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    About 4 years ago I had an appointment with an NHS orthodontist to find out if they could do anything about my overbite (I had to actually say to my dentist about it, I've had it forever but he never talked about fixing it). After impressions, measurements and x-rays, the orthodontist told me I actually had an underdeveloped lower jaw that could be corrected with surgery along with braces to fix my overbite. I was quite shocked and totally chickened out at the thought of surgery so nothing was done. However, I have totally regretted not going ahead with it. I am now 20 and at uni and feel totally self-conscious about my smile and overall jaw appearnce so I'm planning on mentioning it to my dentist again at my next check-up next month.
    I was just wondering if anyone had any experience of the procedure - braces and operation. I have read loads of stuff on the internet recently about the swelling and recovery (the liquid diet is totally putting me off). I've mentioned it to my mum but she doesn't think its a good idea - especially as it would all be done whilst I was studying for my degree but I feel self-confidence would be greatly improved along with not getting as many headaches due to my jaw.
    Does anyone know what the general timeline would be for treatment and if it would be even possible with the budget cuts and other stuff happening in the NHS now? I just wanted to talk to someone about it all because its all I've been thinking about recently.

    Thanks
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    Heya, I didn't have surgery for an overbite but I did have it for an underbite, which is a pretty similar-ish procedure (braces, operation, recovery, liquid diet etc!)

    It was a pretty long timeline - I had braces from when I was 13, then I had the surgey when I was 16, just after I started college. I don't know if you've already had braces or if you'd still need them or anything, so that might be different for you? It is a good idea to think about when you'll be having it done, because it depends how long you'll need off afterwards - I was originally going to have two weeks off college, but I ended up missing four weeks off college (and then having two weeks off for Christmas, so really I had 6 weeks off). I don't think I could have gone back before that though because it's really exhausting when you can't open your mouth enough to speak (or breathe through your mouth at first!). Although I was very, very anaemic at the time, so I don't know if that made a difference.

    But although that makes it sound really negative, it was definitely worthwhile having the operation - it made so much difference to my jaw appearance, I'm so much less self-conscious about that now.

    The recovery isn't nice, but it really really is worth it. There was a lot of swelling for the first couple of weeks, but obviously it goes down so if you do decide to have it don't worry too much about that! The liquid diet is really frustrating (especially when your friends and family sit and eat in front of you >.<), I had my jaw surgery in mid-November and started eating proper meals again the week of Christmas, so about 4 weeks I guess. You kinda live off soup and build-up milkshakes for a while (and even soups were too thick for me at first >.<), but I definitely wouldn't change it because it was worth it.

    I'd assume it must be possible even with the budget cuts with the NHS, so I wouldn't worry about that though.

    Erm, I can't really think of anything else but if there's anything you want to know about the recovery/liquid diet/surgery part I can tell you as much as I can! I know it's a slightly different op, but it's similar recoveries/preparation etc.
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    Hey

    Thanks for your reply - good to hear from someone who has actually went through it. I definately think I will mention it to my dentist next month - if not, I think I'll always regret it - better to have a couple of years of braces etc and a few months of a sore swollen jaw than wondering forever what it could have been like if I'd went ahead with it.

    Thanks again - I'll keep you updated with what happens
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    I've also had surgery for underbite, last october actually - after having had my braces on for almost 2,5 years. I will be taken them off in june so it will be a total of almost 3 years which is pretty common even if you don't get surgery. I'm very happy with the result but it was a couple of very hard weeks to go through. I wouldn't say that it hurt because I got pain killers but mostly it was just psychologically exhausting, I didn't even want to look myself in the mirror the first week haha - I was so swollen and I was hungry! I probably went back to school after like 4 weeks or something but still I was very swollen so I used a scarf to wrap around half of my head haha. And oh, I'm 20 by the way and in my opinion I see a lot of people my age with braces so it's definitely not too late for your, better getting it fixed while you're young so you'll have a lifetime with straight teeth! if you have any questions about the surgery just ask
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    And about the liquid diet-part, didn't really stick to mine. I just cut my pizza in very small bites so I could swallow them, dieting isn't really my thing hahah chocolate pudding and ice cream works too, you'll be fine
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    (Original post by Liv1204)
    Heya, I didn't have surgery for an overbite but I did have it for an underbite, which is a pretty similar-ish procedure (braces, operation, recovery, liquid diet etc!)

