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Noob to motorbikes, many questions (for reps :)) watch

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    So i really want a motorbike to be honest. I already have a full driving licence and car, but a motorbike has always been something ive found really cool and what i want to do at some point. I only want that test where you can have a 125cc bike for two years then whatever you want after that. Im 20 in a month. So the questions:

    1. How much will it cost? I'm talking CBT test, theory test, practical test, a good secondhand 125cc bike and insurance?

    2. What 125cc bike should i go for? On a budget of up to £1500 roughly.

    3. Is the CBT test difficult?

    4. Is the practical test difficult?

    5. Are some test centres less strict than others? Im from leicestershire.

    6. What is the eye sight requirement for motorbikes? I passed my driving test and could see the registration when asked, is the distance further for bikes or the same?

    7. Do most people just pay for 6 months insurance then just put the bike away for winter? As it doesnt seem very safe during winter weather...


    Thats it for now. reps to everyone who can answer.
    Thank you!
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    First page motorbike soc

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    To do the motorbike test

    To start with you need to get your provisional licence. This costs £50, and will entitle you to ride a 50cc bike at 16, or a 125cc bike if you are 17 and over, with L plates, once you have taken the correct training.

    Next you need to complete your CBT

    This is a 1 day training course, which is complusary and lasts for 2 years once it is completed. It should cost about £100, and is carried out both on and off road, and teaches you to ride safely. There are 5 parts:
    eye sight
    Learning bike controls
    learning to ride the bike
    Talk about the highway code and bike safety
    Road riding

    Once successfully completed you get a certificate enabling you to ride a bike relevant to your age. You must ride displaying L plates, you can not go on motorways, or carry pillions. If you are 16, you can ride a 50Cc, or a 125cc if your 17 or over.

    Now if you want to get a bigger bike you have to complete your full test. The first stage is to complete your bike theory test- NOTE NOT THE CAR ONE. It costs £31, and is pretty much the same as the car test, although some questions are slightly different. This lasts 2 years, if it runs out, you need to retake it.

    Bike Test

    Once you are 17 you can take your full license. There are a couple of different license types:
    A1 which lets you ride a 125 cc, 11kW / 14.6 Bhp bike, without L plates, you can carry passengers.
    A2 which is the "Standard Motorcycle" test. Which allows you to ride a bike restricted to 33 Bhp for 2 years, and then your license is upgraded to a category A license. Can be done at 17
    A which is the "Direct Access" test, you have to be over 21, and when passed means you can ride anything.

    If you reach 21 before your 2 years are up, you can do your accelerated access, which means once passed you can ride anything.

    Lessons – you can learn by yourself, or lessons with an instructor like car lessons, or you can do an intensive course

    The motorbike test are the same, all that differs is the size of bike you take your test on. The bike tests have 2 parts.

    Module 1- from 15.50
    You must take with you your CBT certificate (DL196), your Theory and Hazard Perception Test pass certificate (less than 2 years old) and a valid licence. You must also be wearing suitable clothing. This covers manual handling, slalem and a figure of 8, cornering, hazard avoidance at 32mph, a U turn, slow riding, and an emergency stop at 32mph.It takes, on average, about 22 minutes. If you've reached the required standard your examiner will issue you with a pass certificate.

    Module 2- from £75
    Is a road ride taking about 40minutes, which assesses your ability to ride safely. You will start with an eye test, then 2 show me, tell me questions., before beginning the ride. You need all the documents you took to module one, plus the equipment.

    Bikes
    Once you pass bike test there are different sorts of bike you can ride, what you get depends on your license and also where you want to ride.

    125cc/250cc for town riding
    Aprilia RS125 (not learner legal as is 33bph when restricted)
    Honda's CBR125
    Yamaha YBR125

    Motorways 400cc plus – if you are on a restricted license you have to restrict these to 33bph, easily done by a garage.

