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Should I firm and go to QM or try adjustment ??????? watch

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    Basically my problem is that would like to do Economics at uni, so far i have got the following offers:
    Queen Mary- AAB (Likely to be firm)
    City- AAB
    Royal Holloway- ABB (Maybe insurance)
    Brunel- BBC (likely to be insurance)

    And i was rejected by LSE for economics and economic history (AAB)........

    My prediction is:
    Maths- A
    Economics- A
    Further Maths-B

    But i'm sure that I can get an A* in maths my only problem was S1 last year and also I can get an A* in Economics as well.

    My problem is that after being rejected by LSE, i feel incapable of doing well in the future careerwise. As I would like to work for a major banking or investment firm, working as a stockbroker, investment banker, someone who specialises on Sharia compliant market or be a financial consultant. I feel that by going to QM i will be put at a significant disadvantage even if I get a 2:1 or a first in comparison to someone who did as good at a Russell group uni.

    I have been speaking to many people in the city and some other links, they all said my choice of universities wasn't very good, but i got to stay in London to due to personal reasons. One contact who works at the human resources department at Goldman Sachs said that they look at where you get your degree from, they personally look at whether the universities is a top 10 uni in general

    I was looking at the prospects of doing better than my predictions which I am very confident of, so I believe that could try doing adjustment despite the very low success rate.

    Anyone have any ideas on whether any top universities for Economics do adjustment? In particular SOAS or LSE ( I know probably they might not, but i need every lead i can get )

    Also anyone know whats the best route I can take into getting into a top job but still going to QM? Like I was thinking masters, but its like £20+ at LSE

    Thought about adjusting or doing extra maybe because i meet the requirements for Bristol, Southampton, Manchester and Edinburgh so anyone got any ideas ?????????

    All the help will be appreciated
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    Go to Queen Mary! It's one of the top unis, no?
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    (Original post by Padini)
    Go to Queen Mary! It's one of the top unis, no?
    Well its up there , but not high enough i wanna go somewhere which is in the top 10 in general or for Economics in particular :/
    QM is good but the area lets it down so firms dont look at it well.
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    You have to have firmed a university (QM here) to use adjustment anyway. Adjustment is the process on results day where you have got into your firm, but your grades excel the offer they gave you. For example in your case: Queen Mary Firmed for AAB, you get A*A*B. You have five days after your QM offer becomes unconditional to find a place. You won't lose your QM offer if you can't. So if you are not content with going to QM you can try adjustment (if you exceed their offer requirements) without fear of losing your spot there.
    The problem here is that LSE is fiercely competitive and there is a very small chance of getting anything in Adjustment from them. This is the same situation at all of the 'top ten' universities you described. If you are really, truly unhappy with your QM choice then I suggest you reapply. But do remember that the fees do greatly increase next year and the pay-back system is changing.

    For more information on adjustment: http://www.ucas.com/students/nextsteps/adjustment/
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    The major contributing factor to you getting rejected by LSE was probably the fact that you're doing such a narrow subject base (Maths, Further Maths and Economics). LSE explicitly warns against this on their website; Further Maths is only seen as a fourth additional A-level by them.

    QMUL isn't a bad university by a long shot, it's quite good in fact. It's going to be hard to get into IB from there but it does happen.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    LSE explicitly warns against this on their website; Further Maths is only seen as a fourth additional A-level by them.
    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/undergra..._BSc_Econ.aspx

    Where does it say that?

    OP: Adjustment has a minute chance of working out (only about 11% of people who enter it get an offer; statistically, more people who register don't go to university at all in that year than Adjust) and you are unlikely to Adjust to a 'top ten in general' university' - they have more than enough applications and offer holders to cover them, and often end up with too many students; if you were going from CCC to BBC, you'd have more of a chance.

    However, you have to be in it to have any chance and, to use Adjustment, you need to have a firm university ... so definitely pick a firm.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/undergra..._BSc_Econ.aspx

    Where does it say that?

    OP: Adjustment has a minute chance of working out (only about 11% of people who enter it get an offer; statistically, more people who register don't go to university at all in that year than Adjust) and you are unlikely to Adjust to a 'top ten in general' university' - they have more than enough applications and offer holders to cover them, and often end up with too many students; if you were going from CCC to BBC, you'd have more of a chance.

