Turn on thread page Beta

PY2 - findings and conclusions for bennett levy marteau help?! watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello, Would someone please help me! I do not get any of bennett-Levy's findings, Can someone please explain it to me

    thanks in advance
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Here you go:

    Findings:

    1. BL&M calculated the mean ratings from both questionnaires on phobias (questionnaire 1) and characteristics (questionnaire 2). The questionnaires were asking about the same 29 animal species.

    2. Then calculated various correlations and the most significant relationships were found between nearness and ugliness and nearness and sliminess.

    This shows that ugly and slimy animals were less likely to want to be approached by the participants.

    Significant correlations were found for fear and ugliness and fear and sliminess.

    This shows that ugly and slimy animals elicited more fear.

    Although these were the most significant findings, correlations were found for phobia and all four characteristics e.g. moves quickly and suddenly.

    They also found that rats were the most feared animal.

    During the interviews they found that the reason for this was that the pts perceived the rat to be harmful, despite being told that it wasn’t. This may be due to rats spreading the plague.

    They also found gender differences where males were more likely to want to approach ten of the species than the females. This was measured by the characteristic ‘nearness’. No other gender differences were found.

    Conclusions:

    The findings suggest that we do have an innate preparedness for certain phobias, however, rather than having a ‘preparedness to fear’ specific animals themselves, it is likely we are born with a readiness to fear certain characteristics of the animal instead.

    This could be the strangeness of appearance, for instance the pts were scared of spiders perhaps because they had 8 legs and looked very different to the human form.

    Another characteristic is the animal’s threatening properties such as moving quickly or suddenly. However this study did not account for individual differences, for instance we don’t fear all animals that have these characteristics.

    An example would be a lizard which had threatening properties such as moving fast, but is not feared.

    These findings can however be used to help people overcome their phobias and deal with characteristics, for example.



    I hope this helps!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SpicyStrawberry)
    Here you go:

    Findings:

    1. BL&M calculated the mean ratings from both questionnaires on phobias (questionnaire 1) and characteristics (questionnaire 2). The questionnaires were asking about the same 29 animal species.

    2. Then calculated various correlations and the most significant relationships were found between nearness and ugliness and nearness and sliminess.

    This shows that ugly and slimy animals were less likely to want to be approached by the participants.

    Significant correlations were found for fear and ugliness and fear and sliminess.

    This shows that ugly and slimy animals elicited more fear.

    Although these were the most significant findings, correlations were found for phobia and all four characteristics e.g. moves quickly and suddenly.

    They also found that rats were the most feared animal.

    During the interviews they found that the reason for this was that the pts perceived the rat to be harmful, despite being told that it wasn’t. This may be due to rats spreading the plague.

    They also found gender differences where males were more likely to want to approach ten of the species than the females. This was measured by the characteristic ‘nearness’. No other gender differences were found.

    Conclusions:

    The findings suggest that we do have an innate preparedness for certain phobias, however, rather than having a ‘preparedness to fear’ specific animals themselves, it is likely we are born with a readiness to fear certain characteristics of the animal instead.

    This could be the strangeness of appearance, for instance the pts were scared of spiders perhaps because they had 8 legs and looked very different to the human form.

    Another characteristic is the animal’s threatening properties such as moving quickly or suddenly. However this study did not account for individual differences, for instance we don’t fear all animals that have these characteristics.

    An example would be a lizard which had threatening properties such as moving fast, but is not feared.

    These findings can however be used to help people overcome their phobias and deal with characteristics, for example.



    I hope this helps!
    Oh my gosh! thankyou, in my book that the teacher gave gave me some correlation graph and its just confused me. hope findings and conclusions of BL&M Doesnt come up!! thanks!!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mwahx)
    Oh my gosh! thankyou, in my book that the teacher gave gave me some correlation graph and its just confused me. hope findings and conclusions of BL&M Doesnt come up!! thanks!!
    No problem, if you're having trouble with any of the other core studies feel free to PM me and I'll do my best to help
 
 
 

University open days

  1. University of Bradford
    University-wide Postgraduate
    Wed, 25 Jul '18
  2. University of Buckingham
    Psychology Taster Tutorial Undergraduate
    Wed, 25 Jul '18
  3. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Campus Visit Undergraduate
    Wed, 1 Aug '18
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.