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    Hi,

    In one of my assignments I'm asked to calculate the concentration of protein in different protein standards without drawing a standard curve (even if i were to draw a standard curve i have no reference numbers).

    Whilst conducting the practical I obtained their absorbance at (562nm), for example :

    Tube 2:
    Standard BCA mg/ml (ul) = 20
    Water (ul) = 80
    Absorbance (562nm) = 0.8555


    From only this given information is there a way to calculate protein concentration (mg/ml)?
    If so can you please set me some guide lines

    thanks
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    looks like they want you to apply the beer-lambert law. you must have been told the extinction coefficient of your protein at 562nm somewhere? use A = ecl

    but with ONLY the given information you wrote there, i don't think it's possible.

    edit: wait, what do you mean by "standard BCA mg/ml"? a 1mg/ml protein standard solution, containing BCA? or just 1mg/ml BCA?
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    i believe it may be 1 mg/ml

    There was no extinction coefficient of protein at 562nm given
 
 
 
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