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    (Original post by a moist feeling)
    The UKCAT is mostly luck based anyway, with loads of prep I got 667.5 and with a lot less prep I got 767.5
    No offense but this is a flawed argument. If your score improved second time round with less prep, this may be because you had taken it the year before and therefore knew what to expect. The extra year also allowed you to make some techniques sink in. So you are comparing the incomparable.
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    Of course. I know someone 530 first time round, no preparation, 775 second time round. Ridiculous isn't it
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    Yes it can! I got 675 first time, then 765 the next. With a lot of hard work that is.
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    With very little practice, I got 632.5 the first time; with about a month of practice and doing the whole of 600 UKCAT Questions, ended up with 642.5 :ashamed2:

    I don't know whether that says something about the test, or about me :emo:


    :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by ringham33170)
    First attempt at medicine I got about 660/665 (can't remember exactly).....second time around I got 832.5...

    So yea....you can change it :P
    So impressed I repped you.

    What did you do to improve your score?
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    (Original post by No Future)
    So impressed I repped you.

    What did you do to improve your score?
    Just did the 2 practice tests available on the ukcat site. Did them a couple times each and identified the patterns and types of ways to handle the questions....that's it all to be honest.
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    Generally it is difficult to estimate the real impact of preparation versus luck.
    We know from this forum that some people have really hard questions a the exam and others have easier questions. Most get a good mix. So that will inevitably influence the outcome.

    Secondly, whether preparation or not makes a difference, I am struggling to see how it could make things worse. So, anyone who says that preparation is pointless has no real argument. Why take a chance? You might as well do as much preparation as you can afford or have time for.

    Thirdly, the argument "I didn't do any preparation and still got a good score" does not wash. If you had prepared more you would likely have had an even better score with more options for med schools open to you.

    Fourthly, there are other factors influencing the outcome including your nerves on the day. On one hand a retaker could be less nervous because they know what to expect, on the other hand they could be more nervous because it may well be their final chance. Everyone reacts in different ways.

    At the end of the day, anyone who didn't get the score they wanted would regret not having done more preparation. So you might as well go for it and give yourself the best chances.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Haha, as if!
    Was failing QR, getting less than half marks, then I got 850 so UKCAT is just preparation and unpredictability.
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    (Original post by Tutankhamark)
    Yes it can! I got 675 first time, then 765 the next. With a lot of hard work that is.
    That's 675 with the numbers jumbled round lol.
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    It can be improved. I sat the test three times and every year my score improved.
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    (Original post by jam277)
    That's 675 with the numbers jumbled round lol.
    I know what a coincidence hehe
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    (Original post by telephone)
    But can you expect a 660 to become nearly 700?
    Someone on TSR got 605 in 2009, but 700 in 2010.
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    Of course you can, the ukcat isn't inherently difficult, it's largely the timing that trips people up. With practice you can improve your score.

    I got 670 the first time i did it with what i thought was a good amount of preparation. The second time i worked a lot harder and got 760. I used exactly the same books but i was just a lot more organised with my prep.

    Start early, a good few weeks before the test, so that you're really familiarised with the style of questions etc. And do the mock tests, they're great practice and really useful. And trying some questions online wouldn't hurt either.
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    (Original post by ringham33170)
    First attempt at medicine I got about 660/665 (can't remember exactly).....second time around I got 832.5...

    So yea....you can change it :P
    Wow...WHAT DID YOU DO THE SECOND TIME AROUND ?
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    It's just a test. If you improve your technique and do practice tests, you can improve your score.

    But you don't really need an amazing score, I got 3 interviews with a 695.
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    YOU DO NOT KNOW WHICH QUESTIONS YOU WILL GET ON THE DAY

    So how could it be taught? You don't know if you'll get more easy questions or longer, harder ones. Some people repeating will undoubtedly get easier questions, some might try again and see only a marginal improvement (i.e. the poster near the top of this page who improved by about 10 points, probably though being more familiar with the test)

    You can improve, but not drastically without a lot of luck in the question allocation. The exception is probably with quantitative reasoning, I'd say.
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    (Original post by searchingshadow)
    UKCAT is kind of random, depends on the day too; but you can definatly improve it. Just buy the #600 UKCAT question book, and you'll easily get above 700.
    I did alot of practice (Lots of free online questions, the pearson practice tests, completed the whole of 600Q book plus subscribed to medify and did all of their questions!) and I still only got a score of 640. In my practice tests I was averaging well over 700 so I really think there is a luck element. I was convinced that I was going to do well in the UKCAT because I had prepared so much but sometimes it doesn't work out like that I'm not trying to dishearten anyone but practicing doesn't guarantee a good result. Good luck next time
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    I managed to improve mine by about 40 or say, with lots of prep both times though, so I suppose so.
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    I got 558 first time round with 4 weeks revision...but I guess I didnt actually study properly so I was doing an hour there and 10 minutes there. PLus, to be honest am not that good at QR section. I think my low UKCAT was a big blow to my whole application so yeah am applying again but this time am going to look at where i went wrong and why and plan to study for it properly. I want to get more than 680 but I dont know if I will. Hopefully I get my timing right and all goes to plan.

    just a quick question: is it better to start doing easier or harder questions (600q book) first? when should you start timing yourself while practicing the questions, after how many practice questions
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    (Original post by Ama2007)
    I got 558 first time round with 4 weeks revision...but I guess I didnt actually study properly so I was doing an hour there and 10 minutes there. PLus, to be honest am not that good at QR section. I think my low UKCAT was a big blow to my whole application so yeah am applying again but this time am going to look at where i went wrong and why and plan to study for it properly. I want to get more than 680 but I dont know if I will. Hopefully I get my timing right and all goes to plan.
    I think you're better off preparing for the QR section in the long-term, in that case i.e. practice your GCSE-level maths until your feeling much more confident answering simple arithmetic quickly off the top of your head. Practice using a simple calculator, not a scientific one, as that reflects the test more accurately. Better yet, use the simple calculator on Windows with your mouse and keyboard to reflect test conditions. A good resource is doing practice GCSE papers, Bitesize quizzes, general online cognitive aptitude tests and so forth.

    For the other sections, 2 weeks solid revision would probably be more beneficial. I find that getting myself into the frame of mind for the UKCAT is important, rather than just knowing how to do it over a long period of time. If you can get your brain actively thinking like it should for the two weeks prior to the test, you should find it easier. Practising under pressured time-conditions also helps

    just a quick question: is it better to start doing easier or harder questions (600q book) first? when should you start timing yourself while practicing the questions, after how many practice questions
    I'd do the practice questions from easy-to-hard (and use other resources, too!). The UKCAT 600Q book gives you a good guide as to how long you should spend on each question, and how many questions you should have completed after set periods of time (i.e. 5 mins, 10 mins...)

    Then when you're comfortable, and a day or two before the exam, go through the mocks in the 600Q book in the proper format and timing.
 
 
 
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