    CBR400
    BANDIT 400
    Suzuki GS500
    Suzuki SV650
    XJ6
    CB500
    ER5
    ER6
    Gladius


    Do not go buy the first bike you see, try different bikes, as different styles suit different people. Please don't go buy an R6, you will probably kill yourself 5 miles down the road.

    Equipment
    By law you need a helmet. You should also get gloves, jacket, trousers, and boots. This doesn't mean full leathers, although these are still considered the best, but at £500 plus for a full suit, it can be expensive. Material protective clothing is a cheaper option, but sacrifices itself in an accident.
    Information.

    A helmet can cost from £45 although the more expensive ones will offer more protection, be quieter, wind proof, not fog up, can have blue tooth, an a sun visor built in.

    Gloves can cost from £30, you want leather gloves, with amour in the knuckles.

    Jackets cost from £60, you want textile or leather, with built in body amour, this will help absorb the impact of an accident.

    Trousers can be over trousers or instead of your normal trousers, and can cost from £40. Draggin jeans are an option, but while they will save your skin, you may still shatter your knee caps on impact, so you should look into some amour inserts for the point of impact, ie your knees,

    Boots. I'll be honest, I spent 3 years wearing hiking boots before finding a pair that fitted me. You can get boots from about £50, and the idea is in a crash they will hold your feet together. Trainers will not do this.

    Body armour is something you can use to increase your safety, for example a back protector (as made by knox or forcefield) could save your life, and possibly prevent you from being paralysed.

    Insurance
    If your male, its gonna be high.
    Insurance depends on the bike (smaller=cheaper) age (older=cheaper) how you lock it (is it alarmed, disc locked, locked to an immovable object with a chain, go to a price comparison site, put in some details and see what it says, this is the most accurate way of giving you an idea of what insurance will cost. On the plus size, its cheaper than a car (normally)

    Costs
    Motorbiking is not the cheapest hobby, you have insurance, road tax, petrol, plus the maintenance. If you can fix bikes yourself, such as using a haynes manual, it will work out cheaper. Good equipment lasts years, so it pays to invest if you are planning to bike long term. If you get a faired bike and you crash it, its going to cost a lot.

    http://www.begin-motorcycling.co.uk/tests.htm
    www.geton.co.uk
    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring...dMopeds/DG_292


    1. Full test and bike/ insurance, £2000 ish

    2. YBR/CG are recommended

    3. No it's training, you may be asked to come back for further training if you are dangerous

    4. i did my test before mod1/2 Ask in the motorbike soc, there is a very active on, on hte first page of the motoring forum!!!!

    5. All places should be the same for strictness, look at the pass rates for the different places if you are fussed

    6. Same distance as cars i believe

    7. I bike all year, every year, as soon as the snow goes i'm out. I also commute on it. Depends whether you want to be a sun warrior, or an all year biker, no right or wrong


    (Original post by Astra_K)
    Thats it for now. reps to everyone who can answer.
    Thank you!
    Sorry another edit. The restricted license isn't for a 125, you take your restricted license, which limits you to 33bhp. You can easily restrict a 500/600 bike to 33 bhp until your restriction for 2 years is up.

    The bike you get will depends on the riding you do, if you are going to do lots of play rides and jollys a 400cc+ bike restricted is what you need, for town rides and nipping places a 125 or small.

    I love riding in winter, as the crisp morning with no one else out are lovely. you just need common sense, if its snowing, sheet ice or very heavy rain don't ride unless you are confident. Do any of your friends ride? or do you know anyone older who would take you out?

    I am assuming the rest of the soc are out on their bikes, i know at least one is at the sea side.
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    CBT's easy. Full test is a bit trickier - you definitely need a few lessons, even if you could ride already, just to give them what they want. Same standards should apply at all centres. Eyesight requirements are the same as for cars.

    I ride all year, unless it's snowing or very icy.

