitely be taking Maths to A2 (2 years). C1 C2 S1 are my first, and I really hate S1 it's horrible, statistics are just boring gah, I wish I self-taught myself D1 and entered for that instead of S1.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by snow leopard)
    From your explanation of the calculus point and the fact your only in year 11, you must be really smart ~

    Aren't you doing maths in school right now? I fully recommend a level maths to you though, although I'd like to briefly warn from experience to keep an eye on whether you'll get the modules completed as in my school a lot of classes are in a mess with C2.

    Will definitely be taking Maths to A2 (2 years). C1 C2 S1 are my first, and I really hate S1 it's horrible, statistics are just boring gah, I wish I self-taught myself D1 and entered for that instead of S1.
    Does that mean that your school does all three exams at once in May and no Maths modules in January? Yikes!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by snow leopard)
    From your explanation of the calculus point and the fact your only in year 11, you must be really smart ~

    Aren't you doing maths in school right now? I fully recommend a level maths to you though, although I'd like to briefly warn from experience to keep an eye on whether you'll get the modules completed as in my school a lot of classes are in a mess with C2.

    Will definitely be taking Maths to A2 (2 years). C1 C2 S1 are my first, and I really hate S1 it's horrible, statistics are just boring gah, I wish I self-taught myself D1 and entered for that instead of S1.
    Thanks, although C1 calculus is nothing complicated really - just wait until partial fractions and integration by substitution in C3 and C4, as well as integrating trig functions. I am doing GCSE 'maths', but I wouldn't call it maths as such. Next year I will be taking accelerated A-Level Maths, and Further Maths as well.
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ArsLongaVitaBrevis)
    Thanks, although C1 calculus is nothing complicated really - just wait until partial fractions and integration by substitution in C3 and C4, as well as integrating trig functions. I am doing GCSE 'maths', but I wouldn't call it maths as such. Next year I will be taking accelerated A-Level Maths, and Further Maths as well.
    I wouldnt be that excited about C3 and C4. Integration by parts and partial fractions are just very time consuming.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ArsLongaVitaBrevis)
    Thanks, although C1 calculus is nothing complicated really - just wait until partial fractions and integration by substitution in C3 and C4, as well as integrating trig functions. I am doing GCSE 'maths', but I wouldn't call it maths as such. Next year I will be taking accelerated A-Level Maths, and Further Maths as well.
    Haha the way you shrug off C1 as if its baby doings XD

    Agreed; GCSE maths is brainless and unworthy, you could crash-course the whole thing two days prior the exam, it does nothing for the transition to A level.

    If you're really passionate and inspired by maths I'd suggest a third maths a level, additional further maths also known as 'unchosen modules', such as the D2 or M3 and etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by snow leopard)
    Haha the way you shrug off C1 as if its baby doings XD

    Agreed; GCSE maths is brainless and unworthy, you could crash-course the whole thing two days prior the exam, it does nothing for the transition to A level.

    If you're really passionate and inspired by maths I'd suggest a third maths a level, additional further maths also known as 'unchosen modules', such as the D2 or M3 and etc.
    In terms of mathematical complexity, it is.
    I'm glad you agree.
    I hate decision maths.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by limetang)
    I wouldnt be that excited about C3 and C4. Integration by parts and partial fractions are just very time consuming.
    I don't get particularly challenged or excited by them, but if the OP had a little trouble getting their head around the rules of differentiation they may find the above hard at first sight. Now FP1-3 - that's exciting alright.
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ArsLongaVitaBrevis)
    I don't get particularly challenged or excited by them, but if the OP had a little trouble getting their head around the rules of differentiation they may find the above hard at first sight. Now FP1-3 - that's exciting alright.
    True. I mean I wish I'd done further, but I was in an awful class for GCSE maths and only ended up with a B. As opposed to now where I'm getting A*'s. So I wasnt allowed to do it at the start of Y12.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ArsLongaVitaBrevis)
    In terms of mathematical complexity, it is.
    I'm glad you agree.
    I hate decision maths.
    Yes, but you can't hate it as much as statistics. Cannot wait until S1 is over, it's so so boring.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ArsLongaVitaBrevis)
    I don't get particularly challenged or excited by them, but if the OP had a little trouble getting their head around the rules of differentiation they may find the above hard at first sight. Now FP1-3 - that's exciting alright.
    Wasn't really having trouble, just wanted to make sure 100% of its meaning as my class just scraped the surface on chapter 7, can never be careless in maths for the slightest of things.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?
Useful resources

Make your revision easier

Maths

Maths Forum posting guidelines

Not sure where to post? Read the updated guidelines here

Equations

How to use LaTex

Writing equations the easy way

Student revising

Study habits of A* students

Top tips from students who have already aced their exams

Study Planner

Create your own Study Planner

Never miss a deadline again

Polling station sign

Thinking about a maths degree?

Chat with other maths applicants

Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.