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    well, i didnt know where to put this exactly but i thought it was about every day life and time management.

    ok im at university final year, i have not studied at all through out the past two semesters and im hoping to get v high marks for the exams hopefully a 1st.
    considering this, i dont know how to plan my revision (well actually learning). i need a great plan which i can use over the next 5 weeks before my exams.
    i have 7 exams one module each. 2 of the modules overlap greatly as they're both about banking and have a lot of overlapping concepts. also, theres 2 others both on finance. one is on tourism, airport management. one is marketing, one is Human resources.

    how would you go about revising for 7 different topics. i was considering doing 4 topics a day and spend 12 hours a day studying but i think this may be ineffective and unrealistic.

    what are your thoughts please?
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    Redbull.
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    (Original post by MR-Sanshou)
    well, i didnt know where to put this exactly but i thought it was about every day life and time management.

    ok im at university final year, i have not studied at all through out the past two semesters and im hoping to get v high marks for the exams hopefully a 1st.
    considering this, i dont know how to plan my revision (well actually learning). i need a great plan which i can use over the next 5 weeks before my exams.
    i have 7 exams one module each. 2 of the modules overlap greatly as they're both about banking and have a lot of overlapping concepts. also, theres 2 others both on finance. one is on tourism, airport management. one is marketing, one is Human resources.

    how would you go about revising for 7 different topics. i was considering doing 4 topics a day and spend 12 hours a day studying but i think this may be ineffective and unrealistic.

    what are your thoughts please?
    First: Hit up all the past exam papers you can find. List the topics by frequency they appear. Take the most frequently appearing topics and revise those (if the exam asks to answer three questions, then prepare more, make sure you have an 'oh ****' topic).

    Work like mental, basically. You're not going to be able to work 12 hours a day or do 4 topics a day in any depth; focus on a single topic at a time and go deep into it - for a first, you'll need that depth of knowledge.

    Good luck.
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    Firstly, you need to look at module past exam papers and work out which topics in each module you need to revise i.e. if the exam has 6 questions and you have covered 12 topics, chances are the topics that came up last year won't be this year so take them out and revise maybe 4 of the topics that are left. This is what I do and it has always worked but obviously it depends whether your exams follow a similar structure.
    Secondly, work out how many hours a day you are free to work - doing 12 hours is near impossible for solid revision that you will actually learn and remember. I'd suggest 2-3 hours at a time with 45 minutes break between. During this, leave the place you are revising - maybe go for a walk, listen to music.
    Also, I find it easier and simpler to focus on one topic at a time i.e. start off with lecture notes, then suggested reading and then advanced reading (given by some lecturers) if you don't have this then it might be worth asking for the material you should be turning to for revison, unless you already have books etc.
    Finally, make you sure you eat and sleep well during these weeks so you feel refreshed and ready to get on with it all. Redbull does wonders to my concentration, so stock up and good luck
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    (Original post by chidona)
    First: Hit up all the past exam papers you can find. List the topics by frequency they appear. Take the most frequently appearing topics and revise those (if the exam asks to answer three questions, then prepare more, make sure you have an 'oh ****' topic).

    Work like mental, basically. You're not going to be able to work 12 hours a day or do 4 topics a day in any depth; focus on a single topic at a time and go deep into it - for a first, you'll need that depth of knowledge.

    Good luck.
    thank you, but when you say focus on a single topic 'at a time', are you saying i should just study one topic per day as opposed to four?
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    (Original post by DeepStar)
    Firstly, you need to look at module past exam papers and work out which topics in each module you need to revise i.e. if the exam has 6 questions and you have covered 12 topics, chances are the topics that came up last year won't be this year so take them out and revise maybe 4 of the topics that are left. This is what I do and it has always worked but obviously it depends whether your exams follow a similar structure.
    Secondly, work out how many hours a day you are free to work - doing 12 hours is near impossible for solid revision that you will actually learn and remember. I'd suggest 2-3 hours at a time with 45 minutes break between. During this, leave the place you are revising - maybe go for a walk, listen to music.
    Also, I find it easier and simpler to focus on one topic at a time i.e. start off with lecture notes, then suggested reading and then advanced reading (given by some lecturers) if you don't have this then it might be worth asking for the material you should be turning to for revison, unless you already have books etc.
    Finally, make you sure you eat and sleep well during these weeks so you feel refreshed and ready to get on with it all. Redbull does wonders to my concentration, so stock up and good luck
    thank you! but also like the above post, what do you guys mean by one topic at a time? are you saying one topic a day? if thats the case i wont have time to cover all topics for all 7 modules in just under 5 weeks. how would you alternate so if there are 7 topic for one module and all 7 are coming up in the exam are you suggesting 1 topic a day and cover all those 7 topics for just that module in the first week and so on...thats crazy i wont remember that
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    7 exams, 7 days a week, take a fixed time slot each day, mine is 12-8, you can adjust accordingly to your sleep pattern, and work.
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    (Original post by MR-Sanshou)
    thank you! but also like the above post, what do you guys mean by one topic at a time? are you saying one topic a day? if thats the case i wont have time to cover all topics for all 7 modules in just under 5 weeks. how would you alternate so if there are 7 topic for one module and all 7 are coming up in the exam are you suggesting 1 topic a day and cover all those 7 topics for just that module in the first week and so on...thats crazy i wont remember that

