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Vegans and Veggies answer this question please... watch

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    If you are against the consumption of meat why do your substitutes try to resemble meat?

    I just don't understand.

    Take Quorn for example, even the adverts try and push the idea that it's meat without being meat.

    If you don't eat meat why do some of you have a meal that is a 'fake' meat meal. Instead could you not have a meal with no meat with out making it seem meat based?
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    Most vegetarians are vegetarians because they don't like animals being killed to feed them or for dietary reasons. Eating quorn doesn't have any animals killed or pose the same concerns as meat. I fail to see the hypocrisy you seem to think there is.
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    It makes total sense as a marketing strategy as it has the potential to reach meat-eaters as well: "You can eat what you want, look! It's almost the same just without the cruelty."
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    (Original post by CoffeeStinks)
    If you are against the consumption of meat why do your substitutes try to resemble meat so much?

    I just don't understand.

    It's like someone who is madly against fur wearing a faux fur coat. You'd think that if they were that against it the would avoid it all together.

    Take Quorn for example, even the adverts try and push the idea that it's meat without being meat.
    well if someones eatin a meat burger and there friend is a vege then atleast they get to eat a vege burger. otherwise the veges wouldnt have a burger to eat =/ lolso its basicly for them to fit in plus it dont taste that bad is a good variety.
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    Most vegetarians are vegetarians because they don't like animals being killed to feed them or for dietary reasons. Eating quorn doesn't have any animals killed or pose the same concerns as meat. I fail to see the hypocrisy you seem to think there is.
    It's just that if the idea of eating meat doesn't appeal to someone, why would their alternative be 'fake' meat?

    I only asked the question because I was curious.
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    Taste has nothing to do with the ethical repercussions of eating meat. Truthfully most vegan substitutes don't really taste like meat much at all anyway, it's more about replicating the texture. There is plenty of vegan food which doesn't try and masquerade as a meat substitute but it tends to be in countries with a heavier emphasis on vegetarian/vegan culture such as Southeast Asia, in Western societies vegans tend to be converts and want something which they grew up with. It's not a moral dilemma.
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    (Original post by Manesh2468)
    well if someones eatin a meat burger and there friend is a vege then atleast they get to eat a vege burger. otherwise the veges wouldnt have a burger to eat =/ lolso its basicly for them to fit in plus it dont taste that bad is a good variety.
    I'd understand that reasoning for someone who likes eating meat but can't for health reasons etc. But if someone just doesn't want to eat meat because animals dying saddens them why would they want to eat an impression of a meat burger?
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    I don't want a real hotdog, and I don't want a weird shaped hotdog. So I have a quorn hotdog in stead so I don't look or feel weird.
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    I think its also to help the newer veggies 'convert', as someone may be used to eating sausages alot, they can have quorn sausages instead, which are still sausages but no animal needed to die. My friend loves meat, but is a veggy, so has fake meat instead :]
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    (Original post by CoffeeStinks)
    If you are against the consumption of meat why do your substitutes try to resemble meat so much?

    I just don't understand.

    It's like someone who is madly against fur wearing a faux fur coat. You'd think that if they were that against it the would avoid it all together.

    Take Quorn for example, even the adverts try and push the idea that it's meat without being meat.
    Quorn is a good example for your point I think. You're presuming people are veggie and vegan because they're against the consumption of animals, and it's hard to see how it can be justified when it's eggs.
    However the consumption of animals is obviously avoided in many cases (take a lot of the redwoods range).

    There's also this obsession with calling things substitutes or alternatives. Why we don't advocate having different foods, instead of dressing some up as alternative,s is beyond me. Take for example redwoods Lincolnshire style sausages. They taste nothing like sausages, and that's fine, they're a different food, they're a tasty food. Why can't we instead challenge this ludicrous embedded idea that you need meat, milk or eggs in a meal for it to be a meal?

    I suppose that might be your point (although that's unclear).
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    (Original post by Boo!xx)
    I think its also to help the newer veggies 'convert', as someone may be used to eating sausages alot, they can have quorn sausages instead, which are still sausages but no animal needed to die. My friend loves meat, but is a veggy, so has fake meat instead :]
    That has untrue implications about the egg industry.
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    (Original post by JCC-MGS)
    Taste has nothing to do with the ethical repercussions of eating meat. Truthfully most vegan substitutes don't really taste like meat much at all anyway, it's more about replicating the texture. There is plenty of vegan food which doesn't try and masquerade as a meat substitute but it tends to be in countries with a heavier emphasis on vegetarian/vegan culture such as Southeast Asia, in Western societies vegans tend to be converts and want something which they grew up with. It's not a moral dilemma.
    I wasn't trying to condemn them I was just curious as to their reasons.

