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    • #10
    #10

    I had upper jaw surgery last week ! the hardest week ever haven;t slept for more than 3 hours a day tbh
    I was in hospital for 4 days and legit couldn't eat anything and found it very hard to drink water. And i had a lot of bleeding after my surgery from my nose so they had to put nose splints in - worst feeling ever when they took it out. My swelling has been horrible especially on my lips. I still can't move my top lip.

    There was this other girl who had both jaws done by my surgeon on the same day and she had to be fed through a NG feeding tube because she couldn't even open her mouth???
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    Hey folks,

    Just wondering if anyone has had any treatment or being seen by Poole hospital, in Dorset? It seems most people are London way.

    Also, I have just had my joint clinic to discuss my surgery and it has come to light I will need my nose shortened to balance out my face after my underbite is dealt with, has anyone else had this?

    and lastlyyyy.... how long has your wait been since your joint clinic to surgery date? I tried to ask how long I should expect to wait but no one was willing to give time scales?
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    (Original post by Liv1204)
    Heya, I didn't have surgery for an overbite but I did have it for an underbite, which is a pretty similar-ish procedure (braces, operation, recovery, liquid diet etc!)

    It was a pretty long timeline - I had braces from when I was 13, then I had the surgey when I was 16, just after I started college. I don't know if you've already had braces or if you'd still need them or anything, so that might be different for you? It is a good idea to think about when you'll be having it done, because it depends how long you'll need off afterwards - I was originally going to have two weeks off college, but I ended up missing four weeks off college (and then having two weeks off for Christmas, so really I had 6 weeks off). I don't think I could have gone back before that though because it's really exhausting when you can't open your mouth enough to speak (or breathe through your mouth at first!). Although I was very, very anaemic at the time, so I don't know if that made a difference.

    But although that makes it sound really negative, it was definitely worthwhile having the operation - it made so much difference to my jaw appearance, I'm so much less self-conscious about that now.

    The recovery isn't nice, but it really really is worth it. There was a lot of swelling for the first couple of weeks, but obviously it goes down so if you do decide to have it don't worry too much about that! The liquid diet is really frustrating (especially when your friends and family sit and eat in front of you >.<), I had my jaw surgery in mid-November and started eating proper meals again the week of Christmas, so about 4 weeks I guess. You kinda live off soup and build-up milkshakes for a while (and even soups were too thick for me at first >.<), but I definitely wouldn't change it because it was worth it.

    I'd assume it must be possible even with the budget cuts with the NHS, so I wouldn't worry about that though.

    Erm, I can't really think of anything else but if there's anything you want to know about the recovery/liquid diet/surgery part I can tell you as much as I can! I know it's a slightly different op, but it's similar recoveries/preparation etc.
    Hiya, I'll be having a similar operation. I'm quite nervous because I've heard how your face can change dramatically if you have it. My underbite is really big which probably means that I'll have a lot if excess skin! What would they do if this happened? Also I'm 18 and I have not had my braces fitted yet or surgery, I'd this a bad thing?

    Thank you 😊
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    Hi, i have an underbite and might be getting surgery and i was wondering, your voice and breathing n stuff isn't affected right? also what about speaking? was it hard after surgery?
    I was also told that if i do have the surgery, it would be when i'm 18 but i'd rather wwhen im 16?
    Sorry for the loadd of questions

    Thanks
    • #10
    #10

    (Original post by swasian)
    Hi, i have an underbite and might be getting surgery and i was wondering, your voice and breathing n stuff isn't affected right? also what about speaking? was it hard after surgery?
    I was also told that if i do have the surgery, it would be when i'm 18 but i'd rather wwhen im 16?
    Sorry for the loadd of questions

    Thanks
    Your voice isn't affected (mine wasn't) but your breathing a little for the first week or so. You might not be able to breathe through your nose for a while if you have your upper jaw done... And speaking was hard for the first few days and after that it was okay you'll sound very awkward for a few weeks though especially if you have a splint but you'll get used to it.
    And you won't be able to have the surgery until your body has stopped growing but it's up to your ortho/surgeon when they want to do it.
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    I have recently undergone a bimaxillary osteotomy (double jaw surgery) on the 9th of April. I was just wondering how long it took for people with similar surgeries to have their braces removed and if we can request to have them taken off? im currently having to use elastics on my braces to guide the teeth in perfect formation but I'm extremely happy with the current state of my teeth and no longer wish to prolong my orthodontic treatment. Any advice from people who have undergone similar treatment would be much appreciated.
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    (Original post by Arman_Partow)
    I have recently undergone a bimaxillary osteotomy (double jaw surgery) on the 9th of April. I was just wondering how long it took for people with similar surgeries to have their braces removed and if we can request to have them taken off? im currently having to use elastics on my braces to guide the teeth in perfect formation but I'm extremely happy with the current state of my teeth and no longer wish to prolong my orthodontic treatment. Any advice from people who have undergone similar treatment would be much appreciated.
    I'm supposed to have this. what is it like?

