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    I am actually a law undergrad but I prefer History as a subject to Law, how would I go about becoming a history lecturer? What postgrad courses would I have to take? Thanks
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    At the very least a History related PhD; you may even have to be a BA/MA in History..
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    Thanks guys, so you need to have at least an MA or BA to do a phd?

    Also, one of my tutors at university told us he only just recently completed his phd (as in he was completing his phd while working as a tutor). What exactly would his job title have been as he was not a lecturer, didn't have a phd and was only a tutor?
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    (Original post by PerigeeApogee)
    Different universities require different things from their PhD applicants. Usually you need at least an upper second class undergraduate degree. Some universities don't mind if it's a Bachelors or a Masters, but some do prefer a post-graduate qualification too.

    Tutoring and demonstrating is part of being a PhD student - it wasn't his job (although they do get paid by the hour for it).

    repped!! thanks cleared up alot
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    Just a heads up, but if you want to do a masters (and quite possibly a PhD), you need to have language skills - at masters level they usually look for French, German and Latin as a basic pre-requisite. You don't have to be able to speak it, just read it to a fairly decent standard.
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    (Original post by PerigeeApogee)
    Really? Why?

    Seems a bit stupid.
    Because believe it or not there are a lot of sources in foreign languages, especially if you're dealing with non British history. Even if you're doing British history, Medieval History has a load of French and Latin sources and anything from Early Modern onwards you'll need knowledge of French and/or German to get opposing views to the English language sources.
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    (Original post by PerigeeApogee)
    Really? Why?

    Seems a bit stupid.
    ajp100688 pretty much summed it up. A lot of sources you'll be dealing with may not be in English. At undergrad level you're allowed to look at translated versions of sources, but by the time you get to masters level, you're expected to be able to read/decipher the originals.

    It's the reason why I didn't pursue history beyond undergrad (despite having an offer given to me by senior lecturer without asking...was sooo tempting!). I'm appalling at languages. I can read and understand medieval english, but not french, german or latin well enough to get by.
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    (Original post by PerigeeApogee)
    Well, yes, but learning one language only enables you to view a fraction of the sources that are out there, and for all intents and purposes you'll be as much of a noob to the vast majority of sources as you were before you learned a language.
    Not really. Learn English, French and German and you're pretty solid for much modern European history because French was the diplomatic language (and the literate classes of Russia spoke it as their first language, not Russian) and most events revolved around speakers of those languages from the mid 18th century onwards. Sure you're never going to learn every language but every language you do learn is a benefit.

    Plus French provides a very useful base for Italian or Spanish if you really want to go onto them and Italian and Spanish are closely related.
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    (Original post by donotknow)
    I am actually a law undergrad but I prefer History as a subject to Law, how would I go about becoming a history lecturer? What postgrad courses would I have to take? Thanks
    I don't know about history lecturer work at UK. I had some part-time work as Law lecturer at Russia. But only cause I'm the 3d year of Law PhD course.
    The crisis, demography jam (different reasons connected with the times of USSR end) in the area. Not enough students. Less salary, less professors, so one small institute invited me for some part-time work with external students. Besides that's not at Moscow, that's at my town, so I didn't need to spend three hours a day at train, there and back. Rather comfortable.
    Before to become lecturer, I had to get the document from the rector of the place where I study at Moscow, which proved that I really study at 3d year of PhD course.
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    1) Become a history lecturer

    2) Teach with a left wing agenda

    3) have girls fap over you

    4) PROFIT!
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    (Original post by Harrifer)
    1) Become a history lecturer

    2) Teach with a left wing agenda

    3) have girls fap over you

    4) PROFIT!
    Works equally well with right wing. Case in point: Niall Ferguson. The fap subject of many a young right wing female historian.
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    (Original post by donotknow)
    I am actually a law undergrad but I prefer History as a subject to Law, how would I go about becoming a history lecturer? What postgrad courses would I have to take? Thanks
    Hey, I know it's like 2014 but I'm kind of going through the same dilemma, did you manage to find a pathway into becoming a History lecturer? Or have you changed your mind?
 
 
 
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