    And I shall be at the seaside tomorrow :cool:
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    (Original post by Astra_K)
    So i really want a motorbike to be honest. I already have a full driving licence and car, but a motorbike has always been something ive found really cool and what i want to do at some point. I only want that test where you can have a 125cc bike for two years then whatever you want after that. Im 20 in a month. So the questions:

    1. How much will it cost? I'm talking CBT test, theory test, practical test, a good secondhand 125cc bike and insurance?

    2. What 125cc bike should i go for? On a budget of up to £1500 roughly.

    3. Is the CBT test difficult?

    4. Is the practical test difficult?

    5. Are some test centres less strict than others? Im from leicestershire.

    6. What is the eye sight requirement for motorbikes? I passed my driving test and could see the registration when asked, is the distance further for bikes or the same?

    7. Do most people just pay for 6 months insurance then just put the bike away for winter? As it doesnt seem very safe during winter weather...


    Thats it for now. reps to everyone who can answer.
    Thank you!
    On the license you're on about you can have up to 33bhp which includes 250s and restricted 500/600s..

    1. About 2k
    2 Something from a big jap manufacture... Honda CG125 would be best for 125 or Yamaha FZS600 Fazer restricted but that is heavier/less fuel efficient but a lot quicker...
    3. No, it's almost impossible to fail the CBT. It's not even a test, it's training...
    4. It's basically the same as the car test but slightly more complicated and you do it on a motorbike instead.
    5. No Same rules all rounds
    6. Same distance, i have to wear my glasses on my bike but it's no big deal...
    7. I'd say around 50% of riders are "fair weather riders" and only ride in summer and the rest are all year round riders... You just have to be extra careful when it's icy out...

    Also, check out the Motorbike Society. It's all the info BW posted and a bit more i've added to it over time(Adding the fazer to the bike list amongst other things... ) and it's all neatly organised...

    I'd say go there for any more questions but half of us often check the motoring forum for anything motorbike related. BW beat me here this time. Normally i get there first...
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    (Original post by Astra_K)
    So i really want a motorbike to be honest. I already have a full driving licence and car, but a motorbike has always been something ive found really cool and what i want to do at some point. I only want that test where you can have a 125cc bike for two years then whatever you want after that. Im 20 in a month. So the questions:

    1. How much will it cost? I'm talking CBT test, theory test, practical test, a good secondhand 125cc bike and insurance?

    2. What 125cc bike should i go for? On a budget of up to £1500 roughly.

    3. Is the CBT test difficult?

    4. Is the practical test difficult?

    5. Are some test centres less strict than others? Im from leicestershire.

    6. What is the eye sight requirement for motorbikes? I passed my driving test and could see the registration when asked, is the distance further for bikes or the same?

    7. Do most people just pay for 6 months insurance then just put the bike away for winter? As it doesnt seem very safe during winter weather...


    Thats it for now. reps to everyone who can answer.
    Thank you!
    wot they said

    but with my own opinions! (dont you love the internet)
    1. CBT is usually £110ish for weekdays, £130ish for weekends,
    theory £31,
    Practicle (mod1 - £15, Mod 2 £75) plus training at about £120 a day (you will probably want 4/5 days),
    bikes start at £400 (but will need lots of work).
    2. there are many to choose from, what type do you want? (scooter, cruiser, sports, naked, supermoto etc...)
    3. if you can ride a bicycle, no.
    having said that many people dont get it the first try, i took two (had trouble with the gears). retakes are usual half price (at most places)
    4. Mod 1 is kind of, because its all unnatural, Mod 2 is just normal riding (same as a car test, just on a bike).
    5.dont think so
    6. same as the car one
    7.no, real men ride bikes all year
    (its really not that bad, aside from the month or so when it snows)

    and just to make a point, i think you're slightly mistaken.
    on a CBT you can ride a 125cc bike for two years.
    during this you should take the test, where (if under 21) you will be restricted to 33bhp (about a modern 250cc) for two years, then derestriction (only 15 months till mine :w00t:).

    if you want just a 125 for now, id say to stick on just a CBT for 6 months. this will make it much easier when you come to do your test.
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    (Original post by Boristhethird)
    wot they said

    but with my own opinions! (dont you love the internet)
    1. usually £110ish for weekdays, £130ish for weekends
    3. if you can ride a bicycle, no.
    having said that many people dont get it the first try, i took two (had trouble with the gears). retakes are usual half price (at most places)
    OP is not just asking about CBT btw in Q1...