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    (Original post by donutaud15)
    I'm supposed to have this. what is it like?

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    well i went into the operation extremely nervous and had some serious doubts for a long time. Try to remember why you are doing this surgery and it will help you through your recovery. Be prepared to deal with a lot of pain after surgery. Although this surgery was the hardest thing ive ever had to go through, the amount of compliments i have gotten from people close to me makes me think it has all been worth it. Just remember to not leave hospital early as i left the day after surgery but had to be readmitted due to dehydration and trouble swallowing pain medication. If you have any questions just let me know. Good luck with your surgery!
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    Hi

    i am over 18 and I have quite a severe cross bite, I assume that is what it is. My jaw also protrudes to the left. My teeth are approximately 6mm out of line between the top and bottom.

    i had braces in my teens but even though I had this problem at that time, I was never offered any surgery to correct my jaw alignment. I hate my smile and the way it makes me look, always have since being a child.

    My teeth are pretty crooked and crowded again, even though I had braces. I was referred to a private orthodontist by my regular dentist over a year ago who said he was unable to help. This was because if he was to straighten my teeth they would then be in a traumatic bite and could be damaged.

    I have now been referred to the NHS orthodontic department at a local hospital, at my request - do you think it's likely they will see me and possibly offer treatment? Has anyone else had a similar experience. It really affects my self confidence and I get a lot of headaches which are often unexplained and I have difficulty breathing through my nose as well and I wonder if it could be linked.

    Thanks in advance x
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    Hi Violetb,

    The NHS will almost definitely treat you for your jaw problems as it is affecting your health. At your appointment they will look at your teeth and see what needs to be done and they will then put you on the waiting list for braces. You will probably have braces for 6 Months - 2 years depending on how crooked and out of position they are then you will have surgery after that.

    I'm going through the same thing and I am having Surgery in July.

    Hope this helps.
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    OK, so I am 8 days post op - I had a maxillary osteotomy (lower jaw) for an overbite on the NHS at University Hospital Coventry, I am 40 years old and thought I would write and let you know what it is really like, step by step, because I had so many questions beforehand that nobody seemed able to answer. So here goes:

    I had my braces fitted in November 2012 and by March 2014 I had the joint clinic with my orthodontist and surgeon in order to discuss the op. They informed me that I needed to have extra hooks and links put on my existing braces and these needed 6 weeks to settle before the next step, also that I would need all 4 wisdom teeth removed. Then there were several appointments checking bites, taking moulds, and pre op checks. Finally, my op took place on 16 May 2014 - went very smoothly and I was released from hospital after 2 days. When I first came out of surgery I was able to talk - I think this was because I had so many pain killers running through my body - but by the time I got home, it was all a bit too painful - so I have my laptop with me constantly and just type instead of talking...

    The most important factors I think are as follows:

    1. Moisturize your lips with lots of vaseline for a week or two before the op - they stretch your mouth a lot in surgery so your lips can get sore, also you won't be able to lick your lips post surgery and they will get very dry.

    2. Have lots of cold packs and packets of frozen peas ready in advance to help keep the swelling down when you get home - I mean lots - the cold packs usually only stay cold for about 30 mins, so you need plenty to swap them with - I found that if I could control the swelling then it wasn't so painful.

    3. Ensure that the hospital prescribe you liquid medicine (not pills!!) and make sure you are on top of your medication and organise a chart in advance - I was quite dozy following the op and found it hard to remember what I had taken and when - really important to ensure you always have some painkillers running through your body, the pain never has a chance to get too bad if you do.

    4. Forget about eating anything other than soup through a straw - especially if you have a wafer (splint) in your mouth. Breakfast is usually milky porridge put through a blender and lunch/tea is watered down soup, if you accept this, then you'll get on much better. There are loads of ways to treat yourself; a milk shake with a mars bar blended into it (no really - it's lovely) is just one of them - but you will find your appetite is less than usual and it takes so long to get through a bowl of soup with a straw that you are usually too exhausted for a while to think about eating again.

    5. When I first came out of hospital my lower face was practically numb - it felt very swollen and in fact I felt like my lips were going to burst, but
    after about the 4th day the skin became incredibly sensitive and it felt like a combination of sunburn and pins and needles - very sore to the touch, but I guess its just the feeling coming back into the skin, which can only be good.