    However, you have to be in it to have any chance and, to use Adjustment, you need to have a firm university ... so definitely pick a firm.
    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/undergra...economics.aspx

    Please note, however, that Further Maths, if taken as a full A level, is generally seen as an 'additional' or fourth subject, rather than a substitute for one of your three main subjects. Thus a combination of Maths, Further Maths and one other subject is not seen as providing the required breadth of knowledge and skills.
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    That's for 2012. OP isn't (I'm assuming) applying for 2012 entry.

    If OP is applying for deferred entry, then you are correct and I apologise.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    That's for 2012. OP isn't (I'm assuming) applying for 2012 entry.

    If OP is applying for deferred entry, then you are correct and I apologise.
    I remember seeing this same information a long time ago, on a different page (I think they've changed their website layouts for each department recently for the whole 2012 entry shake up). Even if they didn't explicitly state Further Maths was seen as a fourth A-level, it should've been pretty obvious - their standard offer just included a pass in FM and surely anyone can see that taking FM, Maths and one other subject is just too narrow (and admissions tutors definitely will)? LSE emphasises the breadth it's looking for in a number of ways....
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    I remember seeing this same information a long time ago, on a different page (I think they've changed their website layouts for each department recently for the whole 2012 entry shake up). Even if they didn't explicitly state Further Maths was seen as a fourth A-level, it should've been pretty obvious - their standard offer just included a pass in FM and surely anyone can see that taking FM, Maths and one other subject is just too narrow (and admissions tutors definitely will)? LSE emphasises the breadth it's looking for in a number of ways....
    Well, OP applied for economics and economic history, which falls into a different department and makes no mention of further maths not counting as a third A-level.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    Well, OP applied for economics and economic history, which falls into a different department and makes no mention of further maths not counting as a third A-level.
    Further Maths, Maths and Economics is an even worse subject combination for Economics and Economic History than for straight Economics! Even though there is no specific mention in there, you'd be plain naive to think that a very narrow subject mix wouldn't disadvantage you.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    Further Maths, Maths and Economics is an even worse subject combination for Economics and Economic History than for straight Economics! Even though there is no specific mention in there, you'd be plain naive to think that a very narrow subject mix wouldn't disadvantage you.
    The Economic History selectors are looking for academic students with a flair for social sciences, thus many applicants will be studying subjects such as History, Economics, Government and/or Geography. Whilst there is no one ideal subject combination which is deemed preferable to others, applicants, for the BSc Economic History course (V300) should note that at least one essay based subject is essential. The Department also offers two joint degrees which involve the study of a significant number of Economics modules. Applicants for these two courses are required to demonstrate outstanding mathematical ability and must either have attained or be completing Mathematics at Advanced level. This specific subject condition relates to the content of these degree programmes, at LSE, for which high levels of mathematical ability are essential. The majority of applicants for all our Economic History degrees will have studied either Economics or History, in some form, as part of their sixth-form curriculum, although, unlike mathematics these are not required subjects. Other subjects which appear as common post-16 choices are Further Maths, Physics, and Chemistry.
    Maths, further maths and economics seems fine...
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    Maths, further maths and economics seems fine...
    :facepalm2:

    The fact that FM is seen as only a fourth A-level in BSc Economics should tell you something. Econ + Economics History will be less quantatitave and more qualitative - can't you deduce that FM, Maths and Economics will be even less relevant here (and it's not even recommended for straigh Economics)?!? They may not spell it out for you, but his subject mix was clearly a factor leading to his rejection.
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    (Original post by Caro)
    You have to have firmed a university (QM here) to use adjustment anyway. Adjustment is the process on results day where you have got into your firm, but your grades excel the offer they gave you. For example in your case: Queen Mary Firmed for AAB, you get A*A*B. You have five days after your QM offer becomes unconditional to find a place. You won't lose your QM offer if you can't. So if you are not content with going to QM you can try adjustment (if you exceed their offer requirements) without fear of losing your spot there.
    The problem here is that LSE is fiercely competitive and there is a very small chance of getting anything in Adjustment from them. This is the same situation at all of the 'top ten' universities you described. If you are really, truly unhappy with your QM choice then I suggest you reapply. But do remember that the fees do greatly increase next year and the pay-back system is changing.