    They're asking about CBT+all tests + insurance + cheap bike...

    So that's like £120 +£100+(Maybe a few £100 in training) + Like £1000 for an alright condition bike + £300 to insure + a few hundred on kit as well as they don't mention having any...

    Am i the only one that totally blagged my CBT then? I turn up on 16 years 1 day after booking it 4 months before and he'd forgotten about me...
    I was in full bike kit though whereas the other 2 guys at the same time were just wearing normal clothes with a crap old helmet. I jumped on the back of the instructors bike back round to his house and he pointed at a bike and said jump on that and i was off... Although i had spent the last few months before riding my 50cc bike every other day around the grounds and playing on the trials bike as well... :cool:

    He said my only problem was overconfidence...
    He said i treated the road like a racetrack and that i thought i was Valentino Rossi... I told him that's nonsense as i'm English i was clearly Toseland...
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    1. How much will it cost? I'm talking CBT test, theory test, practical test, a good secondhand 125cc bike and insurance?

    CBT is about 90 notes, Direct Access Course is anywhere up to 700 depending on how many days, bike for upto 1k and then insurance up to 400. I'd personally reccomend riding on a CBT for a couple of months. Not only will this make the tests MUCH easier and less stressful, it will get you a lot of valuable experience on a smaller bike

    2. What 125cc bike should i go for? On a budget of up to £1500 roughly.

    Depends what you want it for. Honda CG's are the usual learner bikes, I find them too small, don't like the handling or feel.

    Honda Varadero's are very good, the feel like a ''proper'' bike, quite large. I swear by aprilia RS125's, handle like a big super sports, quick (should be restricted, still quick in restricted guise) but only if you like to tinker with them as they're not the most reliable.


    3. Is the CBT test difficult?

    Not at all. it's not a test, it teaches you the basics. worse case senario they'll ask you to come back another day for an extension if your riding simply isn't up to scratch. in my experience, it takes you falling off or ignoring the highway code for this to happen.

    4. Is the practical test difficult?

    yes and no. Module 1 handles all the manouvers. I found it suprisingly easy once I concentrated, but I rode for 2 years on CBT. Get a school that has access to the test site on Sundays - mine did and it meant a day of doing the test with my instructor, meanning the test the next day was routine. Cant reccomend that enough. It's not ''easy'' though, I would have struggled if doing it personally if new to biking. confidence is the key with this test.

    whilst waiting for my test, I saw 4 people fail and heard of another 6 that week, 8 of which were doing intensive week long courses.

    module 2 is just a road ride, which if you've been riding on CBT shouldn't be too difficult.

    I disagree with one week courses for freshies, I just don't think it gives you the experience required to jump on a big bike.



    5. Are some test centres less strict than others? Im from leicestershire.

    The centres aren't what defines 'strictness' it's all down to the examiner at the end of the day.. they should all be following the same guidelines, some may let certain minor things slide.

    6. What is the eye sight requirement for motorbikes? I passed my driving test and could see the registration when asked, is the distance further for bikes or the same?

    it's the same

    7. Do most people just pay for 6 months insurance then just put the bike away for winter? As it doesnt seem very safe during winter weather...

    UIsually you'll have to stump up for a year, you can of course cancel it but wont accrue any no claims. at the end of the day, bike insurance is generally cheap enough not to matter too much!
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    (Original post by omarion526)
    4. Is the practical test difficult?

    yes and no. Module 1 handles all the manouvers. I found it suprisingly easy once I concentrated, but I rode for 2 years on CBT. Get a school that has access to the test site on Sundays - mine did and it meant a day of doing the test with my instructor, meanning the test the next day was routine. Cant reccomend that enough. It's not ''easy'' though, I would have struggled if doing it personally if new to biking. confidence is the key with this test.

    whilst waiting for my test, I saw 4 people fail and heard of another 6 that week, 8 of which were doing intensive week long courses.

    module 2 is just a road ride, which if you've been riding on CBT shouldn't be too difficult.

