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Poll: Do you support the reintroduction of Grammar Schools? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you support the reintroduction of Grammar Schools in the UK?
    Yes, but only if we change the admission process (alternative to the 11+)
    36.57%
    Yes, with the current 11+
    51.41%
    No
    12.02%

    • Thread Starter
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    The Conservative party officially does not support their reintroduction, do you?
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    They still exist you know....
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    They still exist, and yes.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    They still exist you know....
    Yes I know, they exist in small numbers in England mainly in the South-East, where I live and go to one. I meant mass reintroduction across the whole of the UK.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    They still exist you know....
    but not as many as there had previously been.

    there are only a few left
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    it gives those that cannot afford private education to get education of the same quality so of course they should bring back grammar schools with the old 11+ thing
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    If it's a straight choice between grammars and the current system, then yes, I support reintroducing grammar schools.
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    I'd support reintroducing grammar schools IF the change to get into one did not just boil down to the 11+ e.g. more teacher assessment and more chances to go to a grammar school further down the line.
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    My school gets a large portion of its intake from students who fail the 11+ in a neighbouring county where it's still in place. I think it's a bit strange how at the moment some places have it and some don't.

    I don't think they'd be able to reintroduce grammar schools because of the thing that governs all-money
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    Grammers are a waste of time. All they do is allow better off parents to buy houses in its catchment area and tutor their kids to pass the entrance exam.

    It fixes social classes rather than promote social mobility.
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    Personally I think there should be 1 or 2 in every city.

    As someone who attended a grammar school I can see the difference. I think the 11+ should stay aswell, it works and it isnt so difficult that they wouldnt get enough people but difficult that those who arent at the standard wouldnt attend.

    I personally got several scholarships to private schools but the grammar was so much more impressive. (and just so you know, im from a very poor background and got no tutoring for my 11+ and came top 5 in the county)

    The enviroment pushes the hard working to work harder just because of the competition. You want to be the best. For example, I remember in year 7, 8 and 9 we would have weekly math tests and everyone would get 90-100% in them because you wanted to be the best, you dont get that in ordinary schools.

    Of course you get some people who go off the rails a bit, I didnt do aswell as I could have at GCSE but i was still predicted 13 A*'s and if I had done any revision would have got them. But the people like me who didnt work hard still managed to get all A*-C's with no work whatsoever.

    Also I think the teachers may not nesscarily (sp?) be better but there definately more traditional in terms of strictness. If we got 1 warning in a week for bad behaviour or missing homework our form tutor would give us an afterschool detention. It meant only 1 or 2 people every week would not do homework in a whole class.

    It works and 98% of the people from my year are going to top universities and doing what they want to do.

    Yes there is an element of elitism, but then again that exists in higher education so its hardly the end of the world.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Grammers are a waste of time. All they do is allow better off parents to buy houses in its catchment area and tutor their kids to pass the entrance exam.

    It fixes social classes rather than promote social mobility.
    Actually it's the opposite, the whole point is that they don't have catchment areas so you can't 'buy' your way in like you can with top comprehensives. And social mobility was much higher when they grammar system was still in place.
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    No, definitely not. Secondary moderns (the implied ancillary of grammar schools) were, by and large, hellholes. The current system is deficient, yes, but the previous one was much worse.
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    I live in an area without opportunity and promise with a lot of gang violence and social deprivation. In Year 6, I passed my 11+ without tuition or paying for people to help me practice etc. I currently attend a high-performing Grammar school, and am going to be studying Law at Nottingham next year. I cannot help but support the mass expansion of Grammar schools, for they have done well by me and have given me a sense of purpose and empowerment.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Grammers are a waste of time. All they do is allow better off parents to buy houses in its catchment area and tutor their kids to pass the entrance exam.

    It fixes social classes rather than promote social mobility.
    That must be why our society had more social mobility when they existed :ahee:.
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    I used to go to a normal comprehensive and the teaching was awful, in all truth there was a lack of opportunities and the teachers did not care as much from my experience. I had to work so hard to get my GCSE's because I learnt everything by myself and as nobody else was working it was hard to be motivated

    I moved to a grammar school for Sixth form after passing some tests and now Im hopefully going to study Law at Cambridge next year

    I cant have seen that happening in my old school , not only because of the teachers but the attitude of the kids which would have been detrimental for me they don't really care about their work and this would have probably affected me due to disruptions

    So from my experience i think grammar school are very important they are a key component of social mobility in a way, providing people who want to work and can be bothered to go to school and behave with chances to do well in life

    However, they do lead to further segregation but I think the benefits outweigh the disadvantages
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Grammers are a waste of time. All they do is allow better off parents to buy houses in its catchment area and tutor their kids to pass the entrance exam.

    It fixes social classes rather than promote social mobility.
    Thats not true , the whole point is that they dont have catchment areas

    I go to a grammar school and I can assure you apart from one person in my year, all of us travel over one hour to get to school , i have to one and a half hours to get there
    Also well off parents would most probably still send their kids to private schools, it the snob value effect
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    (Original post by KingPrawn0356)
    Actually it's the opposite, the whole point is that they don't have catchment areas so you can't 'buy' your way in like you can with top comprehensives. And social mobility was much higher when they grammar system was still in place.
    False. (Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...condaryschools)

    They gave a ladder up to a select few (who would most probably have done relatively well anyway) from the working class, at the great expense of the rest (especially those in the so-called 'underclass') who were less competitive often due to significant and multifarious socio-economic disadvantages. Of course, most TSR users, including myself, may well have been able to get into a grammar school, however. The current system isn't perfect, but it would be a regressive step to return to the failed past. My position also stems from the belief that there isn't a great biological division in intelligence between the vast majority of us (which psychology largely supports). However, in terms of realpolitik, maybe it is the case that our economy requires an undereducated underclass, in which case we're shuffling the deckchairs on the Titanic.
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    I voted "Yes, but only if we change the admission process (alternative to the 11+)" because 1) I strongly believe that people from poorer backgrounds have the right to an education that is equal (or close) to that of independent schools, and 2) because despite this, I feel that the current means of testing isn't an accurate (enough) representation of a child's ability. Admittedly, this is probably partially because I myself failed to get into a grammar school in year 6 and I'm biased (although funnily enough I've got into the same school's sixth form for September), however I also firmly believe that a huge, huge part of somebody's life should not be decided on the basis of one little reasoning test. I feel that they should make their decisions based on a more broad range of information, such as school reports, forecast SATs results, and possibly multiple tests. Not likely to happen, though, as it would cost a lot of extra money which the education sector simply doesn't have.

    EDIT: Woah, didn't expect the negs. Whad I do? :/
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    I think people only need to watch 5 minutes of 'Jamie's Dream School' to realise why we need Grammar schools. It's not fair to put good students with these children, who are disfunctional because of their home lives. I mean that school must have cost hundreds of thousands and would have cost millions per year to run if those teachers weren't giving their time for free, so the idea that if we pump rubbish schools with tons of money has been blown thoroughly out of the water. It would be nice from my perspective if state schools were actually worth sending my children to, given that I have paid for them already. There are some good state schools in places like Guildford though, where they don't really have council estates.
 
 
 
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