    For more information on adjustment: http://www.ucas.com/students/nextsteps/adjustment/
    Im definitley not applying next year, i cant afford to waste a year.. I realise lse is fiercely competitive i only live 10 min bus ride away, plus my neighbours son got in.... I dont mind going QM but recently as i spoke to people in the city.. they prefer the top 10 unis
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    The major contributing factor to you getting rejected by LSE was probably the fact that you're doing such a narrow subject base (Maths, Further Maths and Economics). LSE explicitly warns against this on their website; Further Maths is only seen as a fourth additional A-level by them.

    QMUL isn't a bad university by a long shot, it's quite good in fact. It's going to be hard to get into IB from there but it does happen.
    Thanks, but i'm not sure about IB, thinking of stockbroking as well.....
    LSE does recommend further maths for economics tho and other maths relate subjects they do though its not required
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    That's for 2012. OP isn't (I'm assuming) applying for 2012 entry.

    If OP is applying for deferred entry, then you are correct and I apologise.
    No cant defer, otherwise i might as well do a masters
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    :facepalm2:

    The fact that FM is seen as only a fourth A-level in BSc Economics should tell you something. Econ + Economics History will be less quantatitave and more qualitative - can't you deduce that FM, Maths and Economics will be even less relevant here (and it's not even recommended for straigh Economics)?!? They may not spell it out for you, but his subject mix was clearly a factor leading to his rejection.
    It wasn't , i found out last friday it was because the admission felt i didnt show sufficient interest in studying economic history... but then again my mate got into maths with or and eco but he didnt write anything about economics :confused:
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    (Original post by Iqbal007)
    Basically my problem is that would like to do Economics at uni, so far i have got the following offers:
    Queen Mary- AAB (Likely to be firm)
    City- AAB
    Royal Holloway- ABB (Maybe insurance)
    Brunel- BBC (likely to be insurance)

    And i was rejected by LSE for economics and economic history (AAB)........

    My prediction is:
    Maths- A
    Economics- A
    Further Maths-B

    But i'm sure that I can get an A* in maths my only problem was S1 last year and also I can get an A* in Economics as well.

    My problem is that after being rejected by LSE, i feel incapable of doing well in the future careerwise. As I would like to work for a major banking or investment firm, working as a stockbroker, investment banker, someone who specialises on Sharia compliant market or be a financial consultant. I feel that by going to QM i will be put at a significant disadvantage even if I get a 2:1 or a first in comparison to someone who did as good at a Russell group uni.

    I have been speaking to many people in the city and some other links, they all said my choice of universities wasn't very good, but i got to stay in London to due to personal reasons. One contact who works at the human resources department at Goldman Sachs said that they look at where you get your degree from, they personally look at whether the universities is a top 10 uni in general

    I was looking at the prospects of doing better than my predictions which I am very confident of, so I believe that could try doing adjustment despite the very low success rate.

    Anyone have any ideas on whether any top universities for Economics do adjustment? In particular SOAS or LSE ( I know probably they might not, but i need every lead i can get )

    Also anyone know whats the best route I can take into getting into a top job but still going to QM? Like I was thinking masters, but its like £20+ at LSE

    All the help will be appreciated
    If you do end up with A*A*A I would recommend you take a year out and reapply. QMUL is a decent university but realistically it's not going to open up any doors for you if you are thinking about IB/Consultancy/Stock Broking.
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    (Original post by kbountra)
    If you do end up with A*A*A I would recommend you take a year out and reapply. QMUL is a decent university but realistically it's not going to open up any doors for you if you are thinking about IB/Consultancy/Stock Broking.
    I heard from people in the city i gotta do loads of work experience and internships, so far going to apply for paid this summer...
    I also might do a masters if i get 2:1 or first at better uni...
    Plus when i was at Barclays HQ, they talked to me about graduate programs
    Plus i really dont want to be falling behind on my education and as the fees are rising
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    (Original post by Iqbal007)
    I heard from people in the city i gotta do loads of work experience and internships, so far going to apply for paid this summer...
    I also might do a masters if i get 2:1 or first at better uni...
    Plus when i was at Barclays HQ, they talked to me about graduate programs
    Plus i really dont want to be falling behind on my education and as the fees are rising
    I'm sure you are intelligent enough to go to the top unis but I guess you are quite restricted if you can only apply to London ones. I don't think that being one year behind would put you at any disadvantage at all- in fact you could gain relevant work experience, save up money for university etc. so it could be beneficial. The fact is that internships are extremely competitive so having Oxbridge/LSE/UCL on your CV is gojng to put you at a significant advantage and IB/Broking firms do target those types of universities much more than others.
 
 
 
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