Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    for what it's worth, I have a friend who chose Goldsmiths over Cardiff to study English after acheiving A*AA. Everytime I see her she's unable to tell me how satisfied she is with the teaching/course and what a wonderful experience she's having living in London.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    As in, she isn't satisfied with the course but is with London?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cloudofdestiny)
    As in, she isn't satisfied with the course but is with London?
    sorry for the vagueness, she's absolutely satisfied- so much so she's unable to express her satisfaction in words.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Anything specifically she's loved about the course/Goldsmiths/its students/London?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I couldn't go into specifics, but I'd be confident in her judgement with re: to the course's credibility.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    To be quite honest, UEA is a very respectable university and any literature course from there is not to be sniffed at...
    I am biased of course as I am hopefully going there in September to do American Lit and Creative writing - but if you have doubts then maybe it's not the one for you. I love the sound of the course because of the year abroad where I've heard you can spend part of the year doing drama. Also UEA gives you the option to do modules from different courses so (within reason) you can try your hand at anything.
    Plus, though I know league tables aren't everything, in 2011 UEA ranked consistently in the top 30 in the country while Goldsmith's didn't.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/League_...h_universities

    It would be silly to base your uni choice on a league table obviously but I wouldn't worry about it's reputation as it's very well respected with a high student satisfaction rating.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I do American Literature as part of my course and it is not any less academic than the English Literature part, that's for sure!

    If you do apply for the course they might ask for another PS with American Lit in it. I got in for that course last year - but I did mention American AND English Literature in my PS so just be careful about that and don't assume you'll get in just because you meet the grades.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    If I wanted to do some related postgraduate study,
    do you think I would be considered alongside other straight English students?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jez RR)
    The American Studies school is expanding, which is probably why this has flagged up with a relatively low entry requirement. UEA has the best Creative Writing course in the country, and it's part of the School of Literature. Many workshops going on, top authors coming in to give talks and so on. There are a lot of people who would give their right arm to get in here, just to be in the environment.

    America has produced one or two good writers over the years, you know
    I have the sudden urge to get back to RS revision...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cloudofdestiny)
    If I wanted to do some related postgraduate study,
    do you think I would be considered alongside other straight English students?
    There are far too many other variables for anyone to answer that question properly.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by polka_dott)
    I do American Literature as part of my course and it is not any less academic than the English Literature part, that's for sure!
    Did you find the first year weighted towards American history and culture?
    Or is it quite an even balance?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cloudofdestiny)
    Did you find the first year weighted towards American history and culture?
    Or is it quite an even balance?
    My course is in my signature, and in my first and second year at least, it's two thirds American classes and one third English.
    In the first year, because the classes are across two Schools with their own requirements, you don't get much choice. (A bit true for the second year as well)
    The American modules were aimed at history and culture, but literature too - and you have completely free choice in your essays, so you can write from a pure literary standpoint.

    But I enjoy all my modules, the seminars are great.

    You need to bear in mind how expensive the year abroad really is.
    They emphasise the 'half UEA tutition fees' aspect, but you'll need to prove to the college that you have £9000+ for your studies. There are so many extra costs.

    Medical checks: £180
    Visa cost: £350
    Flights: £500 (£700 west coast)
    Meal Plan: £1500
    'Activity Fee': £200

    etc...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fran Katzenjammer)
    My course is in my signature, and in my first and second year at least, it's two thirds American classes and one third English.
    Where is your signature, sorry?
    Are you taking American and English literature?
    In which case, I had thought in the second year it was possible
    to create a 50:50 split of English and American literature modules,
    at least the course program online made it look so?

    Yeah, I've been doing some research into the costs related to the year abroad,
    and is it really true that I'll end up spending $10,000+
    merely on accommodation?

    Which American university are you studying at next year,
    and what led you to choose it? When abroad, do they push you towards
    American studies related modules, or do you get the opportunity to specialise
    in certain aspects of English/English literature?

    Do you even have access to the lists of what's available, subject-wise,
    when choosing the university for your year abroad?

    Thanks
    I hope I didn't ask too many questions!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cloudofdestiny)
    Where is your signature, sorry?
    Are you taking American and English literature?
    In which case, I had thought in the second year it was possible
    to create a 50:50 split of English and American literature modules,
    at least the course program online made it look so?

    Yeah, I've been doing some research into the costs related to the year abroad,
    and is it really true that I'll end up spending $10,000+
    merely on accommodation?

    Which American university are you studying at next year,
    and what led you to choose it? When abroad, do they push you towards
    American studies related modules, or do you get the opportunity to specialise
    in certain aspects of English/English literature?

