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    (Original post by midpikyrozziy)
    Not relevant to the thread, but it's similar to Film Studies. Obviously most people look at it as a weak A-level, which is true in terms of how universities see it, but this is completely unjustified. Most people have no idea what's actually on the course - the question I'm most commonly asked is "Don't you just have to watch loads of films and review them?". In reality, it's not too dissimilar to English Literature, in that you're just examining the themes presented in a medium of art, and how they're presented to the audience. In addition to that, you've got to be aware of the social and political context under which the films were made (involves a fair amount of History), and, of course, various filmmaking techniques and film history. Not saying it's as hard as Maths (although I got a lower grade in Film than Maths), but anyone who thinks it's easy is an idiot.

    They're all easier than English Language anyway. Now that's a doss subject.
    That's exactly what i'm trying to tell people! Film Studies is way harder than people expect it to be. People should not judge a subject unless they have taken it. The same applies to Media Studies
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    (Original post by BradfordCityJoss)
    The thing about Psychology is that the brain is almost impossible to observe and experimentation on
    Err.. What?

    Have you actually read any cog neurosci literature?
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    I think this image sums it up suitably.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Burn.

    I've also just seen your comments on a rather lewd thread, hahaha, shocking. :rolleyes:
    Do you have a deferred entry to Oxford?

    If not, having that in your sig makes you worse than ISA...
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    I don't memorise philosophy and ethics that's for sure. I don't just reiterate Kant said this, a recent study/theory supports him to achieve an A grade. Honestly, the A-level is a load of crap.
    Actually I find A level philosophy and ethics and A level psychology very similar, just psychology has shorter answers and is based on fact rather than opinion. For both you learn theories, for both you have to apply the theories to different situations (although I admit the application is more thorough with philosophy), and for both you have to compare the theories and explanations to each other. So long as you understand all the material well enough, I think you can get an A grade for both. (I'm talking A2 level btw, I did find AS level Psychology easy)
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    Just because you don't understand it doesn't mean it is Jargon. In fact, if anything it shows that psychology isn't just 'common sense' or Derren Brown tricks.
    I understood it. All your big science words you used I learnt about in my Biological Sciences module (mixture of physiology and anatomy) at uni. The jargon is not psychology, it's biology.

    I remember a lot of my friends at school did Psych A level cos it was easy. The coursework involved cutting out personal dating ads and saying men all valued beauty and women valued personality and saying yes this agrees with the theory we learnt in class.

    Compare with the coursework in History and R.S. A levels of carrying out your own independent study using resources and references - comparable to a degree level essay.
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    Psychology :teehee:
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    (Original post by maturestudy)
    Newton conjectured about gravity, "The force is proportional to the product of the two masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them."

    Newton was also into mysticism, religion, alchemy and a whole lot of other bat **** crazy stuff.
    Wow two excellent reasons for not having an a level in Newtonology.
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    (Original post by Wren)
    I understood it. All your big science words you used I learnt about in my Biological Sciences module (mixture of physiology and anatomy) at uni. The jargon is not psychology, it's biology.

    I remember a lot of my friends at school did Psych A level cos it was easy. The coursework involved cutting out personal dating ads and saying men all valued beauty and women valued personality and saying yes this agrees with the theory we learnt in class.

    Compare with the coursework in History and R.S. A levels of carrying out your own independent study using resources and references - comparable to a degree level essay.
    It's cognitive neuroscience. So yes, not exactly analogous of the whole of psychology but once you ignore the **** parts of psych, it is very scientific.

    Yeah the A-level is a pile of ****, I'm first to bash it, but that doesn't mean the whole discipline is. Reading an A-level psychology book to find Freud in a positive light, theories of why diets fail and the mechanisms of relationships is not representative of psychology and is honestly the biggest heap of crap you could put in an A-level.
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    (Original post by Wren)
    Compare with the coursework in History and R.S. A levels of carrying out your own independent study using resources and references - comparable to a degree level essay.
    It all depends on the exam board too though, I do Edexcel and we have to do a practical experiment for each Approach and design studies.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Err.. What?