    6. Look after yourself, have lots of books, TV, films etc - and sleep as much as you can (preferably upright to help swelling) Accept that you have just had major surgery and need to recover - time to catch up on all those box sets you've missed.

    So far, I think that's it. I'm due to see the surgeon for my post op check on Tuesday so if he has anything of interest to report, then I'll let you know - please feel free to ask any questions if anybody wants to know anything I haven't already told you, I'm only sitting in bed staring at the TV, so quite happy to chat....

    Good luck to anyone out there having similar surgery - hope this helps x
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    So I am now almost 2 weeks post op - saw the surgeon again today for a check up and he confirmed that the pins and needles/sunburn feeling is a positive sign and means that my nerves are starting to work again - he took out the very strong bands, leaving only two smaller ones which means that I can now speak (after a fashion) although its hard to do so without dribbling. Such a good look!

    He also showed me how to remove the bands for eating and brushing my teeth! Although, I am still only allowed to eat pureed food, at least now I can try some scrambled egg or mashed potatoes on a very shallow spoon! The wafer (splint) remains in between my teeth and should be removed by the orthodontist next week, all being well. I will report any useful information he gives me following that appointment. Cheers x
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    Hello,I'm 28 and have a quite serious overbite. It's really effecting my confidence. I don't have a dentist and the last time I went to the dentist was about 2years ago. How do I go about starting the ball rolling for possible jaw surgery?
    Thank you
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    @VickityV Thanks very much for sharing your experience, its really helpful.

    I have recently been given the option of surgery (upper and lower) to correct my bite, no one had mentioned this option before now, and many people who've had surgery seem to be late teens/early 20s when still in education. I'm 27 in a couple of months and I'm concerned about how this will affect my life socially as well as at work.

    Were you concerned about how you would look and get on with your working life?
    Did it affect your working life a lot due to appointments, pschologically or because of changes in appearance?

    I am concerned about the process (2/3 years of braces and a scary surgery to look forward to), the effect it will have on me/my life but also potentially the regret i might feel for not doing it.

    Thanks x
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    (Original post by Gazmcfc)
    Hello,I'm 28 and have a quite serious overbite. It's really effecting my confidence. I don't have a dentist and the last time I went to the dentist was about 2years ago. How do I go about starting the ball rolling for possible jaw surgery?
    Thank you
    You could probably get referred from your GP, as well as a dental school if you are having problems registering with a dentist.
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    (Original post by RawJaw)
    @VickityV Thanks very much for sharing your experience, its really helpful.

    I have recently been given the option of surgery (upper and lower) to correct my bite, no one had mentioned this option before now, and many people who've had surgery seem to be late teens/early 20s when still in education. I'm 27 in a couple of months and I'm concerned about how this will affect my life socially as well as at work.

    Were you concerned about how you would look and get on with your working life?
    Did it affect your working life a lot due to appointments, pschologically or because of changes in appearance?

    I am concerned about the process (2/3 years of braces and a scary surgery to look forward to), the effect it will have on me/my life but also potentially the regret i might feel for not doing it.

    Thanks x
    I understand your concern and I have to say that I am led to believe that upper and lower jaw surgery together is worse post op than lower jaw surgery - however, it is a relatively short time frame overall. it has been nearly 2 years that I have been wearing braces and the time has flown - the surgery came around very quickly - and appointments are approximately every 8 weeks with the orthodontist, so not too bad from a work point of view. With regards to the surgery - I would say that you definitely need a month off work post op at the very least - especially for both jaws - it is 3 weeks today exactly since my surgery and I am still very tired and find it hard to focus for long. From a work point of view, the braces had no effect at all - I think people are used to seeing older people with braces now so it's not a big deal, I was very conscious of it for a while, but I soon forgot I was wearing them. I was very worried about how different I would look after the surgery, but actually I think I look better... My orthodontist told me that he has never met a person who didn't look better following the surgery, because it balances the face out... I certainly am happy with my look and I've been used to looking at my face for 40 years I wish you lots of luck with your decision making - it's a hard choice to make, but I (certainly so far) am very glad I've done it. Sorry for the ramble - hope this helps and please feel free to IM me if you want x
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    Thank you for the updates Vicky, its very useful to know the details post surgery that the consultant and medical professionals can't tell you. I have my appointment with the consultant orthodontist on Wednesday which i am quite nervous about. I assume this is when i will find out if they will accept me or not.

    What kind of issues did you have prior to your surgery that led to you being accepted?