    I mean, start a topic and spend as much time as you need to cover all the material and until you feel confident that you could do the exam on the topic before moving on to another topic.
    In my experience, I have found this to be a better approach than doing several bits of several topics because then all the information is in order and you are less likely to miss something in a topic this way.
    It's just an idea, if you feel you would be better of dedicating half your day to one topic, then the other half doing a different topic, then that is your judgement call, depending on how much you feel you to need to cover in each module.
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    (Original post by MR-Sanshou)
    thank you, but when you say focus on a single topic 'at a time', are you saying i should just study one topic per day as opposed to four?
    Aye, it's just that you're unlikely to get the depth of knowledge if you keep going between topics. It's up to you, although I can tell you at third year I'm spending an entire week on certain topics to get the depth of knowledge I need for the exam.
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    (Original post by Crazy Paving)
    7 exams, 7 days a week, take a fixed time slot each day, mine is 12-8, you can adjust accordingly to your sleep pattern, and work.
    8 hours is a lot!
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    8 hours is a lot!
    I know, but it needs to be done when you've done nothing all year. :sigh: I am trying to take a 5 min break every 2 hours or so.
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    (Original post by Crazy Paving)
    I know, but it needs to be done when you've done nothing all year. :sigh: I am trying to take a 5 min break every 2 hours or so.
    5 minutes is nothing! What can you do in 5 minutes? :zomg:

    And doesn't your mind start wandering after ~45 minutes of work?
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    5 minutes is nothing! What can you do in 5 minutes? :zomg:

    And doesn't your mind start wandering after ~45 minutes of work?
    Just grab some food/drink quickly, it's normally longer anyway.

    Nah, once I'm focused, I'm focused. :yep:
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    (Original post by Crazy Paving)
    Just grab some food/drink quickly, it's normally longer anyway.

    Nah, once I'm focused, I'm focused. :yep:
    Beast. The internet has trampled on my attention span. :facepalm2:
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    (Original post by Crazy Paving)
    I know, but it needs to be done when you've done nothing all year. :sigh: I am trying to take a 5 min break every 2 hours or so.
    That's mental, I'd burn out really quickly.
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    (Original post by DeepStar)
    I mean, start a topic and spend as much time as you need to cover all the material and until you feel confident that you could do the exam on the topic before moving on to another topic.
    In my experience, I have found this to be a better approach than doing several bits of several topics because then all the information is in order and you are less likely to miss something in a topic this way.
    It's just an idea, if you feel you would be better of dedicating half your day to one topic, then the other half doing a different topic, then that is your judgement call, depending on how much you feel you to need to cover in each module.
    I think i get what you mean but it will be detrimental let me use an example
    i have one module called human resources it has 10 topics, the exam paper this year will have questions on each of the 10 topics. your saying take however long to finish a topic before moving on to the next one. lets say on average it takes me 3 days to cover one topic, to do 10 that would be 3x10=30 days to complete 10 topics for just one module(human resources) but i have 6 other modules to do!! and about 35 days in total. so this plan wouldnt work!...
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    (Original post by chidona)
    Aye, it's just that you're unlikely to get the depth of knowledge if you keep going between topics. It's up to you, although I can tell you at third year I'm spending an entire week on certain topics to get the depth of knowledge I need for the exam.
    I think i get what you mean but it will be detrimental let me use an example
    i have one module called human resources it has 10 topics, the exam paper this year will have questions on each of the 10 topics. your saying take however long to finish a topic before moving on to the next one. lets say on average it takes me 3 days to cover one topic, to do 10 that would be 3x10=30 days to complete 10 topics for just one module(human resources) but i have 6 other modules to do!! and about 35 days in total. so this plan wouldnt work!...
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    www.getrevising.co.uk a timetable calculator I dnt know if it would help but there you go :P
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    (Original post by MR-Sanshou)
    I think i get what you mean but it will be detrimental let me use an example
    i have one module called human resources it has 10 topics, the exam paper this year will have questions on each of the 10 topics. your saying take however long to finish a topic before moving on to the next one. lets say on average it takes me 3 days to cover one topic, to do 10 that would be 3x10=30 days to complete 10 topics for just one module(human resources) but i have 6 other modules to do!! and about 35 days in total. so this plan wouldnt work!...
    Ok, maybe not if there is going to be a question on each topic! Obviously, with mine, we have 12 topics and 6 questions so the method works fine.

    If you need to that for every module then I suggest you work out how much time you have, divide that between the modules and then divide again between the topics (assuming you need to revise them all to the same extent).
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    (Original post by Crazy Paving)
    7 exams, 7 days a week, take a fixed time slot each day, mine is 12-8, you can adjust accordingly to your sleep pattern, and work.
    thats how i m studying but it is so unproductive, really I have 2 weeks left and 5 exams...done 3 and 2 to go but the thing is my aim is a first and has always been that...I really want it badly...but dunno how realistic it is...i have always studied well in advance like 8 weeks before and been so confident.



    but now I keep getting distracted!!!!!!!!
 
 
 
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