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Autistic brother is driving me crazy! watch

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    (Original post by kerily)
    I would explain to him why what he's doing is wrong, and explain that he needs to stop doing it. Autistic people often bond more readily with animals than with humans (I'm closer to my dogs than I am to anyone I know) and there is also a very good chance that while this behaviour appalls you, he doesn't realise it's wrong. Autistic people don't understand that their actions affect other people most of the time, or if they do understand that people have emotions, they may not extend this to animals. Find a way of explaining why it's wrong to him.
    It is often the lack of expectation (placed on the child socially usually) to react to situations they dont understand (such as pragmatism and facial expressions) that leads it to appear that autistic people bond better with animals. Animals dont see double meanings in sentences after all, run does mean run, stop does mean stop, and we are not expected to read their expressions (likewise computers. Trying to remove many autistic children from computers to get them to play outside is often a painful experience! literally )

    I dont mean this to seem like i am 'attacking' anything you said, more i wanted to hopefully add something?
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    (Original post by L-J-B)
    It is often the lack of expectation (placed on the child socially usually) to react to situations they dont understand (such as pragmatism and facial expressions) that leads it to appear that autistic people bond better with animals. Animals dont see double meanings in sentences after all, run does mean run, stop does mean stop, and we are not expected to read their expressions (likewise computers. Trying to remove many autistic children from computers to get them to play outside is often a painful experience! literally )
    I also find that I actually prefer the company of animals. It's not as simple as 'people are socially confusing and animals aren't'; in fact, if you look at the power structures and body language involved in the social interactions of say a pack of dogs, they're probably as complex as humans. (Not that dogs get offended in quite the same way as humans, but they still communicate an awful lot via body language and the like. Watch a programme like the one where the man lives with wolves, observe the lengths he goes to to fit in with their pack, and you'll see what I mean; you don't need much understanding of animals to be their owners, but if you want to befriend them fully, it's arguably as complex as befriending a human.)

    I don't think it's just to do with things being easier, is my point; animals often fit the social needs of autistic people better for a variety of reasons. In my case, it's because I didn't have siblings until I was 4, my mum was at work and my dad was writing a thesis, so I learnt to socially interact from being with my dogs; with other autistic people, it's because they're tactile or whatever.

    (Again, same disclaimer as you - not that this is meant to attack what you said, more that it's an interesting point to think about )
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    (Original post by kerily)
    I also find that I actually prefer the company of animals. It's not as simple as 'people are socially confusing and animals aren't'; in fact, if you look at the power structures and body language involved in the social interactions of say a pack of dogs, they're probably as complex as humans. (Not that dogs get offended in quite the same way as humans, but they still communicate an awful lot via body language and the like. Watch a programme like the one where the man lives with wolves, observe the lengths he goes to to fit in with their pack, and you'll see what I mean; you don't need much understanding of animals to be their owners, but if you want to befriend them fully, it's arguably as complex as befriending a human.)

    I don't think it's just to do with things being easier, is my point; animals often fit the social needs of autistic people better for a variety of reasons. In my case, it's because I didn't have siblings until I was 4, my mum was at work and my dad was writing a thesis, so I learnt to socially interact from being with my dogs; with other autistic people, it's because they're tactile or whatever.

    (Again, same disclaimer as you - not that this is meant to attack what you said, more that it's an interesting point to think about )
    I see what your saying and believe it is a very valid 'development'? (for want of better words )

    Having said that one of the things i have found autistic children have significant difficulty in coping with, is firstly reading the emotion and secondly how this emotion 'should' affect them.

    Reading emotions is often translated through teaching by wrote. This face is 'happy' this face is 'sad'. This is achievable. I would argue (in a nice way, if i can!) that although animals do have complex social interactions the pressure for autistic children to learn them is less. I have probably not worded this well so i will try to explain another way.

    In the english language context is everything. Someones expression or tone may signify two opposing meanings. Thank you, can mean more than thank you. A failure to pick up on this can lead to frustration on the part of an autistic child. When a dog barks it undoubtedly has some meaning however there is no real honus to actually decipher what it means. The way the dogs face looks when it barks is of little consequence. The range of emotions for an animal may be very complex however they can be (more so than with humans) nicely pigeon holed into specific catagories. When baxter waves his tail it means he wants a walk. it always means this (even if it doesnt the dog isnt going to complicate this form of positive association). it is never realistcally going to be, when baxter waves his tail it means he wanted a walk three bl00dy hours ago- so hop on it!.

    I think we may even be saying the same sort of thing with minor differences? Or perhaps i am misunderstanding your post slightly?

    I knew an autistic child who liked dogs because he liked wet dog smell! im not sure how this fits if at all (and i take it as a sign of just how widely compassing autism can be)

    I confess this is mainly educated speculation on my part. Whilst i have read on autism and social interactions (and it may have briefly mentioned animals) i have made some assumptions which i feel are fairly valid from my experiences. Having said that you might just change my opinion....
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    Have a go at him the same way you would anyone else.

    Being autistic isn't an excuse for being a ****.
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    (Original post by imperial maniac)
    Have a go at him the same way you would anyone else.

    Being autistic isn't an excuse for being a ****.

    So whats your excuse? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by L-J-B)
    So whats your excuse? :rolleyes:
    I'm bigger than you.
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    I would be pissed as well xD

    Umm... get him something else he can play with? Or
    Be very tough on him, hmm... try telling him off severely?

    Or an even better way:

    Buy him Minecraft. You won't see him for months.
 
 
 
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