    I disagree with one week courses for freshies, I just don't think it gives you the experience required to jump on a big bike.



    7. Do most people just pay for 6 months insurance then just put the bike away for winter? As it doesnt seem very safe during winter weather...

    UIsually you'll have to stump up for a year, you can of course cancel it but wont accrue any no claims. at the end of the day, bike insurance is generally cheap enough not to matter too much!
    I just looked up the different parts of mod 1 on the internet and then rode around the large car park at work doing them the day before and they were fairly easy... It's just basic machine control at the end of the day...

    OP, if you do your CBT and then buy/ride a 125 before doing your test you can just do that. The entire plan of what is in mod1 is online in many places. Just print it off then go to a large empty car park and job sorted...

    Good point about paying for the whole year anyway. I'm 19 years with 3 years NCB. Tis a nice feeling...

    Also, what motorbike do you have and details etc?
    Not seen you round these parts before... If you wanna come enjoy random motorbike chat there's a society thread on here...
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    What sort of bike do you fancy?

    You're not limited to just crotch rockets on a baby licence, you know!
    If you're rocking a 125 you're not going to be going anywhere quickly anyway no matter what it is, so you could look at a cruiser. Suzuki Intruder, Honda Shadow etc?

    As for once you've passed your test, you can get pretty much anything restricted these days. I was in Harley Davidson the other day looking at Sportsters (that's what I'll be going for when I pass my test) and was told that they can restrict those if you wish. The fuel injection ones are the easiest apparently. It's around £45 since it's a plug and play jobby on a laptop. The carb fed models are more expensive to restrict since it involves changing parts.
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    (Original post by MHorman)
    I just looked up the different parts of mod 1 on the internet and then rode around the large car park at work doing them the day before and they were fairly easy... It's just basic machine control at the end of the day...

    Good point about paying for the whole year anyway. I'm 19 years with 3 years NCB. Tis a nice feeling...

    Also, what motorbike do you have and details etc?
    Not seen you round these parts before... If you wanna come enjoy random motorbike chat there's a society thread on here...
    True you can deffo do that, some people will really benefit from doing the actual course though - totally depends on the person and that but makes it much easier (or did for me!) to have the exact experience just before, and you can't practice the speed manuvers in the same way with the layout, speed etc on the road.. I read that the highest failure rate is for guys on those week long courses.. can sort of see why! really helped to know what the examiner expected and how he'd approach you. My friend did it easily enough off the cbt, failled the first attempt on speed and an obbo but passed the second I think, so it can be done..

    Cheers will pop in I've got an ER5 at the mo just as a workhorse, cheap and cheerful! Getting a GSXR at the end of the month hopefully though!


    (Original post by JC.)
    What sort of bike do you fancy?

    You're not limited to just crotch rockets on a baby licence, you know!
    If you're rocking a 125 you're not going to be going anywhere quickly anyway no matter what it is, so you could look at a cruiser. Suzuki Intruder, Honda Shadow etc?

    As for once you've passed your test, you can get pretty much anything restricted these days. I was in Harley Davidson the other day looking at Sportsters (that's what I'll be going for when I pass my test) and was told that they can restrict those if you wish. The fuel injection ones are the easiest apparently. It's around £45 since it's a plug and play jobby on a laptop. The carb fed models are more expensive to restrict since it involves changing parts.
    like you say, depends on what the op's after.. Honda shadows are very nice bikes. Simply wouldn't suit me but very nice, but you can make good progress on a 'sporty' 125. Not sure on the performance figures of the restricted RS, but uncut they will get to 60 in 6.5 and you can utterly chuck them into corners, where as the shadow is very much sit back and relax, and much much slower. anyway, thought you were pretty anti-bike? :lol:

    you can restrict anything via blade, re-jetting or ecu alteration but on a harley you probably wouldn't want to! They weigh a tonne typically, and do not drag well when tied down.. Injected bikes are usually restricted by what's effectively a piggyback ecu or by physically limiting the throttle range. Ruins a lot of what the bigger bikes are about though.. The Carb restrictors usually don't require any replacement parts, just simply adding some restricting washers to the carb inlet / outlets (between the carb and engine usually) my ER5 was restricted when I bought it from a freind and it made sense, didnt cripple it too badly for his licence, but was still quite wheezy.