    It was a pretty long timeline - I had braces from when I was 13, then I had the surgey when I was 16, just after I started college. I don't know if you've already had braces or if you'd still need them or anything, so that might be different for you? It is a good idea to think about when you'll be having it done, because it depends how long you'll need off afterwards - I was originally going to have two weeks off college, but I ended up missing four weeks off college (and then having two weeks off for Christmas, so really I had 6 weeks off). I don't think I could have gone back before that though because it's really exhausting when you can't open your mouth enough to speak (or breathe through your mouth at first!). Although I was very, very anaemic at the time, so I don't know if that made a difference.

    But although that makes it sound really negative, it was definitely worthwhile having the operation - it made so much difference to my jaw appearance, I'm so much less self-conscious about that now.

    The recovery isn't nice, but it really really is worth it. There was a lot of swelling for the first couple of weeks, but obviously it goes down so if you do decide to have it don't worry too much about that! The liquid diet is really frustrating (especially when your friends and family sit and eat in front of you >.<), I had my jaw surgery in mid-November and started eating proper meals again the week of Christmas, so about 4 weeks I guess. You kinda live off soup and build-up milkshakes for a while (and even soups were too thick for me at first >.<), but I definitely wouldn't change it because it was worth it.

    I'd assume it must be possible even with the budget cuts with the NHS, so I wouldn't worry about that though.

    Erm, I can't really think of anything else but if there's anything you want to know about the recovery/liquid diet/surgery part I can tell you as much as I can! I know it's a slightly different op, but it's similar recoveries/preparation etc.
    I'm having this operation sometime in the near future (got the braces on and everything) and was wondering- were you able to manage the pain with painkillers? I'm not worried about the swollen jaw or liquid diet, because I had my wisdoms out recently and couldn't eat solid food for a while- it was frustrating until I discovered what I could eat and my mouth was messed up for a few days.
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    Thanks for your replies.

    Had another thought - as I'm 20, would I still be able to get treatment done for free on the NHS? I've read it depends on how bad your overbite/overjet is. Spose I'll just need to wait and see :confused: .
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    (Original post by xlynzx)
    Thanks for your replies.

    Had another thought - as I'm 20, would I still be able to get treatment done for free on the NHS? I've read it depends on how bad your overbite/overjet is. Spose I'll just need to wait and see :confused: .
    I don't know at 20, but for those younger than that they decide if the treatment is for more than cosmetic reasons. So if it will help with things like speech and eating not just appearance you have a better chance of getting it free.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I'm having this operation sometime in the near future (got the braces on and everything) and was wondering- were you able to manage the pain with painkillers? I'm not worried about the swollen jaw or liquid diet, because I had my wisdoms out recently and couldn't eat solid food for a while- it was frustrating until I discovered what I could eat and my mouth was messed up for a few days.
    From what I remember, the pain wasn't too bad in general, definitely manageable with painkillers.

    When you first wake up after the operation it's very painful obviously (I cried when I woke up!), and for the first day or two I was on quite a lot of painkillers, but after that I hardly took any painkillers.

    But yes, don't worry too much about that! The hospital can sort you out with loads of painkillers and adjust the doses etc, but it's only the first few days that I remember it really hurting.
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    (Original post by xlynzx)
    Hi

    About 4 years ago I had an appointment with an NHS orthodontist to find out if they could do anything about my overbite (I had to actually say to my dentist about it, I've had it forever but he never talked about fixing it). After impressions, measurements and x-rays, the orthodontist told me I actually had an underdeveloped lower jaw that could be corrected with surgery along with braces to fix my overbite. I was quite shocked and totally chickened out at the thought of surgery so nothing was done. However, I have totally regretted not going ahead with it. I am now 20 and at uni and feel totally self-conscious about my smile and overall jaw appearnce so I'm planning on mentioning it to my dentist again at my next check-up next month.
    I was just wondering if anyone had any experience of the procedure - braces and operation. I have read loads of stuff on the internet recently about the swelling and recovery (the liquid diet is totally putting me off). I've mentioned it to my mum but she doesn't think its a good idea - especially as it would all be done whilst I was studying for my degree but I feel self-confidence would be greatly improved along with not getting as many headaches due to my jaw.
    Does anyone know what the general timeline would be for treatment and if it would be even possible with the budget cuts and other stuff happening in the NHS now? I just wanted to talk to someone about it all because its all I've been thinking about recently.

    Thanks
    To get it on the NHS you have to have a certain degree of overbite. I have one of 8/9mm so pretty much the most severe, anything around the 4mm mark or less they class as normal.

