Current tuition fees do you pay if your parents earn.... Watch

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AT82
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#1
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I have a mate that has justed asked me what the bounderies are: I know if your parents earn less than about £20k you don't pay anything and above about £40k you pay the full lot but does anybody know what the exact bounderies are with and where your source was?

Thanks.
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Soulfish
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The most any student will be asked to contribute towards their fees in 2002/03 will be £1,100. The actual amount will depend on the family's residual income:

If it is less than £20,000 they will pay nothing.
If it is between £20,480 and £30,501 they will pay part of the fees, worked out on a sliding scale.
If the residual income is above £30,502 then they will have to pay the full fee contribution of £1,100.
Students in Scotland do not have to pay tuition fees.
I found that on http://www.merlinhelpsstudents.com/studentlife/yourfinances/studentfinance/tuitionfees.asp
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elpaw
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the lower boundary is £20500 (which is coincidentally how much my parents earn).
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PQ
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The boundaries are still being discussed but if you have a look at the graph at the end of this pdf it spells out exactly how much you're likely to get in grants/loans depending on income.

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/hegateway/upl...19%20Jan_4.pdf

The main boundaries for the grant income are at ~ £16k you get everything and at around £33k you get nothing (with a funny bit between £26k and £33k where you get the same £4000 overall but some of it is from grants and your maintenance loan is reduced...I only found this out yesterday) (ignore the way the graph tails off at this point as they're removing the means testing on the last 25% of the loan so everyone gets full whack).

Ack and as usual I'm talking about the upcoming new system not the current one (obsessed? me?)
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elpaw
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(Original post by Pencil Queen)
The boundaries are still being discussed but if you have a look at the graph at the end of this pdf it spells out exactly how much you're likely to get in grants/loans depending on income.

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/hegateway/upl...19%20Jan_4.pdf

The main boundaries for the grant income are at ~ £16k you get everything and at around £33k you get nothing (with a funny bit between £26k and £33k where you get the same £4000 overall but some of it is from grants and your maintenance loan is reduced...I only found this out yesterday) (ignore the way the graph tails off at this point as they're removing the means testing on the last 25% of the loan so everyone gets full whack).
Thios is the 2006 system, but i think amazingtrade was asking about the current system
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PQ
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(Original post by elpaw)
Thios is the 2006 system, but i think amazingtrade was asking about the current system
Yep...I'm being dense this morning :rolleyes:
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AT82
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hehe that did have me confused for a second. Thanks I've got the info now anyway. It was just somebody being put of going to uni as he thought he would have to pay £1100 a year fees. I told him we wouldn't but needed a source to back up my claims.

I'll have to pay probably about £300 next year as my parents will probably earn around £21k.
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elpaw
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In 2003/04 the maximum amount that any student will be asked to contribute towards their fees is £1,125. Most students will be asked to contribute less than this depending on their family income.

For 2003/04, students who depend financially on their parents and whose parents' residual income (income before deductions but minus certain allowances) is:

*less than £20,970 - make no contribution
*between £20,970 and £31,230 - pay a part contribution, worked out on a sliding scale
*£31,231or more - the full fee contribution of £1,125.

For 2003/04, students who are financially independent of their parents and whose residual family income (income before deductions but minus certain allowances) is:

*less than £18,040 - make no contribution;
*between £18,040 and £26,679 - a part contribution, worked out on a sliding scale
*£26,680 or more - pay the full fee contribution of £1,125
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PQ
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Dont forget this too

1 . Full time students

For September 2004 the Government has announced it intention (subject to changes in Regulations) to introduce a new Higher Education Grant.

- The grant will be worth up to £1,000 a year for new students.

- Students whose family income is £15,200 or less will get the full grant.

- Students with family incomes of between £15,201 & £21,185 will get a partial grant.

Eligible students will get the grant paid to them automatically by their Local Education Authorities (LEAs) when they apply for help with their fees and student loans.

It is expected that around one in three new students will get the full grant and that a further one in ten will get a partial grant. [Note; the HE Grant will be available to new students only. It will not be available to students already in higher education.]
http://www.dfes.gov.uk/studentsuppor...nts/fut_.shtml
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yawn1
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(Original post by Pencil Queen)
Dont forget this too


http://www.dfes.gov.uk/studentsuppor...nts/fut_.shtml
Pencil - I tried to post a congratulatory post to you yesterday on the university website but as server was busy all that came up was your quote!! So I want to say that I have great admiration for your gift in providing us with all statistics related to education. You are a real asset to this forum - thanks
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PQ
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
I'll have to pay probably about £300 next year as my parents will probably earn around £21k.
Isn't your sister starting uni next september? If so the cost of that will get taken into account (my sister didn't get a grant when I was living at home but once we were both at uni we both got a (admittedly very small) grant).
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PQ
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(Original post by yawn1)
Pencil - I tried to post a congratulatory post to you yesterday on the university website but as server was busy all that came up was your quote!! So I want to say that I have great admiration for your gift in providing us with all statistics related to education. You are a real asset to this forum - thanks
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ickle_katy
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(Original post by Pencil Queen)
Isn't your sister starting uni next september? If so the cost of that will get taken into account (my sister didn't get a grant when I was living at home but once we were both at uni we both got a (admittedly very small) grant).

all that happened this year when both me and my sis went to uni is i get £158 more loan.

love Katy ***
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