    I did have Western culture on my mind while(st?) writing this thread. You have reminded me of Tamil food, even though they don't eat meat I never felt like their meals were trying to imitate a meat based meal.


    So like you said it must just be a cultural thing.
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    (Original post by CoffeeStinks)
    I'd understand that reasoning for someone who likes eating meat but can't for health reasons etc. But if someone just doesn't want to eat meat because animals dying saddens them why would they want to eat an impression of a meat burger?
    The distinction in this case is easy to make, it's not as if meat resembles the living being it came from.
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    (Original post by CoffeeStinks)
    I'd understand that reasoning for someone who likes eating meat but can't for health reasons etc. But if someone just doesn't want to eat meat because animals dying saddens them why would they want to eat an impression of a meat burger?
    cose it hasnt been formed from the harming of any living organism which by harming i mean killing cruelly and then eating it, if you think bout it, cows, lambs chickens n all that have eyes legs similar life systems, brains, lungs, kidneys they are more similar to us than most people think about, corn can be produced it large quantitys and its a natural thing that grows from the ground unlike animals, the whole corn into meat looking stuff is cose people come to realise all the torture animals go thro jus for us to eat em and then they become veges at which point they crave meat but dont want to due to there new wisdom and so they eat the vege version.

    im a meat eater btw and i have no problem with what happens, but its good to know the other halfs views.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Quorn is a good example for your point I think. You're presuming people are veggie and vegan because they're against the consumption of animals, and it's hard to see how it can be justified when it's eggs.
    However the consumption of animals is obviously avoided in many cases (take a lot of the redwoods range).

    There's also this obsession with calling things substitutes or alternatives. Why we don't advocate having different foods, instead of dressing some up as alternative,s is beyond me. Take for example redwoods Lincolnshire style sausages. they taste nothing like sausages, and that's fine, they're a different food, they're a tasty food. Why can't we instead challenge this ludicrous embedded idea that you need meat, milk or eggs in a meal for it to be a meal?

    I suppose that might be your point (although that's unclear).
    Well yes yours was defintely more articulate.

    What I was trying to say was why did there need to be impressions of meat based meals. Quorn has been selling fake 'meat' and I didn't understand why.

    The idea that if you don't have meat you must replace it with something meat like is what confused me.
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    Summat to put on a barbeque, init?
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    (Original post by CoffeeStinks)
    I wasn't trying to condemn them I was just curious as to their reasons.

    I did have Western culture on my mind while(st?) writing this thread. You have reminded me of Tamil food, even though they don't eat meat I never felt like their meals were trying to imitate a meat based meal.


    So like you said it must just be a cultural thing.
    Another thing to remember is that meat foods aren't really exclusively for meat. A burger is just a method of preparation and a shape to mould the meat into, so making a burger out of soya products isn't really meat imitation, it's just a variation on a theme. I do eat things like 'fake ham' though.
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    (Original post by CoffeeStinks)
    Well yes yours was defintely more articulate.

    What I was trying to say was why did there need to be impressions of meat based meals. Quorn has been selling fake 'meat' and I didn't understand why.

    The idea that if you don't have meat you must replace it with something meat like is what confused me.

    Companies don't like to challenge social norms a lot of the time because they might alienate a potential customer base. One norm is eating meat with every meal. Quorn has been trying to get meat eaters to eat their product with claims that you can't really tell the difference.

    Redwoods on the other hand appears to just not challenge the social norm, whilst it still isn't reaching out to a larger customer base. This might also be because of the small size of the company, as quorn is owned (last time I checked) by premier foods.

    It may also be to (at least from my view) a stronger set of ethics from red wood, where-by their aim is more to help vegans, and help people to cross over and make the connection, instead of concentrating on individual meals, concentrating on life style changes.

    It's hard to tell without talking about it with the organisations in question.
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    (Original post by CoffeeStinks)
    If you are against the consumption of meat why do your substitutes try to resemble meat?

    I just don't understand.

    Take Quorn for example, even the adverts try and push the idea that it's meat without being meat.

    If you don't eat meat why do some of you have a meal that is a 'fake' meat meal. Instead could you not have a meal with no meat with out making it seem meat based?
    I actually sort of get this and i'm a veggie... I've only just started eating Quorn because personally i felt, as a veggie, it was weird to eat something that was made to taste like meat... i.e. dead animals...

    But since going to uni i guess i now see it as a way of helping me get protein and it's good if you're with friends who are all eating burgers and you can eat a veggie burger. Plus it is does actually taste really good
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    You seem to think that it's the size, shape, texture or something that puts vegetarians off meat... it's not that.

    Quorn does not "push the idea that it is meat" lolwut, it is clearly advertised as a meat substitute. It merely resembles meat because it looks familiar to people and meat eaters are more likely to try it.
 
 
 
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