    Whipped out my restrictors at the weekend. He paid #200 odd, it took me 15 minutes to do and the kit consisted of this:



    There was an article in a mag somewhere where a rich kid restricted an R1.. which got utterly spanked by a de-restricted RS125..
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    Thanks for the replies, it all seems a bit clearer now. Just wish i knew more about bikes lol, like i have pretty good car knowledge
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    (Original post by Astra_K)
    Thanks for the replies, it all seems a bit clearer now. Just wish i knew more about bikes lol, like i have pretty good car knowledge
    What do you need to know about bikes?
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    (Original post by omarion526)
    anyway, thought you were pretty anti-bike? :lol:
    Well... I'm at the stage in my life now where I can afford to buy toys. The notion that you can use a bike every day and have no other method of transport is all well and good, but in the real world it doesn't work but that's a different thread all together, eh?

    I've not really given bikes a propper try yet to decide one way or another. Although, I certianly wouldn't bother with a sports bike. I don't find them very comfortable to sit on. Besides which, squeezing 16 stone of bloke into a leather romper suit is just going to look silly.
    I'm quite up for a HD, though. When the restrictors come off it'll be like having a brand new bike for a few quid - same with any bike really.

    Anyway... we'll see what happens.
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    (Original post by JC.)
    Well... I'm at the stage in my life now where I can afford to buy toys. The notion that you can use a bike every day and have no other method of transport is all well and good, but in the real world it doesn't work but that's a different thread all together, eh?

    I've not really given bikes a propper try yet to decide one way or another. Although, I certianly wouldn't bother with a sports bike. I don't find them very comfortable to sit on. Besides which, squeezing 16 stone of bloke into a leather romper suit is just going to look silly.
    I'm quite up for a HD, though. When the restrictors come off it'll be like having a brand new bike for a few quid - same with any bike really.

    Anyway... we'll see what happens.
    If you're getting a Harlet i gotta reccomend this...


    The Xr1200 Trophy. It's beautiful...

    Although buying any Harley and restricting it to 33bhp would suck because whilst a 400/500/600 at 33bhp is still very quick a very large heavy harley would be quite combersome at such power...

    Ifyou just buy a good condition second hand bike at the right price you can probably sell it for the same price 2 years later and then buy a Harley...
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    (Original post by MHorman)
    If you're getting a Harlet i gotta reccomend this...


    The Xr1200 Trophy. It's beautiful...

    Although buying any Harley and restricting it to 33bhp would suck because whilst a 400/500/600 at 33bhp is still very quick a very large heavy harley would be quite combersome at such power...

    Ifyou just buy a good condition second hand bike at the right price you can probably sell it for the same price 2 years later and then buy a Harley...
    Harleys don't usually make much more then 33 anyway :lol:
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    (Original post by MHorman)
    If you're getting a Harlet i gotta reccomend this...


    The Xr1200 Trophy. It's beautiful...

    Although buying any Harley and restricting it to 33bhp would suck because whilst a 400/500/600 at 33bhp is still very quick a very large heavy harley would be quite combersome at such power...

    Ifyou just buy a good condition second hand bike at the right price you can probably sell it for the same price 2 years later and then buy a Harley...
    Dragging the thread o/t a bit, but I'll start out with a Suzuki intruder 125 and a Honda Rebel - i'll be doing this with my partner so we'll need 1 each.

    When I go for a bigger bike it'll be a Harley Davidson XL1200C. "Speed" is relative. If I want to go somewhere quickly, I've got an MGB V8 for that.

    This is more my bag:

 
 
 
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