    I have aches in my jaw, clicking now and again. I also have unexplained frequent headaches and i have had unexplained pain in my right shoulder for over 10 years ( which i have read could be linked - its been investigated and at 20 i was told it was wear and tear! ), i also have difficulty breathing through my nose alongside the confidence issues i have regarding my appearance due to my lobsided jaw . I'm so worried that they wont accept me , and if they don't i am not sure how i will cope.

    I am 30 and have hated my appearance due to my jaw for as long as i can remember, as i said i had braces as a teen. But it was never addressed and only because i read up and asked to be referred did i find out i may have a small chance of finally having something done about it
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    (Original post by Violetb)
    Thank you for the updates Vicky, its very useful to know the details post surgery that the consultant and medical professionals can't tell you. I have my appointment with the consultant orthodontist on Wednesday which i am quite nervous about. I assume this is when i will find out if they will accept me or not.

    What kind of issues did you have prior to your surgery that led to you being accepted?

    I have aches in my jaw, clicking now and again. I also have unexplained frequent headaches and i have had unexplained pain in my right shoulder for over 10 years ( which i have read could be linked - its been investigated and at 20 i was told it was wear and tear! ), i also have difficulty breathing through my nose alongside the confidence issues i have regarding my appearance due to my lobsided jaw . I'm so worried that they wont accept me , and if they don't i am not sure how i will cope.

    I am 30 and have hated my appearance due to my jaw for as long as i can remember, as i said i had braces as a teen. But it was never addressed and only because i read up and asked to be referred did i find out i may have a small chance of finally having something done about it
    Hi Violet,

    My problem was that I had lots of teeth removed by my dentist when I was a child and as a result my lower jaw never fully developed so I was left with an overbite. Although facially I wasn't particularly unhappy with how I looked, my lower teeth rested on the roof of my mouth, at the place where my front teeth met the gum. This caused a lot of trauma to my top teeth, caused difficulty with eating as often bits of food would be pushed up under my gum and behind my front teeth, and in the latter stages my lower teeth had worn away the roots of my top teeth and started hitting the nerves.... ouch!

    The only way to save my teeth was to have this treatment and my consultant kept asking me over and over again at my first appointment how I felt about my appearance, so I think this is a big factor - if you are unhappy and it is affecting your confidence, then it will certainly go in your favour.

    Don't worry too much about the appointment, the worst thing they will do is take impressions of your teeth and X-ray them. Good luck and please let us know how you get on.

    xx Vicky
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    (Original post by VickityV)
    I understand your concern and I have to say that I am led to believe that upper and lower jaw surgery together is worse post op than lower jaw surgery - however, it is a relatively short time frame overall. it has been nearly 2 years that I have been wearing braces and the time has flown - the surgery came around very quickly - and appointments are approximately every 8 weeks with the orthodontist, so not too bad from a work point of view. With regards to the surgery - I would say that you definitely need a month off work post op at the very least - especially for both jaws - it is 3 weeks today exactly since my surgery and I am still very tired and find it hard to focus for long. From a work point of view, the braces had no effect at all - I think people are used to seeing older people with braces now so it's not a big deal, I was very conscious of it for a while, but I soon forgot I was wearing them. I was very worried about how different I would look after the surgery, but actually I think I look better... My orthodontist told me that he has never met a person who didn't look better following the surgery, because it balances the face out... I certainly am happy with my look and I've been used to looking at my face for 40 years I wish you lots of luck with your decision making - it's a hard choice to make, but I (certainly so far) am very glad I've done it. Sorry for the ramble - hope this helps and please feel free to IM me if you want x
    Thanks for replying! Did you have silver braces? I'm hoping to find out if I can get clear ones, but having never had braces before I have no idea what's possible/if there's any pros/cons in clear vs silver.

    It's really good to know you're still glad you went through with it and it didn't impact on your work, at this point it's difficult to imagine how it might affect things.

    I wish you speedy recovery now you're into the final stages - you're on the home stretch! x
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    (Original post by RawJaw)
    Thanks for replying! Did you have silver braces? I'm hoping to find out if I can get clear ones, but having never had braces before I have no idea what's possible/if there's any pros/cons in clear vs silver.

    It's really good to know you're still glad you went through with it and it didn't impact on your work, at this point it's difficult to imagine how it might affect things.

    I wish you speedy recovery now you're into the final stages - you're on the home stretch! x
    Hi there, yes I had (and still have) the silver braces. I had a friend with clear braces, but I always thought it looked like she hadn't brushed her teeth properly, because it looked like there was stuff on her teeth, but because it was clear you couldn't really tell what it was... silver braces make it obvious - each to their own though. I'm not sure if they do clear braces on the NHS.... might depend where you are.

    I am back at work full time now - feeling fine apart from the pins and needlesy feeling in my skin. Looking forward to a big mac!! lol
 
 
 
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