llys
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I am puzzled because the average spending per pupil is at around 5,000£, but university students who have much less contact time, and whose lecturers (in my experience) are not paid more than teachers, will pay on average 8,500£.

Neither (state) schools nor universities are for profit organisations. So I assume that these ^ numbers indicate the actual cost of educating a pupil / student. So what makes a school less expensive to run than a university?
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Aj12
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Not sure. My college had a budget of 6 million apparently
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llys
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(Original post by Aj12)
Not sure. My college had a budget of 6 million apparently
For how many pupils?
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Aj12
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(Original post by llys)
For how many pupils?
Around 2 thousand. Starting to wonder if that figure was right though. Seems a hell of a lot
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chidona
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(Original post by llys)
I am puzzled because the average spending per pupil is at around 5,000£, but university students who have much less contact time, and whose lecturers (in my experience) are not paid more than teachers, will pay on average 8,500£.

Neither (state) schools nor universities are for profit organisations. So I assume that these ^ numbers indicate the actual cost of educating a pupil / student. So what makes a school less expensive to run than a university?
Universities hire a lot more staff than schools do, and have a lot more infrastructure as well to maintain.

The cost of running a school depends really on how many pupils are there, the quality of the teachers (no surprise that higher pay attracts higher quality teachers) and infrastructure.
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llys
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(Original post by chidona)
Universities hire a lot more staff than schools do, and have a lot more infrastructure as well to maintain.

The cost of running a school depends really on how many pupils are there, the quality of the teachers (no surprise that higher pay attracts higher quality teachers) and infrastructure.
What do you mean by "infrastructure" ? Building maintenance, electricity etc.?

---
I suppose that universities have disproportionately more administrative staff than schools.
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Kareir
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And Universities aren't just educational centres, they research too.

_Kar.
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johnnn
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In that budget you have all the top dogs making big 6 figure salarys thats where alot of the money goes!!
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llys
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(Original post by Kareir)
And Universities aren't just educational centres, they research too.

_Kar.
I think that most research grants don't come out of the university budget though. At least my boss has external grants; all of his postdocs have their own grants (not paid by the university), and half of his PhD students are paid their salary from his grants (again, not by the university).

His salary is paid by the university. But he has to pay the overheads for lab space, electricity etc. out of his grants...
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teshnit
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I go to a private grammer, pupils * fees, leads me to believe theres a turnover of £11.5m just for the senior + junior school, 800 senior, 400 junior.
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llys
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(Original post by johnnn)
In that budget you have all the top dogs making big 6 figure salarys thats where alot of the money goes!!
Yes, I guess there are lot more well-paid none-jobs at university..
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viksta1000
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My school got a total budget for 2010/2011 of £22.5m, to pay for maintenance, staff, electricity, stationary, books etc and we got a £1m grant to build a new building

Seems alot, but with a student number of 2100 and staff of 450 (not including cooks and supply staff) it seems reasonable


EDIT: its not a private school its a high school/6th form/sports college combo!
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chidona
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(Original post by llys)
What do you mean by "infrastructure" ? Building maintenance, electricity etc.?

---
I suppose that universities have disproportionately more administrative staff than schools.
Yeah, depreciation on their capital stock, essentially. Any university has an immense amount of physical capital (buildings, teaching equipment etc.) that's in continual need of replacement or repair. An average school has nowhere near the same amount.

And it's not just admin staff - the university may well hire out cleaning firms and catering staff, on a scale that is likely to be equivalent, if not greater, to a typical school.
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Tony_Soprano1
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How to run a bad school?

10 Unskilled Teachers left with no options but to teach and who uninspire themselves let alone students
1 Janitor potential peado
100 Tons of industrial size toilet paper obviously the children need some activity to do
10000 Uniforms imported from a china sweatshop
A few grants from my mate dave for some shiney whiteboards

and BAM you have a school
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jhubbert
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In my college it's about 4-5 million for 900 pupils. Don't forget that most of that goes towards staff salaries with well over 100 members of staff
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ilickbatteries
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Depends on the size of the school.

Think of a school like a business.

Overheads : Heating, lighting, insurance, maintenance of equipment, maintenance of grounds, maintenance of buildings

Staff : Teaching staff - Headteachers can be on 80k+, deputy heads on 45k+, subject heads 40k+, teachers at the top of the payscale 34k, etc.

Then there's the administrative staff, such as the receptionists, those who work in finance, then the support staff (reprographics, teaching assistants, lab techs, librarians) maintenance staff (caretakers, cleaners) kitchen staff (dinnerladies etc)

Then there are other costs, such as things put on for students like discos, plays, music lessons. Books, lab equipment, paper, computers, photocopiers, chairs, tables and so on.

Schools are not cheap!
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ily_em
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(Original post by teshnit)
I go to a private grammer, pupils * fees, leads me to believe theres a turnover of £11.5m just for the senior + junior school, 800 senior, 400 junior.
What about scholarships though? I doubt all 1200 pupils pay the whole fees...
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Steevee
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Don't forget also that Universities have to subsidse and run Halls and so on.
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teshnit
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(Original post by ily_em)
What about scholarships though? I doubt all 1200 pupils pay the whole fees...
Idk how many scholarships there are, but I know i am on a 100% scholarship :P However 1200 pupils was a conservative estimate anyway
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Mr M
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(Original post by llys)
So what makes a school less expensive to run than a university?
Particle accelerators cost more than crayons.
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