    I've just turned down jaw surgery and am planning to correct my overbite with braces alone. Had I gone for the surgery my treatment would have taken 3 years. The procedure is a big operation, and after speaking to my potential surgeon I realised it wasn't right for me. There is a fairly high risk of losing sensation in your lower lip when you have the operation, so you could have food dribbling down your lip but not realise it! The swelling can take months to go down, and you'd need at least a month at home to recover.

    In terms of the headaches, my surgeon made it quite clear not to have the operation in relation to my jaw aches and headaches as there is simply no guarantee or high chance that surgery will correct this.

    My last reason for not going for the surgery was that when I moved my jaw forward it completely changed my profile, and it was actually very weird to see for me. It didn't suit me at all, so I think you should try that out too.

    It is completely up to you what you go for if you still qualify for NHS treatment, but I hope my experience gives you some of the answers you're looking for
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    (Original post by MovingOn)
    To get it on the NHS you have to have a certain degree of overbite. I have one of 8/9mm so pretty much the most severe, anything around the 4mm mark or less they class as normal.

    I've just turned down jaw surgery and am planning to correct my overbite with braces alone. Had I gone for the surgery my treatment would have taken 3 years. The procedure is a big operation, and after speaking to my potential surgeon I realised it wasn't right for me. There is a fairly high risk of losing sensation in your lower lip when you have the operation, so you could have food dribbling down your lip but not realise it! The swelling can take months to go down, and you'd need at least a month at home to recover.

    In terms of the headaches, my surgeon made it quite clear not to have the operation in relation to my jaw aches and headaches as there is simply no guarantee or high chance that surgery will correct this.

    My last reason for not going for the surgery was that when I moved my jaw forward it completely changed my profile, and it was actually very weird to see for me. It didn't suit me at all, so I think you should try that out too.

    It is completely up to you what you go for if you still qualify for NHS treatment, but I hope my experience gives you some of the answers you're looking for
    I was advised that it wasn't possible to correct an overbite only with braces as the jaw isn't in the right place so the teeth wont stay for long. Thats the main reason why I went for the operation.

    Numbness in your lower lip is usually only temporary, and the swelling normally goes down within a month maximum.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I was advised that it wasn't possible to correct an overbite only with braces as the jaw isn't in the right place so the teeth wont stay for long. Thats the main reason why I went for the operation.

    Numbness in your lower lip is usually only temporary, and the swelling normally goes down within a month maximum.
    That's what I was told initially, but after my last consultation with the orthodontist and surgeon I was told my overbite could be halved to 4mm which is what is considered normal anyway. I won't have a 1/2mm gap without surgery, but it will be a normal measurement which is good enough for me

    On the DVD I got from hospital it said almost everyone is numb to begin with, and 1/3 people never regain sensation. For me that's a really high risk.
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    (Original post by MovingOn)
    That's what I was told initially, but after my last consultation with the orthodontist and surgeon I was told my overbite could be halved to 4mm which is what is considered normal anyway. I won't have a 1/2mm gap without surgery, but it will be a normal measurement which is good enough for me

    On the DVD I got from hospital it said almost everyone is numb to begin with, and 1/3 people never regain sensation. For me that's a really high risk.
    Lucky for some then. I'd love it if they said that to me but I can't remember what my gap is but it looks quite big and I've had my braces on for nearly 1 & a half years.
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    When I had my jaw operation (although again, for an underbite not overbite) they said numbness is very common but is usually only temporary. My lip and chin were completely numb for the first few months afterwards, but it generally didn't make too much of a difference (although it makes things like kissing feel a bit odd >.<).

    I had my jaw op in November 2005, and even now the feeling in my chin is slightly different to the rest of my face. It's hard to explain how, but it's like when someone brushes against your skin very gently so it sorts of 'tingles' rather than 'full sensation'. But it wasn't something that lasted permanently when it was completely numb (although there are some cases obviously).
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    (Original post by xlynzx)
    Thanks for your replies.

    Had another thought - as I'm 20, would I still be able to get treatment done for free on the NHS? I've read it depends on how bad your overbite/overjet is. Spose I'll just need to wait and see :confused: .
    I had the surgery for an underbite last July. Because the doctor did such a great job my brother (who is 23) is getting it done as well as he has a worse bite than I did but never did anything about it. He is paying for the braces BUT he is getting the operation under the NHS because he said it is psychologically affecting his life. TBH it's a bit farfetched but he is getting it for free so worth a go for you as well!