    Do you even have access to the lists of what's available, subject-wise,
    when choosing the university for your year abroad?

    Thanks
    I hope I didn't ask too many questions!
    Not at all! I'm doing American and English Literature, so I'm in the School of American Studies. I have some brilliant tutors.

    Nope, the second year is only one third English. At least that's how it is for me.
    Aside from your tuition fees, accommodation prices and costs of food plans etc are down to the university.
    I'm going to Clark U in Worscester, MA. There, a double room is $4000 for the year - which is cheaper than UEA. A single room is $6200 for the year. But obviously this is something you'll have to research, depending on where you wanna go.

    You put down 5 choices for America, and I think I only got my 4th choice. (They say most people get 1st and 2nd, but whatever) I got Framingham State, also in MA. I decided I didn't want to go there, and they had some places left over which people hadn't chosen yet. So I swapped to Clark. But I think you'll have a brilliant time wherever you go. Academically, the year abroad marks don't count towards your degree - but in February of the YA, you have to submit a Dissertation abstract/proposal. You write the dissertation before Christmas in your 4th year. On my degree, I can choose to write an English Lit dissertation.

    50% of your classes have to be in your chosen field - ie American history/music/literature. But the other 50% is free choice. (So long as it's academic)
    Clark doesn't have an American Studies department, so I just have to take 50% Lit-in-general classes.

    Clark's class list was in its Academic Catalog. (Yeah they spell it Catalog)
    But the actual amount of classes on offer for the Fall was much smaller. I found it on the page of the 'Registrar's Office'. You have to look in the administrationy places.

    Hope this helps!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fran Katzenjammer)
    Not at all! I'm doing American and English Literature, so I'm in the School of American Studies. I have some brilliant tutors.
    Thankyou for giving me such a detailed response!
    All of that info about finance and module choice puts my mind at rest
    (to an extent!)

    So was American and English Literature your first choice?
    I've had my heart set on straight English for so long,
    (though whatever my English course I'd have been inclined to choose
    some modules focusing on American Literature).

    This UEA course seemed to offer a good balance of both
    but you're saying it's dominated by American topics?
    Will I be out of place on the course if I'm as interested in the English Literature
    parts as the American? Or possibly even more interested?

    Sorry I'm kinda panicky at the moment!
    Because it's between choosing a university less suited for an English degree
    but that is offering me a course close to my interests (Goldsmiths),
    or East Anglia, which seems an ideal place for this field of study
    yet only has a course slightly less suited to me (though still obviously of great interest).

    It worries me that that although I'm fond of American Literature,
    I'm not sure how well I'd deal with the English Literature being sidelined
    in favour of stuff about American culture/ideologies etc!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cloudofdestiny)
    Thankyou for giving me such a detailed response!
    All of that info about finance and module choice puts my mind at rest
    (to an extent!)

    So was American and English Literature your first choice?
    I've had my heart set on straight English for so long,
    (though whatever my English course I'd have been inclined to choose
    some modules focusing on American Literature).
    I originally put down English and American Literature, and got my conditional offer. However, I was always interested in the Am&Eng course and really wanted to do the year abroad - my only reservation was the school of American Studies - and everyone who's been on TSR or read the Mail knows to fear that word!
    But I e-mailed UEA admissions before results day and asked to change to my current course, as I thought - what the hell.

    Now I'm here it seems quite a foolish thought, my American Literature/Studies modules are just as academically rigorous as the English Lit modules, and sometimes harder. It also seems insulting to the terrifically clever tutors.

    I think I chose the American Lit combined course partly so I'd get in. I was predicted AAA but I didn't think I'd get that. (And, in fact, I didn't)
    I think it's your decision whether you want that slant. The first year is when you get the more general American Studies classes, but frankly it was more interesting than the English Lit classes.

    In the second year - it's all literature, you know?
    This semester I have Early 20th Century American Novel, Contemporary American Fiction, and 19th Century Writing (Mainly English novels, but some French and one Henry James). I'm reading and talking about books across the board.
    And just because I'm only taking one straight 'English' class doesn't mean it feels sidelined. When you're in a seminar, no one knows what degree you're taking. You don't know what degrees they're taking. You all chose that seminar, you're all interested in it, and for those 2 hours, you're all dedicated to that book, that discussion.

    It feels like a Literature degree - because it is one. These books are all written in English!