    Have you actually read any cog neurosci literature?
    how applicable is psychology? how useful is it in real life?
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    (Original post by ilyking)
    how applicable is psychology? how useful is it in real life?
    If your arguing on the basis of applicability = academic worth, then leisure studies > philosophy

    And psychology does have a high level applicability. It is used in media, mental illness treatment, law, policing, morality and politics to name a few.
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    I don't take it, I was going to but I changed my mind. By what it sounds, it's just like any other A-level. You have lots to remember, there's analysis and critisism and essay writing involved. Alright, so it's not on the same level as Further Maths, but how can you compare two subjects so completely different? Maths is what creates the Universe in theory and so the equations and everything you learn is going to be difficult, because they are definite and they are complex. Psychology is the study of human mind and everything... Let's not compare what contrast so heavily.

    Yes, all it requires is remembering a great deal of information. Just like science - you remember the methods and the techniques - it's still all about remembering the information and applying it in different ways down to what the examiner wants, which is fed to you by your teacher in each subject anyway. You all get told how to apply your knowledge for the exam in each subject, so all you have to do is remember everything and apply it correct in every different subject. How does that make Psychology easier than English, Law, RE, Media, and even the harder subjects such as Philosophy and the sciences?

    I can't say I take this subject but I do take Philosophy and it is HARD, however I can understand that it is remembering theory and critiquing these theories in structured manners. I am told how to do this and I remember how to do this in the exam.. just like every other subject. Why are people so snobby about these things? If it's part of what you want to do when you get older then why does it matter.
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    hmm if you're talking about A-level then let me put it this way.

    Let's take you're average further maths class and and your average psychology class. Now make them switch places so they're learning the other subject. i.e. further maths students learning psychology and psychology students learning further maths. I'd place my money on the further maths students getting an A in psychology more often than the psychology student getting an A in further maths.

    Now this doesn't mean neccessarily it's a soft subject. Further maths would generally be considered more difficult (to be fair this is the same when comparing it to most other subjects save physics or chemistry) but I believe this 'softness' of A level psychology is heavily exaggerated. It's still reasonably challening compared to similar 'respectable' subjects such as history or english.
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    (Original post by Ewan)


    I think this image sums it up suitably.
    Out of rep for today, but thankyou for MAKING MY DAY!! :elmo:
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    (Original post by Fat-Love)
    hmm if you're talking about A-level then let me put it this way.

    Let's take you're average further maths class and and your average psychology class. Now make them switch places so they're learning the other subject. i.e. further maths students learning psychology and psychology students learning further maths. I'd place my money on the further maths students getting an A in psychology more often than the psychology student getting an A in further maths.

    Now this doesn't mean neccessarily it's a soft subject. Further maths would generally be considered more difficult (to be fair this is the same when comparing it to most other subjects save physics or chemistry) but I believe this 'softness' of A level psychology is heavily exaggerated. It's still reasonably challening compared to similar 'respectable' subjects such as history or english.
    That's just a reflection of the type of student who takes the subjects, not the disciplines themselves.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    In fact, go read about the origins of consciousness in the cerebral cortex where it's possibly derived from modalities within the visual and olfactory system and the binding of information through neural oscillations of synaptic threshold in action potential localising within the cerebral cortex. Then tell me if a) you even understand and b) psychology is not a science.
    You go girl! I should just go get myself some popcorn!

    Take that Mr conjecture and mysticism. Psychologists are not psychics you know...
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    Psychology is not physics, therefore it is not a real science.
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    (Original post by JayTeeKay)
    Psychology is not physics, therefore it is not a real science.
    what the heck! How did you figure out that?!
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    Lord Kelvin: 'In science there is only physics. All the rest is stamp collecting.'
    I kind of see his point. :P
 
 
 
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