Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

fees for english student in scotland, wales or ireland watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I'm English, so what kind of fees could I expect from Welsh, Scottish, (northern/Republic) Irish universities, starting from september 2012 (hopefully when I start uni, unfortunately)

    ???????
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    In Scotland, I believe it might vary slightly between unis - roughly £1800 for most courses, and more for Medicine (I currently pay £2895). They're not expected to rise in 2012 more than normal inflation.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I've applied to St Andrews in Scotland, and for 2011-2012 they want £1820. Which will most likely go up a bit, but nothing like England is. And Ireland are also an independent of England, so their fees will stay pretty much the same I think.
    But in Wales it looks like they will go up with England, so if you're aim is to avoid the high fees it looks like Scotland and Ireland, but you'll be treated like an EU member in Ireland, not a home student. (Because technically Ireland is a totally different country)

    But if you want to go to Uni to study, the higher fees shouldn't really stop you. they do looking daunting when you look at them, but the Government has also enforced rules that the Unis should provide even more bursaries and grants to those that need them and that you also have a fairly good paying back system.

    Anyway, I hope this helped.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks.

    B-S, I thought Scotland was a bit stupid with this because I heard somewhere that scottish and EU residence get it for free, but English students have to pay, and i thought it'd be a lot :/ . . .
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nix-j-c)
    I'm English, so what kind of fees could I expect from Welsh, Scottish, (northern/Republic) Irish universities, starting from september 2012 (hopefully when I start uni, unfortunately)

    ???????
    The Republic of Ireland is free from the Irish Republic and the EU. I'm assuming you're British, therefore classed as an EU student.

    There are other EU countries whose universities do not charge fees to "home" (including EU) students and offer a significant number, often the majority, of courses in English. Netherland and Sweden for example
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nix-j-c)
    Thanks.

    B-S, I thought Scotland was a bit stupid with this because I heard somewhere that scottish and EU residence get it for free, but English students have to pay, and i thought it'd be a lot :/ . . .
    Yeah, that's something that is currently being debated about in Scottish government, that it's kind of unfair for the English to be paying when we're technically part of the EU bunch.


    (Original post by River85)
    The Republic of Ireland is free from the Irish Republic and the EU. I'm assuming you're British, therefore classed as an EU student.

    There are other EU countries whose universities do not charge fees to "home" (including EU) students and offer a significant number, often the majority, of courses in English. Netherland and Sweden for example
    Woo for Sweden!! Sorry, I get a little excited whenever I see that word... :woo:
    But that is true, Sweden don't ask for fees. But you have to be careful about which Unis you go to for a course taught in English... they don't all do stuff in english.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helsy)
    But that is true, Sweden don't ask for fees. But you have to be careful about which Unis you go to for a course taught in English... they don't all do stuff in english.
    Yeah, I didn't mean all.

    I made a mistaken when I said the Dutch don't charge fees. As I think Amsterdam's fees are just about 1700 euros. But that's still considerable cheaper than here.

    In short, if you do to a university in the EU you will pay the same tuition fee as home students. If home students don't pay fees, as is the case in Sweden and the Irish Republic, In some countries (Sweden, Ireland) there are no tuition fees. In others (Netherlands for example) fees are charged but are lower.

    Fees are still charged in Northern Ireland as it is part of a different country, of course.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Scotland isn't a member state of the EU although it's part of the UK, which is. Therefore it's considered a domestic variation. However, other EU member states are eligible for the most preferential (i.e. Scottish) rate
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.