    I found my time in hospital horrible, i just wanted to go home. Mashed potato was a life saver as I was soooo hungry and there is only so many high calorie shakes I can take! The pain.....there wasn''t any. I had a few surgery complications so this increased me uncomfortability but i never remember the actual jaw hurting (and i skipped my meds quite a lot as i dont like using drugs too much). Just get a lot of films lined up as otherwise time will pass very slowly! My swelling took a long time to go down...i swear it is still going down. But the end result is so worth it!

    I remeber being really upset the week after it and crying and wishing i'd never done it but now im so happy and i can bite damn it!!!!
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    (Original post by Han4492)
    I had the surgery for an underbite last July. Because the doctor did such a great job my brother (who is 23) is getting it done as well as he has a worse bite than I did but never did anything about it. He is paying for the braces BUT he is getting the operation under the NHS because he said it is psychologically affecting his life. TBH it's a bit farfetched but he is getting it for free so worth a go for you as well!

    I found my time in hospital horrible, i just wanted to go home. Mashed potato was a life saver as I was soooo hungry and there is only so many high calorie shakes I can take! The pain.....there wasn''t any. I had a few surgery complications so this increased me uncomfortability but i never remember the actual jaw hurting (and i skipped my meds quite a lot as i dont like using drugs too much). Just get a lot of films lined up as otherwise time will pass very slowly! My swelling took a long time to go down...i swear it is still going down. But the end result is so worth it!

    I remeber being really upset the week after it and crying and wishing i'd never done it but now im so happy and i can bite damn it!!!!
    You just made my day. Thats the thing I'm worried about the most. I had my wisdom teeth out in February and my mouth swelled up a fair bit then and it didn't bother me at all. I'm just terrified of pain. As well as my wisdoms I also had 2 pre molars out- couldn't chew for 2 weeks- survived on baby food- farlys rusks, baby deserts, mashed up food.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    You just made my day. Thats the thing I'm worried about the most. I had my wisdom teeth out in February and my mouth swelled up a fair bit then and it didn't bother me at all. I'm just terrified of pain. As well as my wisdoms I also had 2 pre molars out- couldn't chew for 2 weeks- survived on baby food- farlys rusks, baby deserts, mashed up food.
    No problem. To be honest just don't think too much about or you'll psych yourself out. It really is fine and they give you so many strong painkillers and anti-inflammatories that your face (from under your eyes downwards) is completely numb. It's weird if anything not painful. And just to let you know in case your worried about losing sensation, my whole face was numb and now its all back and feely (very technical!).

    Good luck and I am more than happy to answer any other questions you may have.
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    (Original post by Han4492)
    No problem. To be honest just don't think too much about or you'll psych yourself out. It really is fine and they give you so many strong painkillers and anti-inflammatories that your face (from under your eyes downwards) is completely numb. It's weird if anything not painful. And just to let you know in case your worried about losing sensation, my whole face was numb and now its all back and feely (very technical!).

    Good luck and I am more than happy to answer any other questions you may have.
    Thank you so much for this. I'd seen others saying they were crying with the pain, which scared me.
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    I have had braces for 3 years and am due for underbite surgery in 2012. I am really self concious about my jaw but am still really nervous for this surgery, Im a emotional kind of person so am second guessing whether I will be able to go through the recovering process or not. Also I can imagine getting fustrated not being able to eat or talk properly, how difficult is it not being able to eat and after how long are you able to eat properly? And also approximately how much weight do you lose? I was advised to get the surgery done during summer holidays so that I have mroe time to recover, but I have a family wedding then, how long does it take to get a normal apperance after all the swelling and bruising, and I f I have it done during term time, after how long will I be well enough to attend university?
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    (Original post by Sannii Z)
    I have had braces for 3 years and am due for underbite surgery in 2012. I am really self concious about my jaw but am still really nervous for this surgery, Im a emotional kind of person so am second guessing whether I will be able to go through the recovering process or not. Also I can imagine getting fustrated not being able to eat or talk properly, how difficult is it not being able to eat and after how long are you able to eat properly? And also approximately how much weight do you lose? I was advised to get the surgery done during summer holidays so that I have mroe time to recover, but I have a family wedding then, how long does it take to get a normal apperance after all the swelling and bruising, and I f I have it done during term time, after how long will I be well enough to attend university?
    I haven't had it done yet, but I'd think you'd need 6-8 weeks at least judging from what I've read here and on other sites.
 
 
 
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