    And from a personal point of view, I would rather be a student in Norwich than in London. UEA has a great big campus with beautiful surroundings, while town is 10 minutes away by bus. (Which come every 5-15 minutes, and run to 4am)
    Norwich is big town/small city and has shops, pubs, clubs... it's great.
    Now we're off campus, it only takes 10 minutes to walk in.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fran Katzenjammer)
    I originally put down English and American Literature, and got my conditional offer.
    Yes! I have those worries now!
    Do you think the 'American Studies' factor would negatively impact chances of
    say, graduate employment or postgraduate study?
    Or would it just be seen as a specialised English/Literature course?

    And (this is going to sound really shallow!) but are the other people on the
    course all I LOVE AMERICA and stuff, like do you feel like the American aspect of it
    will define you and those around you after the degree?
    + also is it irritating in the first year mixing predominately with people
    who are taking related American Studies courses, because I guess right now
    I like the idea of being immersed in Literature students..

    Hm I think it's just the first year that's putting me off!
    But as you said, the American modules are likely to prove more interesting.
    What kind of stuff did you cover?
    How did it progress through the terms/semesters?

    Yeah, so is it easy to access Norwich then?
    Because I felt kind of put off that me and my mum were circling it
    for like half an hour before actually getting into the city centre!
    Do the buses stop everywhere?

    So are students pro-active when it comes to going into Norwich,
    because I might find it frustrating if EVERYTHING happened on campus!

    Half of these questions might sound really stupid,
    but I'm trying to take advantage of some insider knowledge
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cloudofdestiny)
    Yes! I have those worries now!
    Do you think the 'American Studies' factor would negatively impact chances of
    say, graduate employment or postgraduate study?
    Or would it just be seen as a specialised English/Literature course?

    And (this is going to sound really shallow!) but are the other people on the
    course all I LOVE AMERICA and stuff, like do you feel like the American aspect of it
    will define you and those around you after the degree?
    + also is it irritating in the first year mixing predominately with people
    who are taking related American Studies courses, because I guess right now
    I like the idea of being immersed in Literature students..

    Hm I think it's just the first year that's putting me off!
    But as you said, the American modules are likely to prove more interesting.
    What kind of stuff did you cover?
    How did it progress through the terms/semesters?

    Yeah, so is it easy to access Norwich then?
    Because I felt kind of put off that me and my mum were circling it
    for like half an hour before actually getting into the city centre!
    Do the buses stop everywhere?

    So are students pro-active when it comes to going into Norwich,
    because I might find it frustrating if EVERYTHING happened on campus!

    Half of these questions might sound really stupid,
    but I'm trying to take advantage of some insider knowledge
    I'm not sure about employers, but I think attitudes to Humanities degrees are much the same. So long as it's a 2:1, and depending on how you use your year abroad, you might look like more impressive than someone who's never lived/worked abroad.

    Most classes, to be honest, are hardly "I LOVE AMERICA" - not when you look at treatment of the land, or treatment of Native Americans, or hypocritical policy. But you're supposed to be critical of whatever you're studying, really...
    The Arts in general... it's so interdisciplinary, whatever School you're in everyone has their own strengths and interests. Be it Literature, or History, or Politics...

    It's so fantastically broad.

    In the first year.... I'm struggling to remember what we did!
    I had one class which focused on early diarists, writers, founding fathers etc. That was interesting, the early literature, and fundamental ideologies. We read the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.
    My first English class was 'Literature in History I' which featured Chaucer and Yeats and made me go to sleep.
    I had a 'Study Skills' module in AMS which introduced essay writing, research skills, and the essay was utterly free. You could write about music, film, literature, aaaanything. That was when I wrote about Dr Strangelove. Nice first year class. She kinda let the class take the seminar in its own direction.

    The bus system is really good. Definitely get the yearly pass, which was £180 last time I checked. It's worth it.
    There's a bus stop right next to the campus, and there's a stop in the middle of the high street. Takes 10 minutes. The same route goes to the station, too. Allow 30+ minutes if you're catching a train, but it takes about 20.
    I feel very connected to the city while I'm there. Now we have a house, I'm not on campus that much, outside of seminars.

    I *love* Norwich, it suits me, because there's stuff to do - I particularly like the 3 cinemas and ton of shops - but it's also really nicely laid out and charming to walk through, particularly the winding old streets and shops near the north-easterly corner.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    applied to the course! THANKS FOR YOUR HELP
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cloudofdestiny)
    applied to the course! THANKS FOR YOUR HELP
    Glad I could be of assistance!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: April 26, 2011
Poll
Do you want your parents to be with you when you collect your A-level results?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.